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AA and Other Twelve Step Groups - Cults

 
Sandy
 
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Sandy
Total Posts:  540
Joined  22-11-2005
 
 
 
07 January 2007 23:07
 

Alcohol is apparently an addictive drug to millions of people.  When this is finally part of our kid’s education, it might cut back on the number of alcoholics we have to worry about.

I do not want another government prohibition issued by the do-gooders but can only hope we pass this information down to the next generation.

 
PurpleKU77
 
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PurpleKU77
Total Posts:  62
Joined  01-10-2006
 
 
 
14 January 2007 17:12
 

Again, if it works, and keeps people from ruining their lives, is it still evil?

 
BRAC Rep.
 
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BRAC Rep.
Total Posts:  10
Joined  07-02-2007
 
 
 
09 February 2007 03:30
 

[quote author=“Ellecram”]For the last 18 months I have been involved in several online groups that discuss the cult aspects and subsequent harm caused by coerced (and chosen) involvement in AA/NA or any of the 12 step model groups prevalent in addiction treatment.

The basic premise is that AA et al are religious organizations and are minimally effective support groups.

Thoughts???

Elle

Nope—I’m VERY familiar with them. They believe that spiritualism can heal their problems—their “higher power” can be anything of their choosing.

Ben B.
BRAC Member

 
PurpleKU77
 
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PurpleKU77
Total Posts:  62
Joined  01-10-2006
 
 
 
19 February 2007 14:14
 

I guess so. 

 
Jack Holder
 
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Jack Holder
Total Posts:  1
Joined  28-02-2020
 
 
 
02 March 2020 16:28
 

Initially, the 12-step process was considered to be a Christian belief as it regards God as the highest power adding in the recovery process. This leads to many individuals avoiding the use of the AA 12-step program to recover. Over time, many recovery groups have amended the Christianity-oriented 12 rules of AA to make it acceptable for people with contrary beliefs. Now, people from different religious beliefs are employed in Alcoholics Anonymous.

 
Twissel
 
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Twissel
Total Posts:  3071
Joined  19-01-2015
 
 
 
02 March 2020 21:42
 

The idea that you can get the help of a “higher power” when your own efforts are insufficient is a psychological trick similar to visualizing yourself in the future when making current decisions or having a picture of watching eyes near an unguarded cookie jar.
Nothing supernatural about it.

 
 
Brick Bungalow
 
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Brick Bungalow
Total Posts:  5315
Joined  28-05-2009
 
 
 
02 May 2020 16:36
 

I want to give due credit to the AA and NA organizers I know personally who make the effort to be inclusive and, as much as possible, non dogmatic. Often suggesting that god can be an acronym of your choosing.

Not to defend the logic of this mind you, but rather the earnest sentiment and spirit of resourcefulness. I don’t personally subscribe to the AA method but I know many people who consider it essential to their survival.

I think the steps are valid. Just not exclusive. I don’t personally like the notion of describing a habit as a disease but I respect that substance abuse is, for many people effectively inherited.

If I could change one thing it would be AA’s entanglement with the court system. I think mandating this kind of treatment both violates civil liberties and defeats the treatment at the level of concept… given the role of personal ownership and sincere desire within the steps.

I do think its good to be open minded about the kinds of tools that different people need to thrive.

 
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