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Old Testament Theme Parks, Movies, Museums - a Christian Thing?

 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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11 December 2017 12:05
 
MARTIN_UK - 10 December 2017 12:22 PM

Similar myths appear all over the world in different cultures and religions, many have the same theme. History is something different.

We have a legend near us that has a distinct ring to it called the “Lampton Worm”, we even learned the accompanying song at school when we were kids, sung in local accents. And of course it is completely factual…

Thoreau writes in his Journal, March 5, 1860:  “The old naturalists were so sensitive and sympathetic to nature that they could be surprised by ordinary events of life.  It was an incessant miracle to them, and therefore gorgons and flying dragons were not incredible to them.  The greatest and saddest defect is not credulity, but our habitual forgetfulness that our science is ignorance.”

http://dinosaurpictures.org/Pterodactyl-pictures

 

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jdrnd
 
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31 December 2017 08:54
 
unsmoked - 06 December 2017 09:32 AM

Do Jewish families go to visit the Noah’s Ark theme park in Kentucky?  https://arkencounter.com/about-the-ark/ 

Do Israelis go to see Hollywood productions about Moses and the Decalogue, or the flight from Egypt with the parting of the Red Sea?

In Israel, are there Old Testament theme parks like the Garden of Eden, with actors, lush vegetation, and a snake?  Do Israeli artists make statues of Lot’s wife carved from salt?

Do us “scientific families” go to science themed parks and museums?

 
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31 December 2017 08:58
 
unsmoked - 11 December 2017 12:05 PM

...The greatest and saddest defect is not credulity, but our habitual forgetfulness that our science is ignorance.”

Perhaps Thoreau didn’t understand that Science is a series of methods, not a body of knowledge.


...or perhaps I don’t understand Thoreau.

 
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unsmoked
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31 December 2017 11:06
 
jdrnd - 31 December 2017 08:58 AM
unsmoked - 11 December 2017 12:05 PM

...The greatest and saddest defect is not credulity, but our habitual forgetfulness that our science is ignorance.”

Perhaps Thoreau didn’t understand that Science is a series of methods, not a body of knowledge.


...or perhaps I don’t understand Thoreau.

https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/thoreau/

quote from this article:

“Thoreau sometimes characterizes science as an ideal discipline that will enrich our knowledge and experience: “The true man of science will know nature better by his finer organization; he will smell, taste, see, hear, feel, better than other men. His will be a deeper and finer experience” (“Natural History of Massachusetts”). He observes that scientific terminology can provide the means of apprehending something that we had utterly missed until we had a name for it (see Walls 2012, 108). Yet he also gives voice to the fear that by weighing and measuring things and collecting quantitative data he may actually be narrowing his vision. The scientist “studies nature as a dead language,” and would rather study a dead fish preserved in a jar than a living one in its native element (Journal, 5/10/53 & 11/30/58). In these same journal entries, Thoreau claims that he seeks to experience the significance of nature, and that “the beauty of the fish” is what is most worthy of being measured. On the other hand, when he finds a dead fish in the water, he brings it home to weigh and measure, covering several pages with his statistical findings (Journal, 8/20/54). This is only one of many examples of Thoreau’s fascination with data-gathering, and yet he repeatedly questions its value, as if he does not know what to make of his own penchant for naturalistic research. At the very least, scientific investigations run the risk of being “trivial and petty,” so perhaps what one should do is “learn science and then forget it” (Journal, 1/21/53 & 4/22/52). But Thoreau is more deeply troubled by the possibility that “science is inhuman,” since objects “seen with a microscope begin to be insignificant,” and this is “not the means of acquiring true knowledge” (Journal, 5/1/59 & 5/28/54). Overall, his position is not that a mystical or imaginative awareness of the world is incompatible with knowledge of measurable facts, but that an exclusive focus on the latter would blind us to whatever aspects of reality fall outside the scope of our measurement.”  (end quote)

I wonder if it was in Walden that Thoreau wrote about the ‘lively’ observations of the Greek philosopher/naturalists -  something like ‘the cool waters of the Euphrates where the animals delighted to drink.’  (paraphrase from memory).  He couldn’t find observations like that in 1850’s zoology texts.  Now, I think, he’d enjoy National Geographic programs, Cousteau, Attenborough and many others.  Loren Eiseley?  https://www.amazon.com/Immense-Journey-Imaginative-Naturalist-Mysteries/dp/0394701577

5.0 out of 5 stars
By tim on October 23, 2014

“Eiseley has a distinct style of prose in which he inserts anthropology, paleontology, sociology in a web that weaves the story of man rather well. Distinctly not a scientific treatise but a wonderful journey, it should be mandatory reading in high school english, history or other subjects.”

[ Edited: 31 December 2017 11:12 by unsmoked]
 
 
Brick Bungalow
 
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Brick Bungalow
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23 January 2018 17:49
 
unsmoked - 06 December 2017 09:32 AM

Do Jewish families go to visit the Noah’s Ark theme park in Kentucky?  https://arkencounter.com/about-the-ark/ 

Do Israelis go to see Hollywood productions about Moses and the Decalogue, or the flight from Egypt with the parting of the Red Sea?

In Israel, are there Old Testament theme parks like the Garden of Eden, with actors, lush vegetation, and a snake?  Do Israeli artists make statues of Lot’s wife carved from salt?

If the answer is ‘no’, is it because, in general, Jews don’t confuse history with mythology?  Are there fundamentalist regions in Israel where science teachers in public schools are expected to teach the Genesis story of humanity’s origin?

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/17/us/politics/bible-museum-hobby-lobby-washington.html

I’m not sure. Israel has a pretty ambitious tourist trade. Judaism is pretty unapologetic in its capitalism. Attend a high holiday with all the proper accoutrements and let me know what the bill is. Mecca during pilgrimage. The Vatican city during Easter. All of this is merchandised and cross promoted to the hilt. There may not be an actual theme park but it feels pretty similar. As far as literal belief Jews probably do have a smaller proportion of literal or orthodox believers but they certain exist. They steer policy. They determine the flow of capital. From my vantage these things are more similar than they are different.

 
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24 January 2018 11:37
 
Brick Bungalow - 23 January 2018 05:49 PM
unsmoked - 06 December 2017 09:32 AM

Do Jewish families go to visit the Noah’s Ark theme park in Kentucky?  https://arkencounter.com/about-the-ark/ 

Do Israelis go to see Hollywood productions about Moses and the Decalogue, or the flight from Egypt with the parting of the Red Sea?

In Israel, are there Old Testament theme parks like the Garden of Eden, with actors, lush vegetation, and a snake?  Do Israeli artists make statues of Lot’s wife carved from salt?

If the answer is ‘no’, is it because, in general, Jews don’t confuse history with mythology?  Are there fundamentalist regions in Israel where science teachers in public schools are expected to teach the Genesis story of humanity’s origin?

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/17/us/politics/bible-museum-hobby-lobby-washington.html

I’m not sure. Israel has a pretty ambitious tourist trade. Judaism is pretty unapologetic in its capitalism. Attend a high holiday with all the proper accoutrements and let me know what the bill is. Mecca during pilgrimage. The Vatican city during Easter. All of this is merchandised and cross promoted to the hilt. There may not be an actual theme park but it feels pretty similar. As far as literal belief Jews probably do have a smaller proportion of literal or orthodox believers but they certain exist. They steer policy. They determine the flow of capital. From my vantage these things are more similar than they are different.

“They steer policy.  They determine the flow of capital.” 

Speaking of the Bible tourist trade, there’s an article in the April 2016 Smithsonian Magazine about ‘EVOTOURISM 2016 -  ‘Welcome to Monkey Town’.  https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/dayton-tennessee-evolved-scopes-trial-180958497/

quote from this article:

“A 2014 Gallup poll showed that 42 percent of Americans reject evolution. The figure hasn’t changed much over the three decades in which the survey has been conducted. Perhaps more surprising: In 2007, Penn State researchers canvassed 939 high-school biology teachers across the country and found that 16 percent said they personally believed God created human beings in the last 10,000 years.”  (end quote)

If Trump is still in office in 2020, I wonder if this 42% of Americans who reject evolution are enough by themselves to vote him in again?  That must be well over 100 million people.  Should the topic title be changed to ‘Old Testament Theme Parks, Movies, Museums, Elections’  ?

Another question:  Does this 42% of Americans who reject evolution explain those who say that humans are not causing climate change?  Over 100 million Americans reject science that is 4th grade knowledge in other parts of the world?

 

[ Edited: 24 January 2018 11:49 by unsmoked]
 
 
Brick Bungalow
 
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31 January 2018 18:20
 

I think it was a reference in a Larry David bit:  ‘Conde’ Nast declares Jerusalem to be a Mecca for tourists’.

 
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