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Coen Brothers

 
Rob P
 
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Rob P
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Joined  12-05-2009
 
 
 
12 May 2009 22:43
 

I just saw Big Lebowski for the first time the other day. What a great movie. Right up there with Fargo and No Country For Old Men. I really think these guys are the most talented writer/directors in the industry right now. Any other fans?

 
 
AtheianLibertarist
 
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AtheianLibertarist
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13 May 2009 03:33
 

Fargo is my favorite of theirs. They are quite tallented

 
 
Scott
 
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Scott
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Joined  09-05-2009
 
 
 
13 May 2009 14:21
 

No Country For Old Men, left me speechless the first time i saw it. I love that film. great writers and directors.

 
G.L-N
 
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G.L-N
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13 May 2009 17:02
 

It would seem to me that “Burn After Reading,” with its oh-so-subtle critique of the dumbed-down society and its consequences, went way over the heads of a very large number of people.

While I do regard “Fargo,” “No Country For Old Men” and “The Big Lebowski” as masterpieces, I get the impression that the brilliance of “Burn After Reading” has been overlooked. 

Too subtle, I suppose.

 
 
Bikewer
 
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Bikewer
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15 May 2009 15:23
 

I was greatly impressed by No Country For Old Men.  Sort of personally; I’m in the same position as Sheriff Bell; a 62-year old cop who sometimes feels
a bit “overmatched”.

 
JayD
 
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JayD
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26 May 2009 14:50
 

I’m generally a fan of the Coen Brothers, and The Big Lebowski  is one of my favourite films. But I thought No Country for Old Men was total nonsense. I just don’t know what the hell they were thinking. The first half of the film is good, up there with most top-tier thrillers. Then the protagonist is suddenly and unexpectedly killed off, and we have to sit through about forty minutes of Tommy Lee Jones’ inaudible mumbling. I assumed this was merely calm before the climactic storm, yet to my utter disgust there was no climax at all. It was as if the movie took a fatal blow to the head as the protagonist was lost, and then proceeded to die slowly and gradually over forty minutes of pathetic flailing around. No doubt the Coen Brothers thought this was clever and deep. In reality, all they were doing was wasting people’s time.

 
Bikewer
 
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Bikewer
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26 May 2009 22:00
 

Back when the movie came out, many expressed the same opinion.  I saw it differently….First, it was Sheriff Belll’s movie.  The guy with the money, the nasty assassin…Window dressing.  Bell is confronted by the changing law-enforcement scene; the vicious drug violence, the internicene warfare. 

The talk with the disabled ex-deputy is pivotal; it’s where Bell talks about being “overmatched”. 

Everyone expected a big, climactic shootout between Bell and Chirgur, in typical action-movie fashion.  Not to be…Bell sees the way the wind is blowing and retires.

The scene where Chirgur is blindsided in traffic….Earlier Bell says “you never see it coming”. 

Perhaps my take on these things, but I read a couple of reviewers who saw it that way as well, so I must not be totally out in left field.  (maybe against the warning track….)

 
JayD
 
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JayD
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27 May 2009 08:46
 
Bikewer - 26 May 2009 08:00 PM

Perhaps my take on these things, but I read a couple of reviewers who saw it that way as well, so I must not be totally out in left field.  (maybe against the warning track….)

Well yes, this seems to be the consensus among the critics. I just don’t get it. Why is it so good that we’re “expecting” a climax and yet don’t receive any? Anyone could think of this; it is a whole lot easier than, you know, designing an actual climax. Why not push this principle further and simply show us a blank screen, because we’re “expecting” a movie?

 
Bikewer
 
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Bikewer
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27 May 2009 14:10
 

I suppose that one might consider that the traditional forms for drama are not set in stone, and occasionally writers and directors may wish to tamper with these forms.    Back when a close friend of ours was in the performing arts program at an area college, we saw a lot of “experimental” plays.  Some of these were incomprehensible….
Still, some were clever.

The folks producing the thing take a risk, of course.  The audience may not be appreciative…

As I recall, No Country was critically well-thought-of but did not do well at the box office. 

My take on the film may be, as I indicated, entirely personal.  I’m a 62-year-old cop with increasingly wonky knees and I just had stents installed in one of my cardiac arteries.  I can see where Bell is coming from.

 
JayD
 
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JayD
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27 May 2009 19:46
 

I was surely being too dogmatic. Even if it ended abruptly after only an hour, it would still be a good film. I suppose I was very frustrated that there was no climax. Also, I’m not American, and I could not make out much of Tommy Lee Jones’ Texan accent. (What I did hear was funny and witty.) I owe it to the Coen Brothers to check out the film again, this time more sympathetically.

 
21stCenturyAtheist
 
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21stCenturyAtheist
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04 June 2009 03:44
 

I’m a fan.  I love their characters and their ability to put together a compelling story without much fluff.  They are unique and talented enough to study in a film class, yet entertaining and brutal enough to satisfy a mainstream audience.

 
 
KenneyP
 
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KenneyP
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04 June 2009 11:27
 

I really like Miller’s Crossing for some reason, I’d rate it higher than Fargo.

 
GAD
 
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GAD
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04 June 2009 13:20
 

The Big Lebowski a great movie? Why? Now, No Country for Old Men, that’s a great movie.

 
 
21stCenturyAtheist
 
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21stCenturyAtheist
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04 June 2009 14:04
 
GAD - 04 June 2009 11:20 AM

The Big Lebowski a great movie? Why? Now, No Country for Old Men, that’s a great movie.

The Big Lebowski is a great movie.  It has so much subtext of substance, yet it is a slacker comedy and an interesting crime story on the surface.  The characters are very memorable, the scenes and the antics are unforgettable. 

On the subtext, i’ll give just one example.  Did anyone else notice all the subtle references to the Gulf War throughout the film?  The movie is set during the beginning of the war.  The filmmakers are obviously chiming in on this war, and perhaps US policy in general, by modeling “The Dude” character after a real life anti-vietnam activist Jeff Dowd.  In the movie, “the dude” is a passivist and ex-radical.  The dialogue in the movie is aimed at outlining the difference between the “big lebowski,” a rich, traditional capitalist, and “the dude,” an ex-radical anti-war socialist from the 1970’s.  “the dude” in the movie is a shell of his former self, however, and seems to have largely given up on his political struggles.  They touch on this in the movie when “the big lebowski” taunts “the dude” when he is leaving his office in the beginning, “the bums lost.  Your revolution is over. The bums will always lose!”

 
 
burt
 
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burt
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04 June 2009 14:35
 
Bikewer - 27 May 2009 12:10 PM

I suppose that one might consider that the traditional forms for drama are not set in stone, and occasionally writers and directors may wish to tamper with these forms.    Back when a close friend of ours was in the performing arts program at an area college, we saw a lot of “experimental” plays.  Some of these were incomprehensible….
Still, some were clever.

The folks producing the thing take a risk, of course.  The audience may not be appreciative…

As I recall, No Country was critically well-thought-of but did not do well at the box office. 

My take on the film may be, as I indicated, entirely personal.  I’m a 62-year-old cop with increasingly wonky knees and I just had stents installed in one of my cardiac arteries.  I can see where Bell is coming from.

The other thing in the film was the dream the sheriff has about his dad carrying the fire.  That seems to be a theme in McCarthy’s writings, it shows up in his most recent book The Road (soon to be a movie) as well.

 
Jatheist
 
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Jatheist
Total Posts:  44
Joined  13-05-2009
 
 
 
04 June 2009 20:16
 

An offering to cinematic greatness..


Walter Sobchak: I’m saying, I see what you’re getting at, Dude, he kept the money. My point is, here we are, it’s shabbas, the sabbath, which I’m allowed to break only if it’s a matter of life or death…
The Dude: Will you come off it, Walter? You’re not even fucking Jewish, man.
Walter Sobchak: What the fuck are you talkin’ about?
The Dude: Man, you’re fucking Polish Catholic…
Walter Sobchak: What the fuck are you talking about? I converted when I married Cynthia! Come on, Dude!
The Dude: Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah…
Walter Sobchak: And you know this!
The Dude: Yeah, and five fucking years ago you were divorced.
Walter Sobchak: So what are you saying? When you get divorced you turn in your library card? You get a new license? You stop being Jewish?
The Dude: It’s all a part of your sick Cynthia thing, man. Taking care of her fucking dog. Going to her fucking synagogue. You’re living in the fucking past.
Walter Sobchak: Three thousand years of beautiful tradition, from Moses to Sandy Koufax…
[shouting]
Walter Sobchak: You’re goddamn right I’m living in the fucking past!

 
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