Laughter is Contagious

 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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17 August 2018 10:27
 

A few weeks ago Lady Jane posted this video in a Funway topic called, ‘The Mystery of Humor’.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fM45JMTpkBU

I’ve watched it at least 5 times, days apart, and each time I end up wiping my eyes.  What’s going on here?  I doubt that this is a recently evolved human trait.  Image a group of our near relatives a million years ago . . . Alley Oop has climbed a tree to raid a beehive while his tribe waits below to catch the honeycomb.  He gets stung on the butt, almost looses his grip and his daughter titters.  Someone else chuckles at the daughter’s amusement and the laughter spreads.  Oop looks down and sees everyone rolling on the ground helpless with laughter, covering their faces, afraid of his anger.  The first honeycomb comes down, Oop gets stung again, and the laughter infects Oop.  He tumbles down, rolling helplessly with the others, pointing at his stings. 

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/mental-health/laughter-is-the-best-medicine.htm

quote:  ‘LAUGHTER IS GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

“Laughter relaxes the whole body. A good, hearty laugh relieves physical tension and stress, leaving your muscles relaxed for up to 45 minutes after.

Laughter boosts the immune system. Laughter decreases stress hormones and increases immune cells and infection-fighting antibodies, thus improving your resistance to disease.

Laughter triggers the release of endorphins, the body’s natural feel-good chemicals. Endorphins promote an overall sense of well-being and can even temporarily relieve pain.

Laughter protects the heart. Laughter improves the function of blood vessels and increases blood flow, which can help protect you against a heart attack and other cardiovascular problems.

Laughter burns calories. OK, so it’s no replacement for going to the gym, but one study found that laughing for 10 to 15 minutes a day can burn about 40 calories—which could be enough to lose three or four pounds over the course of a year.

Laughter lightens anger’s heavy load. Nothing diffuses anger and conflict faster than a shared laugh. Looking at the funny side can put problems into perspective and enable you to move on from confrontations without holding onto bitterness or resentment.

Laughter may even help you to live longer. A study in Norway found that people with a strong sense of humor outlived those who don’t laugh as much. The difference was particularly notable for those battling cancer.”

https://www.livescience.com/9430-study-laughter-contagious.html

https://science.howstuffworks.com/life/endorphins.htm

quote:  “It’s not uncommon to hear someone talk about getting an “endorphin rush.” Sex, exercise, even hot peppers—all sorts of things are credited for these euphoric highs. So what are endorphins, and are they really responsible for our feelings of excitement or satisfaction?

In the early 1970s, researchers were studying how the brain is affected by opiates, such as heroin or morphine. They found that opiates interact with specialized receptors in cells that are primarily massed in the brain and spinal cord. When opiates enter these receptors, they hinder or block the cell’s transmission of pain signals. But why, wondered the scientists studying this phenomenon, would these specialized receptors exist in the first place? The most plausible answer was that opioid receptors exist due to the presence of an opiatelike substance produced naturally in the body.”

Q:  Do fundamentalist preachers know how to stimulate an ‘endorphin rush’ in their congregation?

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Poldano
 
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18 August 2018 02:34
 

I think they do. A lot may have to do with their delivery, rather than the words they use or the concepts they communicate. An interesting experiment would be to show videos with sound of orators in foreign languages and gauge viewers responses. Actually, it’s probably also a good idea to test with separate sight and sound feeds as well. Think of how well some politicians like Ted Cruz and (to a lesser extent) Bill Clinton mimic preacher-like intonations and delivery in their speeches.

 
 
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18 August 2018 11:16
 
Poldano - 18 August 2018 02:34 AM

I think they do. A lot may have to do with their delivery, rather than the words they use or the concepts they communicate. An interesting experiment would be to show videos with sound of orators in foreign languages and gauge viewers responses. Actually, it’s probably also a good idea to test with separate sight and sound feeds as well. Think of how well some politicians like Ted Cruz and (to a lesser extent) Bill Clinton mimic preacher-like intonations and delivery in their speeches.

We attempt to reason with people not realizing that when they all wear red hats and shout “Lock her up” in unison, they’re experiencing a natural high?

[ Edited: 18 August 2018 11:22 by unsmoked]
 
 
ubique13
 
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ubique13
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18 August 2018 12:22
 
unsmoked - 17 August 2018 10:27 AM

A few weeks ago Lady Jane posted this video in a Funway topic called, ‘The Mystery of Humor’.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fM45JMTpkBU

I’ve watched it at least 5 times, days apart, and each time I end up wiping my eyes.  What’s going on here?  I doubt that this is a recently evolved human trait.  Image a group of our near relatives a million years ago . . . Alley Oop has climbed a tree to raid a beehive while his tribe waits below to catch the honeycomb.  He gets stung on the butt, almost looses his grip and his daughter titters.  Someone else chuckles at the daughter’s amusement and the laughter spreads.  Oop looks down and sees everyone rolling on the ground helpless with laughter, covering their faces, afraid of his anger.  The first honeycomb comes down, Oop gets stung again, and the laughter infects Oop.  He tumbles down, rolling helplessly with the others, pointing at his stings. 

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/mental-health/laughter-is-the-best-medicine.htm

quote:  ‘LAUGHTER IS GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

“Laughter relaxes the whole body. A good, hearty laugh relieves physical tension and stress, leaving your muscles relaxed for up to 45 minutes after.

Laughter boosts the immune system. Laughter decreases stress hormones and increases immune cells and infection-fighting antibodies, thus improving your resistance to disease.

Laughter triggers the release of endorphins, the body’s natural feel-good chemicals. Endorphins promote an overall sense of well-being and can even temporarily relieve pain.

Laughter protects the heart. Laughter improves the function of blood vessels and increases blood flow, which can help protect you against a heart attack and other cardiovascular problems.

Laughter burns calories. OK, so it’s no replacement for going to the gym, but one study found that laughing for 10 to 15 minutes a day can burn about 40 calories—which could be enough to lose three or four pounds over the course of a year.

Laughter lightens anger’s heavy load. Nothing diffuses anger and conflict faster than a shared laugh. Looking at the funny side can put problems into perspective and enable you to move on from confrontations without holding onto bitterness or resentment.

Laughter may even help you to live longer. A study in Norway found that people with a strong sense of humor outlived those who don’t laugh as much. The difference was particularly notable for those battling cancer.”

https://www.livescience.com/9430-study-laughter-contagious.html

https://science.howstuffworks.com/life/endorphins.htm

quote:  “It’s not uncommon to hear someone talk about getting an “endorphin rush.” Sex, exercise, even hot peppers—all sorts of things are credited for these euphoric highs. So what are endorphins, and are they really responsible for our feelings of excitement or satisfaction?

In the early 1970s, researchers were studying how the brain is affected by opiates, such as heroin or morphine. They found that opiates interact with specialized receptors in cells that are primarily massed in the brain and spinal cord. When opiates enter these receptors, they hinder or block the cell’s transmission of pain signals. But why, wondered the scientists studying this phenomenon, would these specialized receptors exist in the first place? The most plausible answer was that opioid receptors exist due to the presence of an opiatelike substance produced naturally in the body.”

Q:  Do fundamentalist preachers know how to stimulate an ‘endorphin rush’ in their congregation?

If I’m not mistaken, endorphin is best compared to endogenous morphine. The most compelling explanations that I’ve heard for the human body’s innate opioid and cannabinoid receptors suggest that we evolved symbiotically with both the poppy and cannabis flowers.

Regarding preachers, they are absolutely trained to manipulate. In James Baldwin’s ‘The Fire Next Time’, he describes his experience growing up in the church, and remarks how similar being a preacher seemed to him like being a pimp.

 
 
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19 August 2018 01:29
 
unsmoked - 18 August 2018 11:16 AM
Poldano - 18 August 2018 02:34 AM

I think they do. A lot may have to do with their delivery, rather than the words they use or the concepts they communicate. An interesting experiment would be to show videos with sound of orators in foreign languages and gauge viewers responses. Actually, it’s probably also a good idea to test with separate sight and sound feeds as well. Think of how well some politicians like Ted Cruz and (to a lesser extent) Bill Clinton mimic preacher-like intonations and delivery in their speeches.

We attempt to reason with people not realizing that when they all wear red hats and shout “Lock her up” in unison, they’re experiencing a natural high?

That succinctly describes the situation, in my opinion.

 

 
 
ubique13
 
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19 August 2018 14:25
 
Poldano - 19 August 2018 01:29 AM
unsmoked - 18 August 2018 11:16 AM
Poldano - 18 August 2018 02:34 AM

I think they do. A lot may have to do with their delivery, rather than the words they use or the concepts they communicate. An interesting experiment would be to show videos with sound of orators in foreign languages and gauge viewers responses. Actually, it’s probably also a good idea to test with separate sight and sound feeds as well. Think of how well some politicians like Ted Cruz and (to a lesser extent) Bill Clinton mimic preacher-like intonations and delivery in their speeches.

We attempt to reason with people not realizing that when they all wear red hats and shout “Lock her up” in unison, they’re experiencing a natural high?

That succinctly describes the situation, in my opinion.

Beware the power of groupthink and mob mentality.

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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13 February 2019 20:28
 

Did laughter make the mind?
A psychological relief valve and a guard against despotism, laughter is a uniquely human – and collective – activity
https://aeon.co/essays/does-laughter-hold-the-key-to-human-consciousness


“Humans are instinctive egalitarians, who work best with one another when no one has absolute authority, when teasing is good-natured, when there is sufficient affection and trust for shared tasks to constitute their own reward. Laughter is a vital part of this picture – not simply a psychological relief valve, but a collective guard against despotism. When moved to laugh by those around us, we reveal ourselves to be truly human.”