Acceptable Compassionate Interventions?

 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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27 March 2017 10:01
 

(Picking up a theme from a forum discussion concerning the “anti-Islamophobic” motion M103 recently created in Canada.)

I believe that sometimes interventions are called for AND compassionate. For example, we know that kids born to single mothers tend to be not very successful in life. So if we encounter a teenage girl who we suspect is on the path to becoming a single mother, what (if anything), should we do? If we discover a teenager who’s joined the KKK, what should we do? If we suspect that a neighbor wife is being abused, what should we do?

Specifically, I’m pursuing this line of question in regards to what to do about Muslims and Islam, although the same questions could be asked regarding any form of religious and/or political extremists…

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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27 March 2017 10:46
 

If you think someone is being radicalized, you can alert the authorities. If you think they are about to commit a terrorist act, likewise. It’s compassionate for the intended victims.  Also, preventing the subject from committing a terroristic act by notifying law enforcement is compassionate toward him.  He’ll be better off if he is prevented from acting.

 
Brick Bungalow
 
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Brick Bungalow
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27 March 2017 16:47
 

I’m not sure you can qualify compassion as a universal. We might describe compassion in terms of a feeling but compassionate acts rely on the context of an intended outcome.

I think this is important because we have so much toxic ideology still in play. (in my judgment) There are many people who simply don’t share the same goals and so will not reliably find common ground on what counts as an act of compassion.

Do you have some specific goal in mind?

 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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27 March 2017 19:25
 
Brick Bungalow - 27 March 2017 04:47 PM

I’m not sure you can qualify compassion as a universal. We might describe compassion in terms of a feeling but compassionate acts rely on the context of an intended outcome.

I think this is important because we have so much toxic ideology still in play. (in my judgment) There are many people who simply don’t share the same goals and so will not reliably find common ground on what counts as an act of compassion.

Do you have some specific goal in mind?

Yes: to search for compassionate ways to get religious (and/or maybe political), extremists to change their minds.