Antonio Damasio on Big Think

 
saeed
 
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saeed
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28 April 2018 03:34
 

The “Big Think” podcast has an interesting format, in which after host Jason Gots interviews someone, his guest is asked to extemporaneously react to short clips of prior interviews. 

In this episode, he interviews author/neuroscientist Antonio Damasio.  During their conversation, a Spinozian view on homeostasis, the advent of cooperation/conflict during evolution (prior to the emergence of consciousness), where ‘mind’ resides (hint: not just in the brain), the importance of emotions, the boundary of cooperative spheres (i.e. at what level of organization is the functional ‘other’ perceived/felt), and many other topics are discussed. 

Episode link:  http://bigthink.com/think-again-podcast/where-is-my-mind-nil-antonio-damasio-nil-think-again-a-big-think-podcast-144
RSS feed:  http://feeds.feedburner.com/ThinkAgainABigThinkPodcast

[ Edited: 28 April 2018 03:42 by saeed]
 
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28 April 2018 06:35
 

Excellent podcast.  The idea of feelings being ambassadors of our homeostasis and sense of well-being was particularly interesting.  Thanks for posting the link.  I listened to it while my truck was being serviced - great way to pass the time!

 
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28 April 2018 09:37
 

He also somewhat confirms what I wrote in the Struggle thread, about the inherent conflict that exists between living things and their environment.  We interpret it as struggle.  It’s our fight against the things that try to kill us, and that is, in part, what gives rise to our moral sense.

 
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saeed
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28 April 2018 14:23
 
EN - 28 April 2018 09:37 AM

He also somewhat confirms what I wrote in the Struggle thread, about the inherent conflict that exists between living things and their environment.  We interpret it as struggle.  It’s our fight against the things that try to kill us, and that is, in part, what gives rise to our moral sense.

Interesting point!