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How Buddhism differs from Christianity

 
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13 January 2017 15:01
 
unsmoked - 13 January 2017 11:45 AM

How Buddhism differs from Christianity

Miracles and superstition, fostered by Bible stories, are important to most Christians.  They say that Jesus’ miracles prove his divinity; demonstrate his superiority over other teachers and sages.

Miracles and superstition do not belong to the essential nature or constitution of Buddhism.

 

I don’t think there is a huge difference here either, although some difference exists. Both Christianity and Buddhism acknowledge what we would call “miracles” as a real thing, both Jesus and Buddha were supposed to have displayed miraculous powers, and both said that these should not be a primary focus, that spiritual development was far more important (this was actually emphasized to me a great deal growing up in the Orthodox Church - there are a couple of parables where Jesus heals both soul and body and emphasizes that the former is more urgent and the greater miracle). I will say that in Buddhism any ‘showing off’ of extraordinary powers has been downplayed to the point of it being taboo, whereas in Christianity miracles are ‘allowed’ with a ‘but let’s remember where our true focus should be’ attitude. Then again, in Buddhism extraordinary powers are thought to be more common than they are in Christianity, where miracles are considered a great rarity.


To me that is more minor than major difference and all kinda comes out in the wash anyways (miracles are rare and should be appreciated but kept in perspective; miracles are common but should be functionally ignored,) but I suppose it is a difference.

 
 
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14 January 2017 09:55
 

How Buddhism differs from Christianity

Buddha didn’t say that the body, personality, memory will continue beyond death of the brain.  Life of ‘me’ after death is a major and cherished idea among Christians and this preposterous* notion is promoted in the Bible.

Buddha said, “One who has no longing for this world or another, who is free from craving and aloof from detachment, is one that I call insightful.”

Thomas Cleary, author of a book called, ‘DHAMMAPADA - The Sayings of Buddha’  -  comments about this aphorism:  “Apparently many of the Hindu yogis were trapped by longing for other worlds.  Abandoning otherworldly longings is a hallmark of Buddhist teaching, practice, and enlightenment.”

*preposterous  adj  :  contrary to nature, reason, or common sense :  ABSURD   -  (Webster)

 
 
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14 January 2017 11:05
 
unsmoked - 14 January 2017 09:55 AM

How Buddhism differs from Christianity

Buddha didn’t say that the body, personality, memory will continue beyond death of the brain.  Life of ‘me’ after death is a major and cherished idea among Christians and this preposterous* notion is promoted in the Bible.

Buddha said, “One who has no longing for this world or another, who is free from craving and aloof from detachment, is one that I call insightful.”

Thomas Cleary, author of a book called, ‘DHAMMAPADA - The Sayings of Buddha’  -  comments about this aphorism:  “Apparently many of the Hindu yogis were trapped by longing for other worlds.  Abandoning otherworldly longings is a hallmark of Buddhist teaching, practice, and enlightenment.”

*preposterous  adj  :  contrary to nature, reason, or common sense :  ABSURD   -  (Webster)


I’m not trying to be contrarian here, but come on, Buddhism teaches reincarnation, which is much more in line with concrete, flesh-and-blood continued existence after death. In Christianity the idea of the afterlife is always left extremely vague.

 
 
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14 January 2017 11:50
 
NL. - 14 January 2017 11:05 AM
unsmoked - 14 January 2017 09:55 AM

How Buddhism differs from Christianity

Buddha didn’t say that the body, personality, memory will continue beyond death of the brain.  Life of ‘me’ after death is a major and cherished idea among Christians and this preposterous* notion is promoted in the Bible.

Buddha said, “One who has no longing for this world or another, who is free from craving and aloof from detachment, is one that I call insightful.”

Thomas Cleary, author of a book called, ‘DHAMMAPADA - The Sayings of Buddha’  -  comments about this aphorism:  “Apparently many of the Hindu yogis were trapped by longing for other worlds.  Abandoning otherworldly longings is a hallmark of Buddhist teaching, practice, and enlightenment.”

*preposterous  adj  :  contrary to nature, reason, or common sense :  ABSURD   -  (Webster)


I’m not trying to be contrarian here, but come on, Buddhism teaches reincarnation, which is much more in line with concrete, flesh-and-blood continued existence after death. In Christianity the idea of the afterlife is always left extremely vague.

If you know what the ‘self’ is, then you will understand Buddhist references to reincarnation.  If you don’t know what the self is you will think that you might be a panda, or a ladybug, or a Swedish princess in your next life. 

One of the first questions a Zen master might ask a beginner is, “Who are you?  What do you call yourself?” 

Most people respond superficially, “I am me, who else?”

I know you are not trying to be a contrarian.  It seems to come effortlessly.

 
 
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14 January 2017 12:19
 
unsmoked - 14 January 2017 11:50 AM
NL. - 14 January 2017 11:05 AM
unsmoked - 14 January 2017 09:55 AM

How Buddhism differs from Christianity

Buddha didn’t say that the body, personality, memory will continue beyond death of the brain.  Life of ‘me’ after death is a major and cherished idea among Christians and this preposterous* notion is promoted in the Bible.

Buddha said, “One who has no longing for this world or another, who is free from craving and aloof from detachment, is one that I call insightful.”

Thomas Cleary, author of a book called, ‘DHAMMAPADA - The Sayings of Buddha’  -  comments about this aphorism:  “Apparently many of the Hindu yogis were trapped by longing for other worlds.  Abandoning otherworldly longings is a hallmark of Buddhist teaching, practice, and enlightenment.”

*preposterous  adj  :  contrary to nature, reason, or common sense :  ABSURD   -  (Webster)


I’m not trying to be contrarian here, but come on, Buddhism teaches reincarnation, which is much more in line with concrete, flesh-and-blood continued existence after death. In Christianity the idea of the afterlife is always left extremely vague.

If you know what the ‘self’ is, then you will understand Buddhist references to reincarnation.  If you don’t know what the self is you will think that you might be a panda, or a ladybug, or a Swedish princess in your next life. 

One of the first questions a Zen master might ask a beginner is, “Who are you?  What do you call yourself?” 

Most people respond superficially, “I am me, who else?”


I don’t disagree, and I’ve said this myself. But if you are going to apply nonliteral interpretations to Buddhism, you can do the same for Christianity - again, possibly more easily for Christianity, as Buddhism seems to say more explicitly that you really will reincarnate as another creature so long as you really do take the material world at face value. Christianity is far vaguer about what ‘heaven’ is in the first place (and Buddhism also contains plenty of heaven and hell realms, btw, although I’m not sure if they’re from the original texts or were added later.)

 

I know you are not trying to be a contrarian.  It seems to come effortlessly.


IRL, I care more about people than conceptual truths. Online, just the opposite. I realize I can be indelicate when it comes to bashing away at any perceived inconsistency, apologies if you’d prefer a more congenial ‘standardized narrative’ approach without the Anthropologist on Mars way of relating. It’s just what interests me, in a sort of exploratory way.

 
 
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15 January 2017 09:53
 
NL. - 14 January 2017 11:05 AM

In Christianity the idea of the afterlife is always left extremely vague.

Surely you jest.  What with Jesus’ dead body coming back to life, after he was killed?  Coming out of his tomb and showing his frightened disciples his scars?  I’ve never met a Christian who didn’t think he or she was still going to be alive, lock, stock, and barrel after they died.

 

[ Edited: 15 January 2017 10:02 by unsmoked]
 
 
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15 January 2017 10:49
 
NL. - 14 January 2017 12:19 PM
unsmoked - 14 January 2017 11:50 AM
NL. - 14 January 2017 11:05 AM
unsmoked - 14 January 2017 09:55 AM

How Buddhism differs from Christianity

Buddha didn’t say that the body, personality, memory will continue beyond death of the brain.  Life of ‘me’ after death is a major and cherished idea among Christians and this preposterous* notion is promoted in the Bible.

Buddha said, “One who has no longing for this world or another, who is free from craving and aloof from detachment, is one that I call insightful.”

Thomas Cleary, author of a book called, ‘DHAMMAPADA - The Sayings of Buddha’  -  comments about this aphorism:  “Apparently many of the Hindu yogis were trapped by longing for other worlds.  Abandoning otherworldly longings is a hallmark of Buddhist teaching, practice, and enlightenment.”

*preposterous  adj  :  contrary to nature, reason, or common sense :  ABSURD   -  (Webster)


I’m not trying to be contrarian here, but come on, Buddhism teaches reincarnation, which is much more in line with concrete, flesh-and-blood continued existence after death. In Christianity the idea of the afterlife is always left extremely vague.

If you know what the ‘self’ is, then you will understand Buddhist references to reincarnation.  If you don’t know what the self is you will think that you might be a panda, or a ladybug, or a Swedish princess in your next life. 

One of the first questions a Zen master might ask a beginner is, “Who are you?  What do you call yourself?” 

Most people respond superficially, “I am me, who else?”


I don’t disagree, and I’ve said this myself. But if you are going to apply nonliteral interpretations to Buddhism, you can do the same for Christianity - again, possibly more easily for Christianity, as Buddhism seems to say more explicitly that you really will reincarnate as another creature so long as you really do take the material world at face value. Christianity is far vaguer about what ‘heaven’ is in the first place (and Buddhism also contains plenty of heaven and hell realms, btw, although I’m not sure if they’re from the original texts or were added later.)

 

I know you are not trying to be a contrarian.  It seems to come effortlessly.


IRL, I care more about people than conceptual truths. Online, just the opposite. I realize I can be indelicate when it comes to bashing away at any perceived inconsistency, apologies if you’d prefer a more congenial ‘standardized narrative’ approach without the Anthropologist on Mars way of relating. It’s just what interests me, in a sort of exploratory way.

In his book, ‘WAKING UP’, Sam Harris writes:

“An ability to examine the contents of one’s own consciousness clearly, dispassionately, and nondiscurseively, with sufficient attention to realize that no inner self exists, is a very sophisticated skill.”

Zen master Mazu comments, “. . . That is why scripture says that this body is just made of elements, and its appearance and disappearance is just that of elements, which have no identity.”

As a story goes, someone asked Buddha if there was life after death and Buddha replied, “If you blow out a candle then light it again, is it the same flame or a different flame?”

Worldwide, probably most religious people are reassured and comfortable thinking they are going to be alive [as themselves] after they die.  The Bible reinforces this notion, telling the reader how Jesus spoke of it and demonstrated it by walking out of his tomb and going to heaven. 

A Zen master was given a New Testament to read.  Later, when asked his opinion about Jesus, he replied, “That man was almost enlightened.”  He might have been referring to Bible stories making it clear that Jesus thought that the self (the contents of the brain) was an eternal spirit or identity that would survive the death of the brain.

(Mazu quoted from the book, ‘ZEN ESSENCE - The Science of Freedom’ - translated and edited by Thomas Cleary)

 
 
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15 January 2017 13:29
 
unsmoked - 15 January 2017 10:49 AM

In his book, ‘WAKING UP’, Sam Harris writes:

“An ability to examine the contents of one’s own consciousness clearly, dispassionately, and nondiscurseively, with sufficient attention to realize that no inner self exists, is a very sophisticated skill.”

Zen master Mazu comments, “. . . That is why scripture says that this body is just made of elements, and its appearance and disappearance is just that of elements, which have no identity.”

As a story goes, someone asked Buddha if there was life after death and Buddha replied, “If you blow out a candle then light it again, is it the same flame or a different flame?”

Worldwide, probably most religious people are reassured and comfortable thinking they are going to be alive [as themselves] after they die.  The Bible reinforces this notion, telling the reader how Jesus spoke of it and demonstrated it by walking out of his tomb and going to heaven. 

A Zen master was given a New Testament to read.  Later, when asked his opinion about Jesus, he replied, “That man was almost enlightened.”  He might have been referring to Bible stories making it clear that Jesus thought that the self (the contents of the brain) was an eternal spirit or identity that would survive the death of the brain.

(Mazu quoted from the book, ‘ZEN ESSENCE - The Science of Freedom’ - translated and edited by Thomas Cleary)


I’m confused about what you’re pointing to as a difference here, since you mention an afterlife but clearly both Buddhism and Christianity talk about an afterlife. There are some differences in the afterlife they talk about (in Buddhism you can go to heaven or hell but this is just another finite incarnation in samsara, to be followed by another), but they both contain one. Maybe you are talking specifically about Zen as a subset of Buddhism, and not Buddhism per se? (Implying there is something like a Mormonism / Christian distinction there, in that one school of thought branched out significantly from the other?). That I cannot speak to - I was under the impression that Zen followed the same general lines of thinking as Buddhism but perhaps there is a split there, historically, that I am unaware of, and maybe there is a very different line of thought in Zen, specifically, regarding an afterlife. I’ll try to Google it later if I have time.

 
 
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16 January 2017 10:24
 

How Buddhism differs from Christianity

Zen master Mazu comments:  “. . . That is why scripture says that this body is just made of elements, and its appearance and disappearance is just that of elements, which have no identity.”  (end quote)

I think you could read every page of the Bible, all the Christian scriptures, the sermons and writings of all the popes, saints, and preachers - including Billy Graham’s thousands of newspaper columns, all the latter day Christian evangelists and authors and never find any remark like this one of Mazu’s.

Zen master Fenyang comments:  “Few people believe their inherent mind is Buddha.  Most will not take this seriously, and therefore are cramped.”

When asked about the afterlife, Buddha replied, “When you blow out a candle then light it again, is it the same flame or a different flame?”

NL, how about you?  As you know, other Christians on the forum believe that after they die they will still be alive with the same memories, personality and [ideal] appearance, able to greet and be welcomed by all their ‘departed’ loved ones . . . able to meet Jesus etc.  Brother Mario used to say that life wouldn’t be worth living if this notion wasn’t true.

quote:  “The various teachings and techniques of buddhas and Zen masters are only set forth so that you will individually step back into yourself, understand your own original mind and see your own original nature, so that you reach a state of great rest, peace, and happiness.”  -  Zen master Yuansou

(Mazu, Fenyang, and Yuansou quoted from the book, ‘ZEN ESSENCE - The Science of Freedom’  -  translated and edited by Thomas Cleary

[ Edited: 16 January 2017 10:28 by unsmoked]
 
 
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16 January 2017 10:54
 
unsmoked - 16 January 2017 10:24 AM

How Buddhism differs from Christianity

Zen master Mazu comments:  “. . . That is why scripture says that this body is just made of elements, and its appearance and disappearance is just that of elements, which have no identity.”  (end quote)

I think you could read every page of the Bible, all the Christian scriptures, the sermons and writings of all the popes, saints, and preachers - including Billy Graham’s thousands of newspaper columns, all the latter day Christian evangelists and authors and never find any remark like this one of Mazu’s.

Zen master Fenyang comments:  “Few people believe their inherent mind is Buddha.  Most will not take this seriously, and therefore are cramped.”

When asked about the afterlife, Buddha replied, “When you blow out a candle then light it again, is it the same flame or a different flame?”

NL, how about you?  As you know, other Christians on the forum believe that after they die they will still be alive with the same memories, personality and [ideal] appearance, able to greet and be welcomed by all their ‘departed’ loved ones . . . able to meet Jesus etc.  Brother Mario used to say that life wouldn’t be worth living if this notion wasn’t true.

quote:  “The various teachings and techniques of buddhas and Zen masters are only set forth so that you will individually step back into yourself, understand your own original mind and see your own original nature, so that you reach a state of great rest, peace, and happiness.”  -  Zen master Yuansou

(Mazu, Fenyang, and Yuansou quoted from the book, ‘ZEN ESSENCE - The Science of Freedom’  -  translated and edited by Thomas Cleary


Again, if you are talking about a few specific Zen masters, ok, but that is not “Buddhism” as a whole, and I can in turn talk about the views of a few specific Christian theologists, which have been widely varied over the years. I have actually studied under American Buddhist teachers and people like Robert Thurman do in fact teach about reincarnation and other realms, no two ways about it. This is central to Buddhism. Buddha on the topic:

“Since there actually is another world, one who holds the view ‘there is no other world’ has wrong view. Since there actually is another world, one who intends ‘there is no other world’ has wrong intention. Since there actually is another world, one who makes the statement ‘there is no other world’ has wrong speech. Since there actually is another world, one who says ‘there is no other world’ is opposed to those arahants who know the other world. Since there actually is another world, one who convinces another ‘there is no other world’ convinces him to accept an untrue Dhamma; and because he convinces another to accept an untrue Dhamma, he praises himself and disparages others. Thus any pure virtue that he formerly had is abandoned and corrupt conduct is substituted. And this wrong view, wrong intention, wrong speech, opposition to noble ones, convincing another to accept an untrue Dhamma, and self-praise and disparagement of others—these several evil unwholesome states thus come into being with wrong view as their condition.


Again, if you are talking about very specific schools of thought within Buddhism, offshoots if you will, that’s fine, but let’s say that - just trying to get a clear idea of what you’re talking about.

 
 
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17 January 2017 08:45
 
NL. - 16 January 2017 10:54 AM
unsmoked - 16 January 2017 10:24 AM

How Buddhism differs from Christianity

Zen master Mazu comments:  “. . . That is why scripture says that this body is just made of elements, and its appearance and disappearance is just that of elements, which have no identity.”  (end quote)

I think you could read every page of the Bible, all the Christian scriptures, the sermons and writings of all the popes, saints, and preachers - including Billy Graham’s thousands of newspaper columns, all the latter day Christian evangelists and authors and never find any remark like this one of Mazu’s.

Zen master Fenyang comments:  “Few people believe their inherent mind is Buddha.  Most will not take this seriously, and therefore are cramped.”

When asked about the afterlife, Buddha replied, “When you blow out a candle then light it again, is it the same flame or a different flame?”

NL, how about you?  As you know, other Christians on the forum believe that after they die they will still be alive with the same memories, personality and [ideal] appearance, able to greet and be welcomed by all their ‘departed’ loved ones . . . able to meet Jesus etc.  Brother Mario used to say that life wouldn’t be worth living if this notion wasn’t true.

quote:  “The various teachings and techniques of buddhas and Zen masters are only set forth so that you will individually step back into yourself, understand your own original mind and see your own original nature, so that you reach a state of great rest, peace, and happiness.”  -  Zen master Yuansou

(Mazu, Fenyang, and Yuansou quoted from the book, ‘ZEN ESSENCE - The Science of Freedom’  -  translated and edited by Thomas Cleary


Again, if you are talking about a few specific Zen masters, ok, but that is not “Buddhism” as a whole, and I can in turn talk about the views of a few specific Christian theologists, which have been widely varied over the years. I have actually studied under American Buddhist teachers and people like Robert Thurman do in fact teach about reincarnation and other realms, no two ways about it. This is central to Buddhism. Buddha on the topic:

“Since there actually is another world, one who holds the view ‘there is no other world’ has wrong view. Since there actually is another world, one who intends ‘there is no other world’ has wrong intention. Since there actually is another world, one who makes the statement ‘there is no other world’ has wrong speech. Since there actually is another world, one who says ‘there is no other world’ is opposed to those arahants who know the other world. Since there actually is another world, one who convinces another ‘there is no other world’ convinces him to accept an untrue Dhamma; and because he convinces another to accept an untrue Dhamma, he praises himself and disparages others. Thus any pure virtue that he formerly had is abandoned and corrupt conduct is substituted. And this wrong view, wrong intention, wrong speech, opposition to noble ones, convincing another to accept an untrue Dhamma, and self-praise and disparagement of others—these several evil unwholesome states thus come into being with wrong view as their condition.


Again, if you are talking about very specific schools of thought within Buddhism, offshoots if you will, that’s fine, but let’s say that - just trying to get a clear idea of what you’re talking about.

As a thinking Zennist, which, I admit, is already an oxymoron, this is the longest exchange I’ve ever had with a New Age inhabitant of Never Land, a realm where Christianity and Buddhism are homogenized.

homogenize  vb  1 a : to blend (diverse elements) into a uniform mixture -  (Webster)

Zen master Yuanwu takes your side:  “Knowledge and truth merge, and mind and objects join.  There is no profundity to be considered deep and no marvel to be considered wondrous.  When it comes to practical application, you naturally know how to harmonize everything.”

Later, although not referencing God, (which Billy Graham would notice right away) Yuanwu adds:  “The most important thing is for people of great faculties and sharp wisdom to turn the light of mind around and shine back and clearly awaken to this mind before a single thought is born.  This mind can produce all world-transcending and worldly phenomena.  When it is forever stamped with enlightenment, your inner heart is independent and transcendent and brimming over with life.  As soon as you rouse your conditioned mind and set errant thoughts moving, then you have obscured this fundamental clarity.”

(Yuanwu quoted from the book, ‘ZEN LETTERS - Teachings of Yuanwu’ - translated by J.C. Cleary and Thomas Cleary)

 

[ Edited: 17 January 2017 08:47 by unsmoked]
 
 
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17 January 2017 11:49
 
unsmoked - 17 January 2017 08:45 AM

As a thinking Zennist, which, I admit, is already an oxymoron, this is the longest exchange I’ve ever had with a New Age inhabitant of Never Land, a realm where Christianity and Buddhism are homogenized.

homogenize  vb  1 a : to blend (diverse elements) into a uniform mixture -  (Webster)

Zen master Yuanwu takes your side:  “Knowledge and truth merge, and mind and objects join.  There is no profundity to be considered deep and no marvel to be considered wondrous.  When it comes to practical application, you naturally know how to harmonize everything.”

Later, although not referencing God, (which Billy Graham would notice right away) Yuanwu adds:  “The most important thing is for people of great faculties and sharp wisdom to turn the light of mind around and shine back and clearly awaken to this mind before a single thought is born.  This mind can produce all world-transcending and worldly phenomena.  When it is forever stamped with enlightenment, your inner heart is independent and transcendent and brimming over with life.  As soon as you rouse your conditioned mind and set errant thoughts moving, then you have obscured this fundamental clarity.”

(Yuanwu quoted from the book, ‘ZEN LETTERS - Teachings of Yuanwu’ - translated by J.C. Cleary and Thomas Cleary)


That would be like if you said, “Apples and oranges are different because one is a fruit and one is a vegetable”, and I said “No, they’re both kinds of fruit”, and you said “Oh, so now you think apples and oranges are the same thing, huh?”.


That said, I should probably allow you a moment of venting as I didn’t think you’d particularly appreciate a passage of Buddha sounding rather like Cotten Mather, so probably my quoting that was harsh. Remember that Buddha (like Christ, in my opinion,) did vary his message somewhat in accordance with his audience, so it is entirely possible that he meant that “from one particular perspective”. That is why I do not subscribe to either Buddhism or Christianity in a traditional way and call myself a “sort of Buddhist” and a “non traditional Christian”. So if you want to have a discussion about our personal interpretations of either of those religions or the role they play in the US, specifically (where Buddhism is often the more liberal, quasi-secular philosophy,) I’m happy to do that, but I just don’t think there’s a case to be made that Zen is some libertarian “go your own way” tradition. If anything it’s been the exact opposite of that, as the whole point is to get you to see that you don’t have an individual self, and to the degree that one protests authoritarian or painful treatment, it could always counter with “Well clearly that’s just your ego talking”. The fact that Americans find it oppressive when a priest convinces someone that hell exists but somehow enlightening when a roshi beats someone with a stick speaks to our cultural paradigms and baggage, not some inherently liberal quality of zen.

 
 
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19 January 2017 10:05
 

How Buddhism is the same as Christianity

“The renowned poet Bo Juyi asked the Bird’s Nest Monk, “What is the Way?”  The Bird’s Nest Monk said, “Don’t do any evils, do all forms of good.”  Bo Juyi said, “Even a three-year-old could say this.”  The Bird’s Nest Monk said, “Though a three-year-old might be able to say it, an eighty-year-old might not be able to carry it out.”

(quoted from the book, ‘ZEN LETTERS - Teachings of Yuanwu’ - translated by J.C. Cleary and Thomas Cleary)

 
 
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20 January 2017 15:20
 
unsmoked - 19 January 2017 10:05 AM

How Buddhism is the same as Christianity

“The renowned poet Bo Juyi asked the Bird’s Nest Monk, “What is the Way?”  The Bird’s Nest Monk said, “Don’t do any evils, do all forms of good.”  Bo Juyi said, “Even a three-year-old could say this.”  The Bird’s Nest Monk said, “Though a three-year-old might be able to say it, an eighty-year-old might not be able to carry it out.”

(quoted from the book, ‘ZEN LETTERS - Teachings of Yuanwu’ - translated by J.C. Cleary and Thomas Cleary)


Well that’s a sweet sentiment. And if you want my “pop culture” opinion of how Buddhism and Christianity differ functionally, in the real world, I think the ancient philosopher Iglesias sums up much in Buddhist philosophy when he says “It was good, it was bad but it was real.” There is no savior in Buddhism because there is no salvation (or rather, perhaps I should say there is a paradox wherein truly realizing there is no salvation is salvation). Christianity frames it in mirror image terms, for the most part. I think Buddhism speaks more from the ‘nibbana’ side looking out (from the POV of emptiness); and Christianity speaks more from the ‘samsara’ side looking out (from the POV of a human). And I’m glad that there are different traditions that speak to different mindsets, so I’ll even say I think that difference is important.

 
 
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03 February 2017 10:15
 

How Buddhism differs from Christianity

Zen master Linji said:

“If you want to perceive and understand objectively, just don’t allow yourself to be confused by people.  Detach from whatever you find inside or outside yourself - detach from religion, tradition, and society, and only then will you attain liberation.  When you are not entangled in things, you pass through freely to autonomy.”

(Linji quoted from the book ‘ZEN ESSENCE - The Science of Freedom’ - translated and edited by Thomas Cleary)

 
 
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