‘A pledge of allegiance to the oil and gas industry’

 
unsmoked
 
Avatar
 
 
unsmoked
Total Posts:  7455
Joined  20-02-2006
 
 
 
10 January 2018 11:41
 

‘A pledge of allegiance to the oil and gas industry’  Does this explain the Republican denial of human-caused global warming? 

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/01/01/the-dark-bounty-of-texas-oil

quote from this article:

“Most of Texas’s political leaders are complacent about climate change, and publicly express doubt that it is happening—or, at least, that human activity has anything to do with it. Given the scientific consensus on global warming, it is difficult to read this political resistance as anything other than a pledge of allegiance to the oil-and-gas industry, which is headquartered right in the hurricane strike zone.”  (end quote)

Denial of scientific consensus because it conflicts with religious beliefs?  http://climatecommunication.yale.edu/publications/global-warming-god-end-times/

 
 
mapadofu
 
Avatar
 
 
mapadofu
Total Posts:  218
Joined  20-07-2017
 
 
 
10 January 2018 13:48
 

This might not be so prevalent in pols, and probably not even all that common altogether in religious people, but I’ve encountered more than a few people who hold an idea along the lines of “humans are incapable of making significant, global, changes [to the environment]”, and I believe that it may be related to an idea that, in the end, the fate of of the world is in the almighty’s hands, and thus puny humans couldn’t be the key agent in affecting something as big as the climate.  In another discussion elsewhere, someone (who I believe is strongly religious) claimed that volcanoes have a larger environmental impact than humans.  That person still clung to that idea when I pointed him to US Forest Service data on how much clear-cutting is going on the in the US, and that it (on a yearly basis) is larger than the area affected by the eruption of Mt. Saint Helens (using “forest area cut down” as a relevant environmental impact of volcanoes).

There are several sections of this talk, “Science works ... Science helps us” by Dr. R. Alley that I’ve found interesting and relevant to consider on this kind of thing.
https://youtu.be/5zko-8txYpw

I’m really uncertain as to how many (or which) politicians know the truth, but deny it for monetary/political gains (Newt is one potential person in my estimation), and which are just sincerely wrong.

 
unsmoked
 
Avatar
 
 
unsmoked
Total Posts:  7455
Joined  20-02-2006
 
 
 
11 January 2018 10:49
 
mapadofu - 10 January 2018 01:48 PM

This might not be so prevalent in pols, and probably not even all that common altogether in religious people, but I’ve encountered more than a few people who hold an idea along the lines of “humans are incapable of making significant, global, changes [to the environment]”, and I believe that it may be related to an idea that, in the end, the fate of of the world is in the almighty’s hands, and thus puny humans couldn’t be the key agent in affecting something as big as the climate.  In another discussion elsewhere, someone (who I believe is strongly religious) claimed that volcanoes have a larger environmental impact than humans.  That person still clung to that idea when I pointed him to US Forest Service data on how much clear-cutting is going on the in the US, and that it (on a yearly basis) is larger than the area affected by the eruption of Mt. Saint Helens (using “forest area cut down” as a relevant environmental impact of volcanoes).

There are several sections of this talk, “Science works ... Science helps us” by Dr. R. Alley that I’ve found interesting and relevant to consider on this kind of thing.
https://youtu.be/5zko-8txYpw

I’m really uncertain as to how many (or which) politicians know the truth, but deny it for monetary/political gains (Newt is one potential person in my estimation), and which are just sincerely wrong.

Your comment here that some religious people believe that “humans are incapable of making significant global changes to the environment” -  may be why Sam Harris thought that many Christians would see a nuclear war as an act of God, designed to usher in the end days.  In his ‘LETTER TO A CHRISTIAN NATION’ he writes: “It is, therefore, not an exaggeration to say that if the city of New York were suddenly replaced by a ball of fire, some significant percentage of the American population would see a silver lining in the subsequent mushroom cloud, as it would suggest to them that the best thing that is ever going to happen was about to happen”  the return of Christ.”