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What is Critical Thinking?

 
Jefe
 
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Jefe
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18 July 2014 00:13
 
EN - 17 July 2014 09:19 PM

I endorse Jefe’s post.  Don’t think I could add much to that.

My question would be “is critical thinking the only way that information can be acquired?”

I also think that it is interesting that nhoj would start such a thread.  Unique, it seems.

I don’t know that ‘critical thinking’ on its own is a way of acquiring knowledge.

There’s only one real way we acquire knowledge.  We learn.  Some things we learn are false or fallacious.  Some things we learn appear to work or act as false positives.  Some things we learn partially - leaving us incomplete information about ramifications.  And some things we think we learn, when, in fact, the opposite occurs.

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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18 July 2014 00:37
 
Jefe - 17 July 2014 10:13 PM
EN - 17 July 2014 09:19 PM

I endorse Jefe’s post.  Don’t think I could add much to that.

My question would be “is critical thinking the only way that information can be acquired?”

I also think that it is interesting that nhoj would start such a thread.  Unique, it seems.

I don’t know that ‘critical thinking’ on its own is a way of acquiring knowledge.

There’s only one real way we acquire knowledge.  We learn.  Some things we learn are false or fallacious.  Some things we learn appear to work or act as false positives.  Some things we learn partially - leaving us incomplete information about ramifications.  And some things we think we learn, when, in fact, the opposite occurs.

Your Rumsfeldian response only lacks the observation that “some things we don’t know that we don’t learn.”

 
Antisocialdarwinist
 
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Antisocialdarwinist
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18 July 2014 00:41
 

I’d say that critical thinking is the process of arriving (or attempting to arrive) at conclusions based on material evidence and verifiable facts. As opposed to arriving at conclusions based on biases, beliefs and preferences.

If I conclude that Obama is a lousy president because he’s a nigger, that’s not critical thinking—because my conclusion depends on my (figuratively, here!) anti-black bias.

If I conclude that Obama is a lousy president because he failed to follow through on his promise to have an open and transparent administration—and I base my conclusion on specific facts about his promise and specific evidence of his administration’s non-openness and non-transparency—that, in my opinion, would be critical thinking. Because my conclusion depends on facts and evidence.

 
 
GAD
 
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GAD
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18 July 2014 03:43
 

I’d say it’s a process whose goal is to derive the best solution to a given problem.

 
 
bbearren
 
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bbearren
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18 July 2014 09:11
 
Nhoj Morley - 17 July 2014 03:22 PM

What separates an objective conclusion from an subjective conclusion?

How stuff works.

 
 
Jefe
 
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Jefe
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18 July 2014 09:41
 
EN - 17 July 2014 10:37 PM
Jefe - 17 July 2014 10:13 PM
EN - 17 July 2014 09:19 PM

I endorse Jefe’s post.  Don’t think I could add much to that.

My question would be “is critical thinking the only way that information can be acquired?”

I also think that it is interesting that nhoj would start such a thread.  Unique, it seems.

I don’t know that ‘critical thinking’ on its own is a way of acquiring knowledge.

There’s only one real way we acquire knowledge.  We learn.  Some things we learn are false or fallacious.  Some things we learn appear to work or act as false positives.  Some things we learn partially - leaving us incomplete information about ramifications.  And some things we think we learn, when, in fact, the opposite occurs.

Your Rumsfeldian response only lacks the observation that “some things we don’t know that we don’t learn.”

Rumsfeldian?  You think there are non-learning ways of acquiring information?

 
 
SkepticX
 
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SkepticX
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18 July 2014 10:24
 
Nhoj Morley - 17 July 2014 03:22 PM

What separates an objective conclusion from an subjective conclusion?


This is the key.

- sub·jec·tive
- [suhb-jek-tiv]
- adjective
-
- 1. existing in the mind; belonging to the thinking subject rather than to the object of thought (opposed to objective ).
- 2. pertaining to or characteristic of an individual; personal; individual: a subjective evaluation.
- 3. placing excessive emphasis on one’s own moods, attitudes, opinions, etc.; unduly egocentric.
- 4. Philosophy . relating to or of the nature of an object as it is known in the mind as distinct from a thing in itself.
- 5. relating to properties or specific conditions of the mind as distinguished from general or universal experience.

Critical thinking (also science) is mostly about actively/conscientiously correcting for that stuff ...

In order to gain understanding from this stuff:

- ob·jec·tive
- [uhb-jek-tiv]
- adjective
-
- 4. being the object or goal of one’s efforts or actions.
- 5. not influenced by personal feelings, interpretations, or prejudice; based on facts; unbiased: an objective opinion.
- 6. intent upon or dealing with things external to the mind rather than with thoughts or feelings, as a person or a book.
- 7. being the object of perception or thought; belonging to the object of thought rather than to the thinking subject (opposed to subjective ).
- 8. of or pertaining to something that can be known, or to something that is an object or a part of an object; existing independent of thought or an observer as part of reality.

We’re very smart critters, as critters go, and our nature is to see things in the way we choose to see them (i.e. subjectively), so we had to create an elaborate system with internal checks and balances and all that kinda shite in order to neutralize that aspect of our nature. This is why science/critical thinking and religious faith don’t mix so well—religious faith is all about empowering and validating the way we choose to see things over the way things are.

 
 
jdrnd
 
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jdrnd
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18 July 2014 10:31
 

This is a very interesting thread.

 
Jb8989
 
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Jb8989
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18 July 2014 11:21
 
Nhoj Morley - 17 July 2014 10:01 PM

Yes, I’m up to something.

If you’re attempting to critically think your way out of your basement, you should know that there are easier ways.

 
 
The Voice of Reason
 
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The Voice of Reason
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18 July 2014 11:54
 

crit·i·cal think·ing
noun
the objective analysis and evaluation of an issue in order to form a judgment.


Was I not supposed to just google the definition?

 
 
SkepticX
 
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SkepticX
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18 July 2014 12:28
 
The Voice of Reason - 18 July 2014 09:54 AM

Was I not supposed to just google the definition?


Yeah ... you did it wrong.

Wrong responding is what that is.

Yup.

cool smile

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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18 July 2014 12:54
 
Jefe - 18 July 2014 07:41 AM
EN - 17 July 2014 10:37 PM
Jefe - 17 July 2014 10:13 PM
EN - 17 July 2014 09:19 PM

I endorse Jefe’s post.  Don’t think I could add much to that.

My question would be “is critical thinking the only way that information can be acquired?”

I also think that it is interesting that nhoj would start such a thread.  Unique, it seems.

I don’t know that ‘critical thinking’ on its own is a way of acquiring knowledge.

There’s only one real way we acquire knowledge.  We learn.  Some things we learn are false or fallacious.  Some things we learn appear to work or act as false positives.  Some things we learn partially - leaving us incomplete information about ramifications.  And some things we think we learn, when, in fact, the opposite occurs.

Your Rumsfeldian response only lacks the observation that “some things we don’t know that we don’t learn.”

Rumsfeldian?  You think there are non-learning ways of acquiring information?

No, the post just reminded me of the “unknown unknowns” days.

 
Nhoj Morley
 
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Nhoj Morley
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18 July 2014 14:10
 

No need to google it.

I am interested in how the term manifests in my favorite group of living minds.


Here’s a sidebar:

Can one engage in critical thinking unconsciously as in The Eureka Moment?

The religious view is that revelation comes from beyond and is a different form of learning than critical thinking. Can the non-religious have a revelation from within and does critical thinking play a role in revelation if that is one’s regular conscious inclination?

 
 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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18 July 2014 14:18
 

With my “values goggles” on I’d say:

Placing a high value on logic and evidence when approaching the world.

 
 
Mike78
 
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Mike78
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18 July 2014 14:51
 
Nhoj Morley - 18 July 2014 12:10 PM

No need to google it.

I am interested in how the term manifests in my favorite group of living minds.


Here’s a sidebar:

Can one engage in critical thinking unconsciously as in The Eureka Moment?

The religious view is that revelation comes from beyond and is a different form of learning than critical thinking. Can the non-religious have a revelation from within and does critical thinking play a role in revelation if that is one’s regular conscious inclination?

I don’t think there’s such a thing as unconscious critical thinking.  Even when I achieve physical arousal while sleeping, the “eureka” occurs after I’m awake and before I make my way to the water closet.

 
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