Another Reason to Get a Tattoo

 
Antisocialdarwinist
 
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Antisocialdarwinist
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29 May 2018 13:56
 
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GAD
 
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GAD
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29 May 2018 16:29
 

That made me cringe.

 
 
RoseTylerFan
 
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RoseTylerFan
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30 May 2018 03:11
 

Disgusting.

I prefer to preserve my skin’s original nobility :D

 
hannahtoo
 
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hannahtoo
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30 May 2018 07:02
 

Well, I agree that it is not any weirder to preserve a tattoo than to keep an urn of a person’s ashes on your mantel.  And through the 1800’s, it was not unusual to cast a death mask of the deceased.  As a matter of fact, the manikin used in all CPR training (Resusci Anne) is based on a death mask of an unknown young woman who drowned in the Seine in the 1880’s.  How’s that for strange?

I’ve celebrated the start of summer the past few years by getting a henna tattoo.  It’s just henna dye painted onto the skin, and it only lasts about 2 weeks.  But I’ve gotten some interesting reactions from friends/acquaintances.  A few years back, I attended a post-school-year training in June, and I got a near reprimand from a colleague because staff was not allowed to have visible tattoos.  I just smiled and let her know it was temporary, and anyway, it was outside the school term.  This year we had some (conservative Christian) friends over for dinner, and their eyes got big when they saw the design on my arm, but they said nothing.  Maybe they think it’s an ink tattoo, and I’ve gone bonkers.

Actually it’s fun to have a tattoo for awhile.  I always get something pretty—no skulls, etc.  Makes me kinda want a real tattoo.  But yeah, that’s a big leap.

 
Cheshire Cat
 
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Cheshire Cat
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30 May 2018 13:18
 

Wow, great idea.

Collect your whole family – then have them made into a lampshade.

 
 
hannahtoo
 
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hannahtoo
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30 May 2018 15:22
 

Then there are the Torajan villages in Indonesia where corpses remain a member of the family.

For Torajans, the death of the body isn’t the abrupt, final, severing event of the West. Instead, death is just one step in a long, gradually unfolding process. Late loved ones are tended at home for weeks, months, or even years after death…
...Torajans believe that people aren’t really dead when they die and that a profound human connection lasts well past death. Death for many Torajans is not a brick wall but a gauze veil. It is not a severing but just another kind of connection. Often in Toraja the deep link with a loved one doesn’t end at the grave. Periodically some northern Torajans bring their relatives out of their tombs to give them fresh clothing and burial shrouds.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2016/04/death-dying-grief-funeral-ceremony-corpse/?beta=true