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Depressed?

 
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29 July 2018 10:42
 
Jan_CAN - 27 July 2018 01:18 PM

Some of what’s being discussed here seems to be about what people can do to reduce stress, lead a happier life, avoid undue sadness – which is all good but does little for actual depression.

Serious depression makes much of this impossible.  Once in the depths of despair (brain chemistry changes?), one can become completely unable to quiet the mind, creativity is impossible, decisiveness is impossible, genuine laughter is impossible, living in such a moment is awful and a better future cannot be envisioned.  Sometimes life’s tragedies, or one’s brain chemistry, can lead to a complete inability to cope, no matter how much effort is made.  It may seem like a cop-out, but sometimes antidepressants really are the answer.

Speaking of antidepressants, was it Brother Mario who once told us that without the Bible, God, Jesus, Catholicism, and his daily communication with God - his life would not be worth living?  This is a far-cry from the state of mind of happy children who have never heard of Bibles or Gods, or lambs jumping for joy soon after they are born.  Are many people saved from depression by their religious thoughts?

“Keep the people hypnotized and they will feel better - at least for a while.” - Franz Mesmer

I’m guessing that for people like Mario the thought of not existing is anathema.  Their religion is the bulwark against this - against such heresies as believing that the self no longer exists when the brain dies.

Another peculiarity of antidepressants mentioned in the OP article is that some patients suffering from depression feel better when given a placebo in a clinical trial.  (when neither doctor nor patient knew if the pill was medicine or a placebo).

However, we know that trace amounts of ingested or inhaled substances can quickly change how we feel.  The smoker who decided to go cold turkey saved from suicide by   having another cigarette . . . the person unable to see any light at the end of the tunnel revived by his prescription and goes off to the office whistling and smiling . . . the teen at a party swallowing a Mickey and experiencing euphoria or raison d’etre.

 
 
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29 July 2018 11:11
 
unsmoked - 29 July 2018 10:42 AM
Jan_CAN - 27 July 2018 01:18 PM

Some of what’s being discussed here seems to be about what people can do to reduce stress, lead a happier life, avoid undue sadness – which is all good but does little for actual depression.

Serious depression makes much of this impossible.  Once in the depths of despair (brain chemistry changes?), one can become completely unable to quiet the mind, creativity is impossible, decisiveness is impossible, genuine laughter is impossible, living in such a moment is awful and a better future cannot be envisioned.  Sometimes life’s tragedies, or one’s brain chemistry, can lead to a complete inability to cope, no matter how much effort is made.  It may seem like a cop-out, but sometimes antidepressants really are the answer.

Speaking of antidepressants, was it Brother Mario who once told us that without the Bible, God, Jesus, Catholicism, and his daily communication with God - his life would not be worth living?  This is a far-cry from the state of mind of happy children who have never heard of Bibles or Gods, or lambs jumping for joy soon after they are born.  Are many people saved from depression by their religious thoughts?

“Keep the people hypnotized and they will feel better - at least for a while.” - Franz Mesmer

I’m guessing that for people like Mario the thought of not existing is anathema.  Their religion is the bulwark against this - against such heresies as believing that the self no longer exists when the brain dies.

Another peculiarity of antidepressants mentioned in the OP article is that some patients suffering from depression feel better when given a placebo in a clinical trial.  (when neither doctor nor patient knew if the pill was medicine or a placebo).

However, we know that trace amounts of ingested or inhaled substances can quickly change how we feel.  The smoker who decided to go cold turkey saved from suicide by   having another cigarette . . . the person unable to see any light at the end of the tunnel revived by his prescription and goes off to the office whistling and smiling . . . the teen at a party swallowing a Mickey and experiencing euphoria or raison d’etre.

I think there is a general misconception here in regards to the seriousness of clinical depression.  (However, perhaps posters on this thread prefer to discuss all this in a different light.)

As with all classes of medications, there will be misuses and over-prescribing, but that does not mean that these are not effective and valuable treatments.  I very much doubt that a placebo would help a correctly diagnosed patient with severe depression any more than it would a cancer patient.  Clinical depression is a real illness, which sometimes requires medical intervention.  I have no doubt that antidepressants save lives.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4243156/Antidepressants-not-perfect-save-lives.html

[ Edited: 29 July 2018 11:35 by Jan_CAN]
 
 
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29 July 2018 12:21
 
Jan_CAN - 29 July 2018 11:11 AM
unsmoked - 29 July 2018 10:42 AM
Jan_CAN - 27 July 2018 01:18 PM

Some of what’s being discussed here seems to be about what people can do to reduce stress, lead a happier life, avoid undue sadness – which is all good but does little for actual depression.

Serious depression makes much of this impossible.  Once in the depths of despair (brain chemistry changes?), one can become completely unable to quiet the mind, creativity is impossible, decisiveness is impossible, genuine laughter is impossible, living in such a moment is awful and a better future cannot be envisioned.  Sometimes life’s tragedies, or one’s brain chemistry, can lead to a complete inability to cope, no matter how much effort is made.  It may seem like a cop-out, but sometimes antidepressants really are the answer.

Speaking of antidepressants, was it Brother Mario who once told us that without the Bible, God, Jesus, Catholicism, and his daily communication with God - his life would not be worth living?  This is a far-cry from the state of mind of happy children who have never heard of Bibles or Gods, or lambs jumping for joy soon after they are born.  Are many people saved from depression by their religious thoughts?

“Keep the people hypnotized and they will feel better - at least for a while.” - Franz Mesmer

I’m guessing that for people like Mario the thought of not existing is anathema.  Their religion is the bulwark against this - against such heresies as believing that the self no longer exists when the brain dies.

Another peculiarity of antidepressants mentioned in the OP article is that some patients suffering from depression feel better when given a placebo in a clinical trial.  (when neither doctor nor patient knew if the pill was medicine or a placebo).

However, we know that trace amounts of ingested or inhaled substances can quickly change how we feel.  The smoker who decided to go cold turkey saved from suicide by   having another cigarette . . . the person unable to see any light at the end of the tunnel revived by his prescription and goes off to the office whistling and smiling . . . the teen at a party swallowing a Mickey and experiencing euphoria or raison d’etre.

I think there is a general misconception here in regards to the seriousness of clinical depression.  (However, perhaps posters on this thread prefer to discuss all this in a different light.)

As with all classes of medications, there will be misuses and over-prescribing, but that does not mean that these are not effective and valuable treatments.  I very much doubt that a placebo would help a correctly diagnosed patient with severe depression any more than it would a cancer patient.  Clinical depression is a real illness, which sometimes requires medical intervention.  I have no doubt that antidepressants save lives.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4243156/Antidepressants-not-perfect-save-lives.html

Agreed.  I meant to imply that in my last paragraph.  https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/article/explainer-what-dopamine

 
 
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30 July 2018 12:00
LadyJane
 
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31 July 2018 10:29
 

There was an HBO documentary recently about Robin Williams who apparently suffered from Lewy Body Dementia, which I’d never heard of before, where protein deposits in the brain disrupt the thought process and ability to reason.  That coupled with the physical symptoms were enough to bring an abrupt halt to his seemingly boundless energy.  Imagine being saddled with that particular affliction after spending decades entertaining people worldwide at break neck speed, fuelled almost exclusively by laughter, only to have the rug ripped out from beneath you.  I figured his suicide was the result of your run of the mill depression.  The dark yang to his witty yin.  I guess it’s never quite that simple.

 
 
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01 August 2018 00:55
 
LadyJane - 31 July 2018 10:29 AM

There was an HBO documentary recently about Robin Williams who apparently suffered from Lewy Body Dementia, which I’d never heard of before, where protein deposits in the brain disrupt the thought process and ability to reason.  That coupled with the physical symptoms were enough to bring an abrupt halt to his seemingly boundless energy.  Imagine being saddled with that particular affliction after spending decades entertaining people worldwide at break neck speed, fuelled almost exclusively by laughter, only to have the rug ripped out from beneath you.  I figured his suicide was the result of your run of the mill depression.  The dark yang to his witty yin.  I guess it’s never quite that simple.

Likewise. When I found out about the Lewy Body Dementia, the suicide seemed a much more rational act.

 
 
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