Woo?

 
saralynn
 
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saralynn
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06 May 2011 11:22
 

I’ve been reading quite a bit about Buddhism lately and I’m puzzled by the implications of the term “Buddha-mind” and"big mind” vs “small mind” It all sounds a bit mystical to me.  Is it?  Or is it just practical?  Get rid of craving and you’ll feel blissful….(as long as you don’t get attached to the bliss)

 
robbrownsyd
 
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robbrownsyd
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06 May 2011 11:34
 
saralynn - 06 May 2011 09:22 AM

I’ve been reading quite a bit about Buddhism lately and I’m puzzled by the implications of the term “Buddha-mind” and"big mind” vs “small mind” It all sounds a bit mystical to me.  Is it?  Or is it just practical?  Get rid of craving and you’ll feel blissful….(as long as you don’t get attached to the bliss)

Yeah, it seems that’s the trick, Saralynn. Non-attachment. Nice if you can find it. But if you do, don’t get too attached to it.

 
robbrownsyd
 
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robbrownsyd
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06 May 2011 11:44
 

Not saying that Buddhism is not the most useful and the least offensive of the traditional/ancient spiritual./philosophical systems. There’s a lot to be said for meditation and trying to control harmful and/or distracting cravings so that one can focus on what supports inner growth and wellbeing. But as the title of your thread suggests, even buddhism can get bogged down in woo. I like Theravada buddism that posits no god, no soul. Without those the risk of attachment to woo is reduced.  Just my opinion, of course. Stuka and others know much more about Buddhism and it’s various manifestations than me so they could no doubt provide some helpful or enlightening comments here. Just don’t get attached to them.

 
robbrownsyd
 
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robbrownsyd
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06 May 2011 12:51
 
Kenneth - 06 May 2011 10:46 AM
saralynn - 06 May 2011 09:22 AM

I’ve been reading quite a bit about Buddhism lately and I’m puzzled by the implications of the term “Buddha-mind” and"big mind” vs “small mind” It all sounds a bit mystical to me.  Is it?  Or is it just practical?  Get rid of craving and you’ll feel blissful….(as long as you don’t get attached to the bliss)

You’ll find those who do in fact make dubious ontological/metaphysical claims regarding those and other related terms, thus relegating them into the realm of “mysticism”. Others may attempt to dissuade you of the idea that those have any mystical significance or are matters of belief, but rather describe a kind of “direct realization”. Both strains of rhetoric, however, call for a suspension of disbelief and gradual indoctrination which I personally consider to be dangerous, although I also value meditation and various other aspects of Buddhist philosophy/practice. In my opinion, no one is ever going to get rid of craving or feel blissful pemanently, nor should they strive to. Recognizing and coming to terms with that is probably the best one can do; reification of terms such as “Buddha-mind” are more likely to become a source of attachment than a means of abandoning it.

Yup, Kenneth. Guess that’s what I was trying to say.

Damn! Why am I such a wordy old queen?