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The Black Hole

 
bbearren
 
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bbearren
Total Posts:  3579
Joined  20-11-2013
 
 
 
15 July 2018 10:33
 
Jan_CAN - 14 July 2018 09:29 PM

Bruce, it sounds like a wonderful tribute to your beloved wife, and I’m glad to hear that you have plenty of support from friends and family.

MARTIN_UK - 14 July 2018 11:54 PM

Sounds like it was my kind of get together.

Skipshot - 15 July 2018 07:42 AM
MARTIN_UK - 14 July 2018 11:54 PM

Sounds like it was my kind of get together.

Mine, too.

No pole dancing, but it did indeed turn into a party early on, with plenty of laughter rolling away the tears.

 
 
Jefe
 
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Jefe
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15 July 2018 11:21
 

Very sorry for your loss, Bruce.  Condolences from me and mine to you and yours.

 
 
LadyJane
 
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LadyJane
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18 July 2018 10:28
 

My life before you I can hardly recall
You saw I was guarded and broke down my wall
When I was travelling in search of the truth
You made up for everything lost in my youth
Over the years as we blended as one
Sharing some heartache or embracing great fun
You extended your love and gave it a name
Then let me be me so I showed you the same
Now in an instant you’ve vanished away
I’m swimming in thoughts yet have nothing to say
It’s crippling to think that you’re not around
I jump out of my skin with each startling sound
I’m spinning in circles when I want to be still
Surrounded by spaces I can’t seem to fill
I used to find comfort in faith and belief
And now I am lost in the shadows of grief
I stumble along with no direction in sight
Where nothing seems real and nothing feels right
I long for your voice or a trace of your scent
The look you would give when you knew what I meant
When will this no longer feel like a dream?
Moving forward alone makes me want to scream
The memories ease the depth of my pain
And gives me the strength to begin again.

 
 
bbearren
 
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bbearren
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18 July 2018 14:02
 

Lovely poem, LadyJane.

I appreciate the expressions of condolence here in this thread.  This community (with all its ilks and ills, ups and downs, ins and outs) is one of the reasons I stay.

 
 
Jb8989
 
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Jb8989
Total Posts:  6152
Joined  31-01-2012
 
 
 
02 October 2018 05:11
 

Just checking in, brother. How’s widowhood treating you? Any tricks to the trade?

 
 
bbearren
 
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bbearren
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02 October 2018 06:44
 
Jb8989 - 02 October 2018 05:11 AM

Just checking in, brother. How’s widowhood treating you?

What’s with the “brother” stuff?  Do you miss talking to your monkey?  Looking for used-up, tossed-aside pumpkins?

Just pick out one of your preconceptions and go with that.

Any tricks to the trade?

None that you could master.

bbearren - 26 June 2018 15:33 - There will indeed be times when I will need to comfort family and close friends.  Knowing that she is free from discomfort and suffering, that, in and of itself, is an abundance of comfort for me, in addition to my faith.

Our children are working through their feelings, wanting hugs often, and we’re talking about those feelings whenever the need arises.  We are a bit closer now, as one might expect.  My oldest son from my first wife is actively cultivating a closer relationship than we have enjoyed in the past.  We’ve gone out a couple of times for drinks and pool or darts, as well as a couple of small gatherings at his home for a meal and some music..  I’m also teaching him guitar at his request.

The writing of her book is finished, and it has been published, but I can take pleasure from reading it again at any time.  I have favorite chapters, but the entire book is a great read.  Janet is no longer here, but neither is she gone.

 
 
Jb8989
 
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Jb8989
Total Posts:  6152
Joined  31-01-2012
 
 
 
02 October 2018 07:31
 
bbearren - 02 October 2018 06:44 AM
Jb8989 - 02 October 2018 05:11 AM

Just checking in, brother. How’s widowhood treating you?

What’s with the “brother” stuff?  Do you miss talking to your monkey?  Looking for used-up, tossed-aside pumpkins?

Just pick out one of your preconceptions and go with that.

Any tricks to the trade?

None that you could master.

bbearren - 26 June 2018 15:33 - There will indeed be times when I will need to comfort family and close friends.  Knowing that she is free from discomfort and suffering, that, in and of itself, is an abundance of comfort for me, in addition to my faith.

Our children are working through their feelings, wanting hugs often, and we’re talking about those feelings whenever the need arises.  We are a bit closer now, as one might expect.  My oldest son from my first wife is actively cultivating a closer relationship than we have enjoyed in the past.  We’ve gone out a couple of times for drinks and pool or darts, as well as a couple of small gatherings at his home for a meal and some music..  I’m also teaching him guitar at his request.

The writing of her book is finished, and it has been published, but I can take pleasure from reading it again at any time.  I have favorite chapters, but the entire book is a great read.  Janet is no longer here, but neither is she gone.

Nice!

 
 
bbearren
 
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bbearren
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27 November 2018 12:30
 
Antisocialdarwinist - 27 November 2018 07:47 AM

1. the deficit is a function of both revenue and spending
2. the quantity of bonds that the government has to sell every year is determined by the size of the deficit
3. the law of supply and demand

So far, so good.

Antisocialdarwinist - 22 November 2018 02:33 PM

T-bill yields are determined by supply and demand. When demand for T-bills falls—as in the hypothetical case when investors start worrying about default, or the more realistic case of rising inflation—yields have to rise in order to increase demand. When the supply of T-bills rises—as in the case when the deficit increases and the government needs more money—yields have to rise.

Oops.  Historical data (all those slides included in the statement) suggests that yields do not have to rise.  Demand remains very strong, hence the interest rate remains low.  “During the 2008 financial crisis, despite the crisis developing in the United States, the only asset investors around the world wanted to hold was US dollars and US dollar debt. The yields on the US ten year T-Bill FELL at the height of the crisis.  If there was any investor concern about the stability of the US those yields should have gone up. They went down despite the crisis and the federal debt going up as a result of bailing out the financial sector and the ensuing recession. The whole world, it seemed, wanted dollars and dollar debt despite the US generating the crisis.  Why was this?

Simply because, and quite unlike on the state level, because it controls its own money, the US federal government was able to quickly bail its banks and triage the economy via quantitative easing.  In countries that could not do this, those in the Euro area for example, they were forced to try and balance their budgets. The result in Europe has been plain to see - a massive contraction in economic activity, with those that cut the most seeing the steepest collapse in growth and, paradoxically, the biggest buildup in debts. This is hardly a surprise historically since pretty much all attempts to balance budgets have resulted in recessions or depressions.”

Antisocialdarwinist - 19 November 2018 08:26 AM

My point is that “We have a revenue problem, not a spending problem” is not a fact supported by T-bill yields, as the speaker in your video claims. Unless maybe I’m misinterpreting the “problem?” I’m assuming that the “problem” is the deficit. But maybe his idea of the “problem” is the higher T-bill yields themselves? As long as T-bill yields are low, then we don’t have a problem? But if that’s the case, I don’t see how he can claim we have a revenue “problem,” either.

Yes indeed, you are misinterpreting the “problem” because you are completely ignoring the context of the video, which is “Statement of Mark Blyth, Eastman Professor of Political Economy, The Watson Institute for International Studies and Brown University, Before the Committee on the Budget, United States Senate, Hearing on “The Benefits of a Balanced Budget

In the context of “The Benefits of a Balanced Budget”, “What we have is a funding crisis, not a spending crisis. The problem is too low revenues, not too high spending. The US has plenty of spare tax capacity, especially at the top.”

 
 
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