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Lament for a mouse

 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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30 March 2018 11:35
 

Late last night a mouse died in my kitchen.  Killed in a traditional mouse trap.  I heard the trap spring and I then saw its tail move briefly before it succumbed.  I thought it was supposed to be instantaneous.  Mr. CAN was immediately awoken to confirm that suffering had ceased and to dispose of the body.

We live in an older house, and every few years or so mice get in.  We’ve done checks of the house and plugged any holes that can be found, to no avail.  (In the past, we had cats that dealt with the problem.  Even then, I was sometimes able to rescue live mice from feline jaws and release outside.)  A couple of years ago when we had mice, I bought live traps which worked well in catching but not in solving the problem.  We released them in a park not far from our house, but we’re fairly sure mice were being caught more than once.  We had a pest control service, which specializes in live trapping, come to the house to see if they could help determine where they were getting in.  Although they live trap other animals, he indicated it doesn’t work that well for mice or rats.  So out came the death traps.

I’m not a vegetarian, although I tried it for a while some years ago.  I don’t like that type of diet and am married to a ‘meat-and-potatoes’ guy, so didn’t do it correctly.  After several months and starting not to feel well, I gave it up.  I don’t eat veal (cruelty concerns) and buy eggs from happy chickens (free range).  I would gladly pay more for meat if there were suppliers that guaranteed the most humane treatment of animals.

I am also judgemental of those who like to hunt, who get enjoyment from killing an animal.  I don’t understand how someone can look at a deer and want to shoot it.  However, I realize this is hypocritical as I eat meat and have no right to feel superior by letting others do the killing for the meat I eat.  Also, an animal living in the wild and killed instantly by a responsible hunter has led a better life and suffered a quicker end than a farm animal, most likely.

So, there is a moral conflict in regards to empathy for all living things (except spiders) and the realistic view that humans are omnivores rather than herbivores, and that in the natural world some animals must die for the benefit of others.

But I still feel a little guilty about that mouse.

I was wondering if others here ever feel conflicted in regards to the treatment of animals and how you deal with it.

 
 
LadyJane
 
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LadyJane
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30 March 2018 17:15
 

I overcame my aversion to mice when I had to feed them to orphaned hawks.

Wanna borrow The Trotsky?  Ha ha!  It’s hard to build a better mousetrap… 

Oh Snap!

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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30 March 2018 17:50
 
LadyJane - 30 March 2018 05:15 PM

I overcame my aversion to mice when I had to feed them to orphaned hawks.

Wanna borrow The Trotsky?  Ha ha!  It’s hard to build a better mousetrap… 

Oh Snap!

Haha ... I’d love to borrow The Trotsky!  I really do miss having cats; I don’t have any now because we’ve had such bad luck with their health problems (diabetes, epilepsy) and don’t want any more heartbreak.  At least for now; I still have the cat paraphernalia stored in the basement in case I change my mind or a stray shows up at the door.

I don’t have an aversion to mice exactly; I actually think they’re kinda cute.  But I definitely don’t want them living in my house.

I can only guess how you’d get a hold of mice to feed to hawks, and whether or not these have to be fed live to the hawks.  If you find more hawks, you can have my mice.  Were you able to save these orphaned hawks?

 

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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30 March 2018 20:15
 

My brother was a big bird hunter.  I didn’t have the gene.  I went hunting with him several times.  I shot a dove and before I twisted it’s head off it cooed.  That was the last dove I shot.  I shot a squirrel in a tree and felt sorry for it.  I didn’t have the hunting gene. I have no objection to hunting - I just never took to it.  To me it’s just a matter of preference - not a moral issue.  I’ve castrated pigs and slaughtered chickens, but I decided to become a lawyer, not a hunter, farmer or rancher. Just not my thing.  Takes all kinds, I guess.

 
LadyJane
 
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31 March 2018 06:13
 

I don’t wanna overstate this, but, animals are the greatest thing ever in the history of everything.

Fortunately, I’ve had the privilege of learning from some incredibly skilled veterinarians and spent countless hours treating domestic and wild animals over the years.  Time in Guelph.  Time in Clinics.  Time in the Forest.  The injured and orphaned wild ones usually thrive as long as they are released precisely where they were found.  The hawks and kestrels and ravens and crows can be challenging to handle but feeding the smaller bird varieties is far less eventful than Tippi Hedren would have us believe.  The raccoons and squirrels are far more sociable making it tempting to keep them…until, that is, they remind you of their nature…and leave you with the scars to prove it.  Venturing farther north, towards the cottage, finds a varied array of species including the beavers and otters that seem to have inhabited our shore.  Much to my delight.  And politically mindful bears, of course.  It can be extremely hard work caring for animals, at the best of times, and when pets have chronic diseases it can be emotionally exhausting and costly as hell.  With empathy running in overdrive.  And yet totally worth it somehow.  Like pulling porcupine quills from the same dogs over and over coz they lack the self awareness to know enough to stay away.  Hundreds and hundreds of quills.  And, I have to admit, there is nothing quite as exhilarating as delicately pulling ticks out of a skunk.  It gives you time to think.  And put things in perspective.

It makes you wonder what they might say if ever they got the chance…

 
 
SkepticX
 
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31 March 2018 07:09
 
EN - 30 March 2018 08:15 PM

My brother was a big bird hunter.  I didn’t have the gene.  I went hunting with him several times.  I shot a dove and before I twisted it’s head off it cooed.  That was the last dove I shot.  I shot a squirrel in a tree and felt sorry for it.  I didn’t have the hunting gene. I have no objection to hunting - I just never took to it.  To me it’s just a matter of preference - not a moral issue.  I’ve castrated pigs and slaughtered chickens, but I decided to become a lawyer, not a hunter, farmer or rancher. Just not my thing.  Takes all kinds, I guess.


I’m pretty much the same about hunting—haven’t done it myself other than a couple of squirrel hunting excursions when I was in high school though, and I’ve shot a few possums and at least one raccoon that we caught in the hen houses (I really hate shooting possums because they’re so damn tough—it’s hard to hit their tiny brain, and that makes it pretty sketchy in terms of making it quick and humane). I’d hunt in order to cull the herds if needed, but I know I wouldn’t enjoy it at all. I’d also do it for some good, fresh meat, or certainly if it were a subsistence thing.

My dad took me to watch a cow slaughtered by a local rancher when I was probably 12 or 13. We were getting a quarter side of beef. Grocery shopping, old school.  Cows are pretty freakin’ huge up close. I can remember thinking it would take some impressive violence to kill such a beast—made me a bit nervous/more alert. It was done humanely—incredibly quick. One tiny .22 round shot through the brain, point blank. Instant. The cow just dropped, immediately. It hit the ground before the echoes of the report died out in the trees. That gave me a strong sense of how fragile we and pretty much all individual animal life really is. My family enjoyed that meat for a good while too—beef that fresh is really good.

Most dudes go through a killer stage when we’re young. During that stage we’re very cat-like in our fascination with killing small animals and seeing how they can function with limbs missing and what a firecracker will do to them and all sorts of horrible, cruel and vicious things like that (usually no victims with too close of an analog for a human face though). Many of us apparently never grow out of this killer stage. I was completely schizo in that stage. I think I had an inherent sense of guilt over it, so I’d engage in killer behaviors one day, and on another I’d protect some small critter from being victimized by friends and peers as if it were a kid being bullied. I think crazy is sometimes just a matter of observational timing.

I have no problem at all with outdoor enthusiasts who appreciate the nature of life and all that, but I do have a visceral problem with the killing enthusiasts—the ones who spot a coyote in the distance and shoot it just for the thrill of a good kill shot and the joy of making something die, and the bragging rights. I stop short of judging those who do that sort of thing “in the wild” (or at least I try), but it’s hard to overcome some slight revulsion, particularly to the bragging, and for those who are very casual to my mind about killing non-food animals in their charge when they become inconvenient. It’s as if some natural inhibition against violating trust is broken in order to allow for that behavior. But I don’t know if any such inhibition is actually natural (or even universally socialized in my own culture regarding pets). So I try to remember it’s just my own life experience talking, at least to some extent, and I just did a really good job choosing my family.

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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31 March 2018 07:29
 
SkepticX - 31 March 2018 07:09 AM
EN - 30 March 2018 08:15 PM

My brother was a big bird hunter.  I didn’t have the gene.  I went hunting with him several times.  I shot a dove and before I twisted it’s head off it cooed.  That was the last dove I shot.  I shot a squirrel in a tree and felt sorry for it.  I didn’t have the hunting gene. I have no objection to hunting - I just never took to it.  To me it’s just a matter of preference - not a moral issue.  I’ve castrated pigs and slaughtered chickens, but I decided to become a lawyer, not a hunter, farmer or rancher. Just not my thing.  Takes all kinds, I guess.


I’m pretty much the same about hunting—haven’t done it myself other than a couple of squirrel hunting excursions when I was in high school though, and I’ve shot a few possums and at least one raccoon that we caught in the hen houses (I really hate shooting possums because they’re so damn tough—it’s hard to hit their tiny brain, and that makes it pretty sketchy in terms of making it quick and humane). I’d hunt in order to cull the herds if needed, but I know I wouldn’t enjoy it at all. I’d also do it for some good, fresh meat, or certainly if it were a subsistence thing.

My dad took me to watch a cow slaughtered by a local rancher when I was probably 12 or 13. We were getting a quarter side of beef. Grocery shopping, old school.  Cows are pretty freakin’ huge up close. I can remember thinking it would take some impressive violence to kill such a beast—made me a bit nervous/more alert. It was done humanely—incredibly quick. One tiny .22 round shot through the brain, point blank. Instant. The cow just dropped, immediately. It hit the ground before the echoes of the report died out in the trees. That gave me a strong sense of how fragile we and pretty much all individual animal life really is. My family enjoyed that meat for a good while too—beef that fresh is really good.

Most dudes go through a killer stage when we’re young. During that stage we’re very cat-like in our fascination with killing small animals and seeing how they can function with limbs missing and what a firecracker will do to them and all sorts of horrible, cruel and vicious things like that (usually no victims with too close of an analog for a human face though). Many of us apparently never grow out of this killer stage. I was completely schizo in that stage. I think I had an inherent sense of guilt over it, so I’d engage in killer behaviors one day, and on another I’d protect some small critter from being victimized by friends and peers as if it were a kid being bullied. I think crazy is sometimes just a matter of observational timing.

I have no problem at all with outdoor enthusiasts who appreciate the nature of life and all that, but I do have a visceral problem with the killing enthusiasts—the ones who spot a coyote in the distance and shoot it just for the thrill of a good kill shot and the joy of making something die, and the bragging rights. I stop short of judging those who do that sort of thing “in the wild” (or at least I try), but it’s hard to overcome some slight revulsion, particularly to the bragging, and for those who are very casual to my mind about killing non-food animals in their charge when they become inconvenient. It’s as if some natural inhibition against violating trust is broken in order to allow for that behavior. But I don’t know if any such inhibition is actually natural (or even universally socialized in my own culture regarding pets). So I try to remember it’s just my own life experience talking, at least to some extent, and I just did a really good job choosing my family.

I had some of the same experiences as a child - I cringe now when I think of my psycho tendencies then.  Fortunately, I never turned into a Dahmer.  It is a stage, and most of my friends went through it.  The male brain can go antisocial pretty quickly if not nudged the right way in adolescence.  As long as it ends up just with hunting or target practice it’s OK.  But a few end up with AR 15s in Las Vegas hotels.

 
Jan_CAN
 
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31 March 2018 08:38
 
EN - 30 March 2018 08:15 PM

My brother was a big bird hunter.  I didn’t have the gene.  I went hunting with him several times.  I shot a dove and before I twisted it’s head off it cooed.  That was the last dove I shot.  I shot a squirrel in a tree and felt sorry for it.  I didn’t have the hunting gene. I have no objection to hunting - I just never took to it.  To me it’s just a matter of preference - not a moral issue.  I’ve castrated pigs and slaughtered chickens, but I decided to become a lawyer, not a hunter, farmer or rancher. Just not my thing.  Takes all kinds, I guess.

Yes, it takes all kinds.  Like many things, I think our early upbringing affects our views and feelings about animals.  If brought up on a farm or in a hunting family, one may have a different perspective than city folk.  (I was raised in an environment in between these, in a small city closely surrounded by natural life and beauty.)  And our own natures come into play too.

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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31 March 2018 08:40
 
LadyJane - 31 March 2018 06:13 AM

I don’t wanna overstate this, but, animals are the greatest thing ever in the history of everything.

Fortunately, I’ve had the privilege of learning from some incredibly skilled veterinarians and spent countless hours treating domestic and wild animals over the years.  Time in Guelph.  Time in Clinics.  Time in the Forest.  The injured and orphaned wild ones usually thrive as long as they are released precisely where they were found.  The hawks and kestrels and ravens and crows can be challenging to handle but feeding the smaller bird varieties is far less eventful than Tippi Hedren would have us believe.  The raccoons and squirrels are far more sociable making it tempting to keep them…until, that is, they remind you of their nature…and leave you with the scars to prove it.  Venturing farther north, towards the cottage, finds a varied array of species including the beavers and otters that seem to have inhabited our shore.  Much to my delight.  And politically mindful bears, of course.  It can be extremely hard work caring for animals, at the best of times, and when pets have chronic diseases it can be emotionally exhausting and costly as hell.  With empathy running in overdrive.  And yet totally worth it somehow.  Like pulling porcupine quills from the same dogs over and over coz they lack the self awareness to know enough to stay away.  Hundreds and hundreds of quills.  And, I have to admit, there is nothing quite as exhilarating as delicately pulling ticks out of a skunk.  It gives you time to think.  And put things in perspective.

It makes you wonder what they might say if ever they got the chance…

I agree – “animals are the greatest thing ever in the history of everything”.  Well put!

Thank you for sharing this story of your work with animals.  I’ve always admired the people who run wildlife rehab sanctuaries and those who devote time and energy to treating and caring for our wild (and domestic) animal cousins.  There must be a great many skills required to handle the various species and types of injuries and illnesses.  (I’ve only mastered giving medications and injections to fairly cooperative and trusting little felines.)  It must be very rewarding work to nurse an animal back to health and then set it free.

Yes, it would be great to know what they’d say, but at least we can still communicate when ‘in tune’ with them; it can be quite a profound experience when this happens.

 

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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31 March 2018 08:42
 
EN - 31 March 2018 07:29 AM
SkepticX - 31 March 2018 07:09 AM
EN - 30 March 2018 08:15 PM

My brother was a big bird hunter.  I didn’t have the gene.  I went hunting with him several times.  I shot a dove and before I twisted it’s head off it cooed.  That was the last dove I shot.  I shot a squirrel in a tree and felt sorry for it.  I didn’t have the hunting gene. I have no objection to hunting - I just never took to it.  To me it’s just a matter of preference - not a moral issue.  I’ve castrated pigs and slaughtered chickens, but I decided to become a lawyer, not a hunter, farmer or rancher. Just not my thing.  Takes all kinds, I guess.


I’m pretty much the same about hunting—haven’t done it myself other than a couple of squirrel hunting excursions when I was in high school though, and I’ve shot a few possums and at least one raccoon that we caught in the hen houses (I really hate shooting possums because they’re so damn tough—it’s hard to hit their tiny brain, and that makes it pretty sketchy in terms of making it quick and humane). I’d hunt in order to cull the herds if needed, but I know I wouldn’t enjoy it at all. I’d also do it for some good, fresh meat, or certainly if it were a subsistence thing.

My dad took me to watch a cow slaughtered by a local rancher when I was probably 12 or 13. We were getting a quarter side of beef. Grocery shopping, old school.  Cows are pretty freakin’ huge up close. I can remember thinking it would take some impressive violence to kill such a beast—made me a bit nervous/more alert. It was done humanely—incredibly quick. One tiny .22 round shot through the brain, point blank. Instant. The cow just dropped, immediately. It hit the ground before the echoes of the report died out in the trees. That gave me a strong sense of how fragile we and pretty much all individual animal life really is. My family enjoyed that meat for a good while too—beef that fresh is really good.

Most dudes go through a killer stage when we’re young. During that stage we’re very cat-like in our fascination with killing small animals and seeing how they can function with limbs missing and what a firecracker will do to them and all sorts of horrible, cruel and vicious things like that (usually no victims with too close of an analog for a human face though). Many of us apparently never grow out of this killer stage. I was completely schizo in that stage. I think I had an inherent sense of guilt over it, so I’d engage in killer behaviors one day, and on another I’d protect some small critter from being victimized by friends and peers as if it were a kid being bullied. I think crazy is sometimes just a matter of observational timing.

I have no problem at all with outdoor enthusiasts who appreciate the nature of life and all that, but I do have a visceral problem with the killing enthusiasts—the ones who spot a coyote in the distance and shoot it just for the thrill of a good kill shot and the joy of making something die, and the bragging rights. I stop short of judging those who do that sort of thing “in the wild” (or at least I try), but it’s hard to overcome some slight revulsion, particularly to the bragging, and for those who are very casual to my mind about killing non-food animals in their charge when they become inconvenient. It’s as if some natural inhibition against violating trust is broken in order to allow for that behavior. But I don’t know if any such inhibition is actually natural (or even universally socialized in my own culture regarding pets). So I try to remember it’s just my own life experience talking, at least to some extent, and I just did a really good job choosing my family.

I had some of the same experiences as a child - I cringe now when I think of my psycho tendencies then.  Fortunately, I never turned into a Dahmer.  It is a stage, and most of my friends went through it.  The male brain can go antisocial pretty quickly if not nudged the right way in adolescence.  As long as it ends up just with hunting or target practice it’s OK.  But a few end up with AR 15s in Las Vegas hotels.

Yeah, what is it with the male brain?  My kind-hearted husband has described his squirrel hunting expeditions (no gun; with a slingshot or baseball bat) with groups of other boys, when he was about ten or so.  As these were ineffective weapons, they were unsuccessful hunts, of which he is now glad, I think.  But for those who are successful, perhaps it’s the guilt about the unnecessary kill that prevents the ‘normal’ male from becoming cruel and dangerous when they grow up.

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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31 March 2018 10:17
 

Males are more likely to be autistic, psychopathic, and violent.  It’s evolution.  We were the tribal bad boys, leaders of the pack.  Violence was necessary, and sometimes it went a bit overboard.  Again, most of us don’t end up like that, but we go through that stage.

To turn the tables, what is it about the female brain that likes the bad boy?  Don’t deny that it exists.

 
Jan_CAN
 
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31 March 2018 11:24
 
EN - 31 March 2018 10:17 AM

Males are more likely to be autistic, psychopathic, and violent.  It’s evolution.  We were the tribal bad boys, leaders of the pack.  Violence was necessary, and sometimes it went a bit overboard.  Again, most of us don’t end up like that, but we go through that stage.

To turn the tables, what is it about the female brain that likes the bad boy?  Don’t deny that it exists.

Hmm ... good question.  What makes a ‘bad boy’ so damn sexy?  (Sometimes)

(I’ll just answer in regards to the more common, mildly bad boy, not the thankfully-few cruel or aggressive/violent types.  And, of course, my answer will only be from one female brain’s POV.)

Just as, through evolution, males have inherited certain traits needed for hunting, etc., females have probably inherited traits that were attracted to strong and dominant males that could provide and protect them and their children.  Simultaneously, I imagine that males also needed these traits to attract the females.  So we males and females still have some leftover traits that are no longer needed, or at least not quite in the same way as our ancestors.

We women can now look after ourselves and our children.  (Although I think a father is still important because two good parents are usually better than one good parent.)  Men do still provide for their families, but competitiveness is directed at jobs and careers rather than wrestling mammoths.  And the bad boys that women are attracted to now may not be the strongest, but the ones that are a little different, a little exciting.  And if somewhere in the mix there is a certain amount of vulnerability, they can be downright irresistible.

 

 
 
EN
 
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31 March 2018 13:07
 
Jan_CAN - 31 March 2018 11:24 AM
EN - 31 March 2018 10:17 AM

Males are more likely to be autistic, psychopathic, and violent.  It’s evolution.  We were the tribal bad boys, leaders of the pack.  Violence was necessary, and sometimes it went a bit overboard.  Again, most of us don’t end up like that, but we go through that stage.

To turn the tables, what is it about the female brain that likes the bad boy?  Don’t deny that it exists.

Hmm ... good question.  What makes a ‘bad boy’ so damn sexy?  (Sometimes)

(I’ll just answer in regards to the more common, mildly bad boy, not the thankfully-few cruel or aggressive/violent types.  And, of course, my answer will only be from one female brain’s POV.)

Just as, through evolution, males have inherited certain traits needed for hunting, etc., females have probably inherited traits that were attracted to strong and dominant males that could provide and protect them and their children.  Simultaneously, I imagine that males also needed these traits to attract the females.  So we males and females still have some leftover traits that are no longer needed, or at least not quite in the same way as our ancestors.

We women can now look after ourselves and our children.  (Although I think a father is still important because two good parents are usually better than one good parent.)  Men do still provide for their families, but competitiveness is directed at jobs and careers rather than wrestling mammoths.  And the bad boys that women are attracted to now may not be the strongest, but the ones that are a little different, a little exciting.  And if somewhere in the mix there is a certain amount of vulnerability, they can be downright irresistible.

I think you nailed it.  You want a man, not a “mouse” (to get the thread back on track).

 
Jan_CAN
 
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31 March 2018 13:54
 
EN - 31 March 2018 01:07 PM

I think you nailed it.  You want a man, not a “mouse” (to get the thread back on track).

Haha ... more specifically, this particularly squeamish woman wants a man who’ll set and empty the traps, and can therefore bear the brunt of guilt for mouse ‘murder’.

 
 
hannahtoo
 
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31 March 2018 16:17
 

It makes us human—we can kill when we need to, for survival, but we should feel some remorse about it, or else we are too cruel.  Some pet stores sell mice and rats.  They can be incredibly cute.  But wild ones in the house carry diseases and ruin the food in our pantry.  (In my state, hantavirus and plague kill some people every year.)  So we set out the traps, that hopefully kill quickly, if not instantly. 

I recently read a friend’s Facebook posting lamenting the cruelty of drinking dairy milk.  The calves are separated from their mothers so that the females can produce milk for market.  And the cow goes through pregnancy, separation, and milking several times in her lifetime.  The poster was a vegan, and she feels for the cows.  However, I think (but kept my thoughts to myself, since I use Facebook to see photos of friends and family, not to argue) that every form of modern eating involves some problem.  Most fruits and vegetables are harvested by people sweating in the sun, paid low wages, possibly worried about deportation.  They may be exposed to pesticides as well.  I think it would be pretty hard in my area, and probably unaffordable, to eat only food raised by well-paid organic farmers using all environmentally-friendly methods.  And what of the cotton in my clothes?  The wool in my carpets?  Our towns and farms and recreations that displace the native places where wildlife once bred and sheltered? 

We cannot live without creating some death.  When we realize this, we can try to cut back on unnecessary impacts. of course.  The fact that impacts are inevitable places us firmly in the web of existence, where we are connected to all other life forms.  Ancient humans, who gave thanks to their prey for sustaining them, and who saw other species as their kin, had a kind of wisdom that has largely been forgotten.

 
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31 March 2018 17:26
 
hannahtoo - 31 March 2018 04:17 PM

It makes us human—we can kill when we need to, for survival, but we should feel some remorse about it, or else we are too cruel.  Some pet stores sell mice and rats.  They can be incredibly cute.  But wild ones in the house carry diseases and ruin the food in our pantry.  (In my state, hantavirus and plague kill some people every year.)  So we set out the traps, that hopefully kill quickly, if not instantly. 

I recently read a friend’s Facebook posting lamenting the cruelty of drinking dairy milk.  The calves are separated from their mothers so that the females can produce milk for market.  And the cow goes through pregnancy, separation, and milking several times in her lifetime.  The poster was a vegan, and she feels for the cows.  However, I think (but kept my thoughts to myself, since I use Facebook to see photos of friends and family, not to argue) that every form of modern eating involves some problem.  Most fruits and vegetables are harvested by people sweating in the sun, paid low wages, possibly worried about deportation.  They may be exposed to pesticides as well.  I think it would be pretty hard in my area, and probably unaffordable, to eat only food raised by well-paid organic farmers using all environmentally-friendly methods.  And what of the cotton in my clothes?  The wool in my carpets?  Our towns and farms and recreations that displace the native places where wildlife once bred and sheltered? 

We cannot live without creating some death.  When we realize this, we can try to cut back on unnecessary impacts. of course.  The fact that impacts are inevitable places us firmly in the web of existence, where we are connected to all other life forms.  Ancient humans, who gave thanks to their prey for sustaining them, and who saw other species as their kin, had a kind of wisdom that has largely been forgotten.

Yes, I agree.  We should only kill when necessary and as humanely as possible.  And remorse can ensure we do this.  I also think our culture could learn something from indigenous and ancient peoples who had more respect for other species.

I know that many people don’t like a lot of government regulations, but I would like to see the food industry heavily regulated (and enforced) in regards to prevention of cruelty to animals.  I saw a documentary not long ago showing the horrible conditions in which some egg-laying chickens are kept.  They were kept in incredible small cages, allowing little movement and which caused injury.  From then on, we only buy eggs from free range chickens, which are now readily available at most grocery stores, presumably because of more awareness and demand by consumers.  Where I live, regulations have been passed that require a gradual changeover to enhanced cages, but in the meantime ...

As consumers, I guess all we can do is try our best to make the most humane choices possible.

 

 
 
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