Stevie Ray Vaughan vs. Jimi Hendrix

 
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27 October 2013 01:11
 

As great as JH was, he could not match the technical proficiency of SRV.  Here’s Voodoo Child by SRV.  If you compare it to JH’s original version, there’s no comparison.  SRV wins.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sF2ZqlPNuqU

 
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27 October 2013 01:22
 
 
cunjevoi
 
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cunjevoi
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27 October 2013 01:38
 

Both brilliant and 1000 times better than I could ever be. SRV’s playing is impeccable. Extremely impressive and error free.

He was truly amazing - absolutely - but Hendrix had something other than just technical proficiency, IMO. Perhaps a combination of groove, feel, swagger and flare. Jimi’s innovation makes him the best.

Vaughan’s fashion sense wall all over the shop too.

 
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27 October 2013 01:56
 

I’m with cunj—SRV probably had the edge in pure technical proficiency, but Hendrix was much more visionary in how he used the electric guitar and all its possibilities. His musical palette was much broader, and he was a much more interesting songwriter.

Nothing against SRV—or his brother, whom I once saw with the Fabulous Thunderbirds—but Hendrix was a true visionary. In fact, I sometimes think his technical proficiency as a guitarist has somewhat overshadowed his other gifts, paradoxically diminishing his status as an artist. But that’s just me.

 
 
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27 October 2013 02:06
 

Yeah, there’s probably no one in the history of the planet who could have done this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opkOJrINJIA

Aw shucks.

 
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27 October 2013 03:00
 

I prefer Jimi’s sloppiness.  There’s something genuine in it.  Jimi’s greatness is not his proficiency but in coming up with the ideas in the first place - in 1967, when everything he did with a guitar were considered technical mistakes.

 
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27 October 2013 03:09
 
Skipshot - 27 October 2013 02:00 AM

I prefer Jimi’s sloppiness.  There’s something genuine in it.  Jimi’s greatness is not his proficiency but in coming up with the ideas in the first place - in 1967, when everything he did with a guitar were considered technical mistakes.

Valid point. He was the innovator.  His first album - Are You Experienced - was phenomenal - one of the best ever. Some of the songs:  Hey Joe, Purple Haze, Fire, Foxy Lady, Manic Depression, The Wind Cries Mary .... hard to top that list.

[ Edited: 27 October 2013 03:11 by EN]
 
Nhoj Morley
 
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27 October 2013 04:02
 

If Stevie Ray is likened to a cruise ship captain, then Jimi is Thor Heyerdahl.

 
 
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31 October 2013 18:35
 

IMO SRV was a brilliant blues guitarist and he is best compared to other blues guitarists. Though Hendrix was of course fundamentally a blues player electrified, and amplified, it is sort of an apple orange comparison.

SRV was a picker. Like Johnny Winter, Alvin Lee, Clapton, and many many others. Jimi could have been that as well, but he had a much broader vision for his music.

Personally I don’t see how anything compares to the original Voodoo Child. Especially the wah wah peddle at the beginning.

Bruce just prefers SRV because he was from Texas.  tongue wink

How about All Along The Watch Tower? Hendrix or Dylan?

 
 
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01 December 2013 23:03
 

Hi all,

I am new here and still busy with lots of reading here and there.This topic strikes me since I am a guitar player myself.
Personally I think that Hendrix wrote the book for electric guitar playing. Simple as that. But I will try not to be one-sided.
As a (part time) guitar teacher I have to divide stuff to be learned into stuff for: beginner, intermediate and advanced player.
So this is the basics ... after that (on higher levels) it becomes more difficult. “Good” and “professional” is not necessarily the same.

There are professional players that I consider “nothing special” meaning that if I practised real hard, I could do it.
A lot of the heavy rock / metal players of the 80s all sounded the same, super fast and totally exchangable, no soul, no identity..
Then there are those that I consider really good - I guess of your average CD collection I would say that of 20% of the guitar players.
And then ... there are those who are outstanding ... they play in a league of their own. Those guys sound original and individual like a human voice..

And here I simply can not really say this one or that one is better ... simply because they are different in style and playing attitude.
They have their strengthes and even weaknesses, yet they are immediately recognizable and play on an unbelievable level.
Among them are some that can play Hendrix: Eric Johnson, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Uli Jon Roth (formerly with german band Scorpions), etc ...
What makes SRV stand out is that he is not only imitating Hendrix, he makes those songs his own - big thing really.
This makes him unique for sure but does it make him “better”? In my eyes you can not compare players of such outstanding level.

Mark Knopfler (Dire Straits) plays with his fingers instead of a plektrum. Eddie VanHalen uses “tapping” very often. Dickey Betts (Allman Brothers Band) probably doesn’t even know how to do this, yet he is the master of “what can you get out of a simple pentatonic scale”. Keith Richards is the master of the rhythm guitar. Lindsay Buckingham (Fleetwood Mac) is very underrated but totally unique in what he does. Carlos Santana - you hear it’s him after 3 notes. George Benson is a jazz player who is a nightmare for teachers because his right hand playing neglects every rulebook. Billy Gibbons of ZZ TOP - what he plays is technically not soooo difficult, the problem is HOW he plays it, with attitude and feel. And the list goes on…

I remember a quote of a rock journalist talking about the odd “top 100 guitarists ever” lists. He said: between no 2 and no 100, you can argue who is “better” or “more your cup of tea” ... but the no 1 spot is reserved ... for Jimi Hendrix. I sympathize with this point of view.

 
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24 September 2017 08:07
 
EN - 27 October 2013 01:11 AM

As great as JH was, he could not match the technical proficiency of SRV.  Here’s Voodoo Child by SRV.  If you compare it to JH’s original version, there’s no comparison.  SRV wins.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sF2ZqlPNuqU

PBS just aired a documentary on Jimi Hendrix and in it was a brief interview with a sound engineer about Jimi’s sloppiness.  The engineer said the sloppiness was deliberate, and he separated the parts of a solo in which Jimi did the lead and rhythm, and the lead was sloppy but the rhythm was fine.  The engineer then mentioned that the sloppiness is technically proficient for Jimi, and every sound he made with a guitar was meant to be made, clean or dirty.

[ Edited: 25 September 2017 00:25 by Skipshot]
 
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24 September 2017 10:11
 
Skipshot - 24 September 2017 08:07 AM
EN - 27 October 2013 01:11 AM

As great as JH was, he could not match the technical proficiency of SRV.  Here’s Voodoo Child by SRV.  If you compare it to JH’s original version, there’s no comparison.  SRV wins.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sF2ZqlPNuqU

PBS just aired a documentary on Jimi Hendrix and in it was a brief interview with a sound engineer about Jimi’s sloppiness.  The engineer said the sloppiness was diliberate, and he separated the parts of a solo in which Jimi did the lead and rhythm, and the lead was sloppy but the rhythm was fine.  The engineer then mentioned that the sloppiness is technically proficient for Jimi, and every sound he made with a guitar was meant to be made, clean or dirty.

Reminds me a bit of Led Zeppelin—Jimmy Page was really clever at making their records sound great by avoiding too much perfection; there was always a bit of sonic fuzz and rough-around-the-edge quality to the mix and whatnot. He was incredibly meticulous about it, yet their records never sound “fussed-over” if that makes sense.

 
 
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24 September 2017 18:13
 
bigredfutbol - 24 September 2017 10:11 AM
Skipshot - 24 September 2017 08:07 AM
EN - 27 October 2013 01:11 AM

As great as JH was, he could not match the technical proficiency of SRV.  Here’s Voodoo Child by SRV.  If you compare it to JH’s original version, there’s no comparison.  SRV wins.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sF2ZqlPNuqU

PBS just aired a documentary on Jimi Hendrix and in it was a brief interview with a sound engineer about Jimi’s sloppiness.  The engineer said the sloppiness was diliberate, and he separated the parts of a solo in which Jimi did the lead and rhythm, and the lead was sloppy but the rhythm was fine.  The engineer then mentioned that the sloppiness is technically proficient for Jimi, and every sound he made with a guitar was meant to be made, clean or dirty.

Reminds me a bit of Led Zeppelin—Jimmy Page was really clever at making their records sound great by avoiding too much perfection; there was always a bit of sonic fuzz and rough-around-the-edge quality to the mix and whatnot. He was incredibly meticulous about it, yet their records never sound “fussed-over” if that makes sense.

Can’t believe this thread has been resurrected.  I would still put Jimi at the number one position of rock guitarists, just because of his creativity and originality, and how he changed music.  My only point was on SRV’s technical proficiency, and I still think he takes Voodoo Child to a higher level.  That being said, Jimi was great, and deserves his general number one ranking. The other Jimmy (Page), was also great, but I’ve got SRV higher than him in my top 10 list. Just my opinion. Of course, I’m biased.

 

 
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24 September 2017 19:13
 
EN - 24 September 2017 06:13 PM
bigredfutbol - 24 September 2017 10:11 AM
Skipshot - 24 September 2017 08:07 AM
EN - 27 October 2013 01:11 AM

As great as JH was, he could not match the technical proficiency of SRV.  Here’s Voodoo Child by SRV.  If you compare it to JH’s original version, there’s no comparison.  SRV wins.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sF2ZqlPNuqU

PBS just aired a documentary on Jimi Hendrix and in it was a brief interview with a sound engineer about Jimi’s sloppiness.  The engineer said the sloppiness was diliberate, and he separated the parts of a solo in which Jimi did the lead and rhythm, and the lead was sloppy but the rhythm was fine.  The engineer then mentioned that the sloppiness is technically proficient for Jimi, and every sound he made with a guitar was meant to be made, clean or dirty.

Reminds me a bit of Led Zeppelin—Jimmy Page was really clever at making their records sound great by avoiding too much perfection; there was always a bit of sonic fuzz and rough-around-the-edge quality to the mix and whatnot. He was incredibly meticulous about it, yet their records never sound “fussed-over” if that makes sense.

Can’t believe this thread has been resurrected.  I would still put Jimi at the number one position of rock guitarists, just because of his creativity and originality, and how he changed music.  My only point was on SRV’s technical proficiency, and I still think he takes Voodoo Child to a higher level.  That being said, Jimi was great, and deserves his general number one ranking. The other Jimmy (Page), was also great, but I’ve got SRV higher than him in my top 10 list. Just my opinion. Of course, I’m biased.

 


I wouldn’t argue with putting SRV above Page, particularly if you’re focusing on technique and playing. Page at his zenith was all about producing great riffs—his solos aren’t really the highlight of Led Zep’s records the way one listens to SRV to hear him really tear it up.

Page was an underrated producer, though—he had an incredible vision for how the ultimate hard rock band should sound and man did he pull it off.