Some thoughts on Muslims in China

 
CX_Huang
 
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CX_Huang
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17 May 2017 19:38
 

A supermarket was surrounded by Muslims. They threatened and forced the supermarket to withdraw all products related to pork.

A restaurant run by a non-Muslim owner was trashed to a mess and the owner was beaten pretty badly, because the restaurant provided pork in the noodles.

Akhond in a small country called Dongxiang confiscated all the televisions from locals because certain TV programs violated Sharia Law.

Many Muslim students asked for their own restaurant in universities (which banned non-Muslims from getting in except with the company of a Muslim), and they even asked for their own toilets (for Muslim students only).

Alcohol and cigarettes are banned thoroughly in a small country named Shadian in Yunnan Province (there are infidels living there too).

And so on. Incidents like the above happen a lot in China nowadays. A distressing fact is that many local governments failed to use administrative power to stop those Muslims doing illegal stuff, probably because they are afraid of being accused of racism and “ethnicism” (they’re so blind to realise that Muslims are not a race or ethnicity).

In China’s history, whenever those radicals gained enough power, they started purges against infidels. From what I recall, there’ve been two significant purges in the history (I’m just glad that gun control is pretty strict in China now). Some Muslims in China call themselves “moderate”, but they have never condemned those massacres; some of them have even denied and helped covered the facts.

A great portion of Muslims in China are stepping away from secularisation. Muslims in China hold on to their own cultures and beliefs and principles very tightly, but now the thing is, many of them tend to isolate themselves from the rest of the society, and there’s no interaction of any sorts between them and other communities, and they’re reluctant to let in any part of Chinese cultures. The worse thing is some Muslims are trying to amplify their circle to other communities and force their principle to those communities. What a terrible move.

Personally, I’m not confident that I would ever live to see any changes of the situation.

I’ll end the post with a joke I heard recently: “Islam is a religion of peace. A piece here and a piece there.”

 
Twissel
 
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Twissel
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18 May 2017 01:33
 

Thanks for the report.

Yes, China has been exporting Muslim terrorism in the hope that it wouldn’t strike at home - an obviously short-sighted policy.

 
 
CX_Huang
 
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CX_Huang
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18 May 2017 01:44
 
Twissel - 18 May 2017 01:33 AM

Thanks for the report.

Yes, China has been exporting Muslim terrorism in the hope that it wouldn’t strike at home - an obviously short-sighted policy.

I’m not sure if exporting Muslim terrorism is a policy, but it’s true that many Chinese Muslims are willing to devote themselves to Jihad if given the chance.

 
Twissel
 
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Twissel
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18 May 2017 04:13
 
CX_Huang - 18 May 2017 01:44 AM
Twissel - 18 May 2017 01:33 AM

Thanks for the report.

Yes, China has been exporting Muslim terrorism in the hope that it wouldn’t strike at home - an obviously short-sighted policy.

I’m not sure if exporting Muslim terrorism is a policy, but it’s true that many Chinese Muslims are willing to devote themselves to Jihad if given the chance.

oh yes, just like Russia, China doesn’t make it hard for Jihadists to leave the country to fight in Iraq/Syria etc. ISIS has a significant number of Uighur fighters.

The hope is that they will get killed or can be intercepted on the way back - which is foolish, of course: what you get back are battle-hardened veterans.

 

 
 
Celal
 
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18 May 2017 08:31
 
CX_Huang - 17 May 2017 07:38 PM

A supermarket was surrounded by Muslims. They threatened and forced the supermarket to withdraw all products related to pork.

A restaurant run by a non-Muslim owner was trashed to a mess and the owner was beaten pretty badly, because the restaurant provided pork in the noodles.

Akhond in a small country called Dongxiang confiscated all the televisions from locals because certain TV programs violated Sharia Law.

Many Muslim students asked for their own restaurant in universities (which banned non-Muslims from getting in except with the company of a Muslim), and they even asked for their own toilets (for Muslim students only).

Alcohol and cigarettes are banned thoroughly in a small country named Shadian in Yunnan Province (there are infidels living there too).

And so on. Incidents like the above happen a lot in China nowadays. A distressing fact is that many local governments failed to use administrative power to stop those Muslims doing illegal stuff, probably because they are afraid of being accused of racism and “ethnicism” (they’re so blind to realise that Muslims are not a race or ethnicity).

In China’s history, whenever those radicals gained enough power, they started purges against infidels. From what I recall, there’ve been two significant purges in the history (I’m just glad that gun control is pretty strict in China now). Some Muslims in China call themselves “moderate”, but they have never condemned those massacres; some of them have even denied and helped covered the facts.

A great portion of Muslims in China are stepping away from secularisation. Muslims in China hold on to their own cultures and beliefs and principles very tightly, but now the thing is, many of them tend to isolate themselves from the rest of the society, and there’s no interaction of any sorts between them and other communities, and they’re reluctant to let in any part of Chinese cultures. The worse thing is some Muslims are trying to amplify their circle to other communities and force their principle to those communities. What a terrible move.

Personally, I’m not confident that I would ever live to see any changes of the situation.

I’ll end the post with a joke I heard recently: “Islam is a religion of peace. A piece here and a piece there.”

CX_Huang, thanks for the post. I have had a strange curiosity about the Muslims living in China.  You may already know Turks who migrated to present day Anatolia FROM central Asia for historical reasons feel a certain kinship with Uyghurs living in China.  Because of Chinese and Uyghur conflicts, Turks have been known to protest against the Chinese in cities like Istanbul and even verbally attacked an Asian tour group visiting Turkey.  It made the headlines when the Asians tour guide complained ..... “We are not Chinese, we are Koreans!”

You are right to point out Muslims will not condemn other Muslims in conflicts with non-Muslims except when only after declaring perpetrators are not true Muslims.

 
CX_Huang
 
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CX_Huang
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20 May 2017 07:51
 

There is a government department called National Bureau of Religious Affairs which is a living evidence that Muslims are infiltrating into administrative level in China, it has local offices in every province. The bureau is now like an umbrella sheltering Muslims nationwide - if an infidel and a Muslim have a collision, the infidel would be the one that get punished for “jeopardising interethnic solidarity”, and the Muslim involved in most cases walk out free. (FYI, Muslims are mistakenly considered as an ethnic minority group by many people in China! Huge mistakes!)

Shadian, the small country I mentioned in the previous post, its local government has been taken over by the local Bureau of Religious Affairs who favours only the interest of Muslims. One quick example: Shadian is one of the poorest country in China, but local government somehow managed to gather enough fund to build a gigantic, prestigious mosque instead of using that money to create better life for the poor. One of my journalist friend went there intending to get information, but he was forbidden to take any pictures of that mosque, and was threaten to keep his mouth shut. Looks like certain people in that country don’t want the outside to know what’s really going on there.

Chinese government is having a lot of contracts with Middle Eastern countries, it might be the reason that our government chose to be blind to all those problems.

 
CX_Huang
 
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CX_Huang
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20 May 2017 07:52
 
Celal - 18 May 2017 08:31 AM
CX_Huang - 17 May 2017 07:38 PM

A supermarket was surrounded by Muslims. They threatened and forced the supermarket to withdraw all products related to pork.

A restaurant run by a non-Muslim owner was trashed to a mess and the owner was beaten pretty badly, because the restaurant provided pork in the noodles.

Akhond in a small country called Dongxiang confiscated all the televisions from locals because certain TV programs violated Sharia Law.

Many Muslim students asked for their own restaurant in universities (which banned non-Muslims from getting in except with the company of a Muslim), and they even asked for their own toilets (for Muslim students only).

Alcohol and cigarettes are banned thoroughly in a small country named Shadian in Yunnan Province (there are infidels living there too).

And so on. Incidents like the above happen a lot in China nowadays. A distressing fact is that many local governments failed to use administrative power to stop those Muslims doing illegal stuff, probably because they are afraid of being accused of racism and “ethnicism” (they’re so blind to realise that Muslims are not a race or ethnicity).

In China’s history, whenever those radicals gained enough power, they started purges against infidels. From what I recall, there’ve been two significant purges in the history (I’m just glad that gun control is pretty strict in China now). Some Muslims in China call themselves “moderate”, but they have never condemned those massacres; some of them have even denied and helped covered the facts.

A great portion of Muslims in China are stepping away from secularisation. Muslims in China hold on to their own cultures and beliefs and principles very tightly, but now the thing is, many of them tend to isolate themselves from the rest of the society, and there’s no interaction of any sorts between them and other communities, and they’re reluctant to let in any part of Chinese cultures. The worse thing is some Muslims are trying to amplify their circle to other communities and force their principle to those communities. What a terrible move.

Personally, I’m not confident that I would ever live to see any changes of the situation.

I’ll end the post with a joke I heard recently: “Islam is a religion of peace. A piece here and a piece there.”

CX_Huang, thanks for the post. I have had a strange curiosity about the Muslims living in China.  You may already know Turks who migrated to present day Anatolia FROM central Asia for historical reasons feel a certain kinship with Uyghurs living in China.  Because of Chinese and Uyghur conflicts, Turks have been known to protest against the Chinese in cities like Istanbul and even verbally attacked an Asian tour group visiting Turkey.  It made the headlines when the Asians tour guide complained ..... “We are not Chinese, we are Koreans!”

You are right to point out Muslims will not condemn other Muslims in conflicts with non-Muslims except when only after declaring perpetrators are not true Muslims.

There is a government department called National Bureau of Religious Affairs which is a living evidence that Muslims are infiltrating into administrative level in China, it has local offices in every province. The bureau is now like an umbrella sheltering Muslims nationwide - if an infidel and a Muslim have a collision, the infidel would be the one that get punished for “jeopardising interethnic solidarity”, and the Muslim involved in most cases walk out free. (FYI, Muslims are mistakenly considered as an ethnic minority group by many people in China! Huge mistakes!)
Shadian, the small country I mentioned in the previous post, its local government has been taken over by the local Bureau of Religious Affairs who favours only the interest of Muslims. One quick example: Shadian is one of the poorest country in China, but local government somehow managed to gather enough fund to build a gigantic, prestigious mosque instead of using that money to create better life for the poor. One of my journalist friend went there intending to get information, but he was forbidden to take any pictures of that mosque, and was threaten to keep his mouth shut. Looks like certain people in that country don’t want the outside to know what’s really going on there.
Chinese government is having a lot of contracts with Middle Eastern countries, it might be the reason that our government chose to be blind to all those problems.

 
Celal
 
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20 May 2017 10:53
 
CX_Huang - 20 May 2017 07:52 AM

One quick example: Shadian is one of the poorest country in China, but local government somehow managed to gather enough fund to build a gigantic, prestigious mosque instead of using that money to create better life for the poor. One of my journalist friend went there intending to get information, but he was forbidden to take any pictures of that mosque, and was threaten to keep his mouth shut. Looks like certain people in that country don’t want the outside to know what’s really going on there.
Chinese government is having a lot of contracts with Middle Eastern countries, it might be the reason that our government chose to be blind to all those problems.

Had no idea about the extent to which the influence is spread. Though not shocked.  The poorest district you call has one of the largest Mosques in South East Asia,  no doubt was built with monies coming from Middle East, determined to spread Islam at all costs. The same mentality that moved the Saudi King to offer to build 200 Mosques in Europe to help fight Islamic terrorism.

I’m just very surprised that Chinese Government is letting it all happen. Looks like the cultural revolution led to revival of Islam in China.

 

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CX_Huang
 
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CX_Huang
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20 May 2017 17:52
 
Celal - 20 May 2017 10:53 AM
CX_Huang - 20 May 2017 07:52 AM

One quick example: Shadian is one of the poorest country in China, but local government somehow managed to gather enough fund to build a gigantic, prestigious mosque instead of using that money to create better life for the poor. One of my journalist friend went there intending to get information, but he was forbidden to take any pictures of that mosque, and was threaten to keep his mouth shut. Looks like certain people in that country don’t want the outside to know what’s really going on there.
Chinese government is having a lot of contracts with Middle Eastern countries, it might be the reason that our government chose to be blind to all those problems.

Had no idea about the extent to which the influence is spread. Though not shocked.  The poorest district you call has one of the largest Mosques in South East Asia,  no doubt was built with monies coming from Middle East, determined to spread Islam at all costs. The same mentality that moved the Saudi King to offer to build 200 Mosques in Europe to help fight Islamic terrorism.

I’m just very surprised that Chinese Government is letting it all happen. Looks like the cultural revolution led to revival of Islam in China.

 

Thanks for the photo. It really helps understand what’s going on there.

Chinese government has done something even more stupid and ridiculous in the past. Once there was a policy called “Liang Shao Yi Kuan” (????), it was a policy that minimise penalties against criminals of ethnic minority groups. (Muslims were, and still are, mistakenly considered as an ethnic minority group) The policy was abolished but its impacts are still around.

 
CX_Huang
 
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CX_Huang
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20 May 2017 18:05
 

Not long ago, residents of a micro-district called Hangkong Xincheng in Hefei, Anhui Province, gathered together to protest against the construction of a mosque,  but they soon received warning accusing them of “jeopardising interethnic harmony”. Authorities even called them to keep quiet.

The number of incidents like this is still climbing. There would be an earthquake when it reaches the breaking point.

 
Celal
 
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20 May 2017 20:58
 

Your posts piqued my interest and I check around .. this article explained a lot of the concerns you expressed in detail.

http://chinascope.org/archives/4241/148

This link above really changed my view of China. I had thought they had a tighter control over their minorities.  I was wrong. The policy you mentioned “liang shao yi kuan,”  essentially led to “less arrests, and less sentencing.”  In general, when dealing with (ethnic minorities), under the guise of being tolerant. Of course many Han Chinese perceive this policy encouraging criminal activities such as robbery, rape and manslaughter. This is not treating everyone equal. It is reverse discrimination. 

In any event, this article once again tells the same old story that Muslims don’t play nice with their neighbours. Not in Asia, Not in Middle East, Not in Europe. Not even among themselves.

Thanks.

 
ragnarkar
 
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ragnarkar
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30 April 2021 15:31
 

I feel like Sam has been avoiding this topic.  I don’t blame him - maybe he doesn’t know very much about it or maybe he’s purposely avoiding it so not to get blacklisted by the Chinese audience.  In any case, this video provides more insight into their plight as of 2021:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alMhCPjsxlE

Unfortunately, it’s very difficult to get a good sense of what’s going on in Xinjiang since it’s extremely difficult to get journalists from outside of China to go there to accurately report on what’s happening without the journalists getting denied entry, arrested, having their stuff confiscated,etc.