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Nothing better than a cork!

 
LadyJane
 
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LadyJane
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28 August 2018 13:16
 

Precious materials are hard to come by and cork is slowly being replaced with plastic. 

Change makes people nervous and like any transition you’ve got to ease into it slowly to fully absorb the reasons why.  That requires the altering of perception in order to appreciate a different way of doing things.  Very difficult in a world that caters to those demanding immediate gratification.  There are spaces to fill and we clamour to fill them in order to contain the contents inside.  The ones we’ve come to value.  Are we receptive to new ideas?  Are we willing to see them through?  Whether we adhere to religious beliefs or philosophical assumptions we tend to eagerly fill those spaces right up until the point at which it meets our satisfaction.  And not an inch beyond that point.  Is that enough?  It is for some.

We tend to forget these temporary measures were never meant to be permanent.  We become complacent the moment our fleeting desires are satisfied and fail to notice the focus has shifted from discovering what actually lives in those spaces and continue on without question.  We reach that level of comfort where the thinking is done and the task is complete.  Then we forget to examine the contents while wandering around drunk on all the wrong answers.  From the flippant to the dogmatic.  Pretending things matter when they mean nothing at all.  We hang onto nonsense when it makes us feel good.  And when the bottle is empty the cork has no use.  Where is the value once we drink it all in?

The empty bottle can be quite useful when you’re using your noggin.  All’s ya need is a screw top.

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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28 August 2018 13:49
 

How do you know when you have come to the end of analysis, and when do you put the screw cap on?  Do you always have to be open to “new ideas”, or is there a point when you can say “I’ve thought about this enough”? It’s easy to see when a bottle is empty; not so easy to see when the bottle itself has outlived its usefulness.

 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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28 August 2018 20:11
 
LadyJane - 28 August 2018 01:16 PM

Precious materials are hard to come by and cork is slowly being replaced with plastic. 

Change makes people nervous and like any transition you’ve got to ease into it slowly to fully absorb the reasons why.  That requires the altering of perception in order to appreciate a different way of doing things.  Very difficult in a world that caters to those demanding immediate gratification.  There are spaces to fill and we clamour to fill them in order to contain the contents inside.  The ones we’ve come to value.  Are we receptive to new ideas?  Are we willing to see them through?  Whether we adhere to religious beliefs or philosophical assumptions we tend to eagerly fill those spaces right up until the point at which it meets our satisfaction.  And not an inch beyond that point.  Is that enough?  It is for some.

We tend to forget these temporary measures were never meant to be permanent.  We become complacent the moment our fleeting desires are satisfied and fail to notice the focus has shifted from discovering what actually lives in those spaces and continue on without question.  We reach that level of comfort where the thinking is done and the task is complete.  Then we forget to examine the contents while wandering around drunk on all the wrong answers.  From the flippant to the dogmatic.  Pretending things matter when they mean nothing at all.  We hang onto nonsense when it makes us feel good.  And when the bottle is empty the cork has no use.  Where is the value once we drink it all in?

The empty bottle can be quite useful when you’re using your noggin.  All’s ya need is a screw top.

Out of curiosity, I googled around a bit looking for info on the cork v. screw-on cap controversy, but I was unable to find any consensus on the matter. I think hard-core wine aficionados, including plenty of winery pros, are essentially religious in that they obsessively adhere to traditions they feel comfortable with yet are meaningless to the world outside of wine experts—practically everyone in the world! They typically react with moral indignation when certain lines get crossed. I’m no winery insider, so I’m looking at this strictly from the outside. Some of those guys seem like religious fundamentalists, and I can’t help but assume that the Big Wine companies essentially prop up the profits by way of expertly executed con artistry. It seems almost church-like.

 
 
Nhoj Morley
 
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Nhoj Morley
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28 August 2018 23:07
 
nonverbal - 28 August 2018 11:15 AM

Nhoj, I should have added that I don’t mean to imply that religious faith amounts to clinical obsession, though “beliefs” can indeed be as strong as, or perhaps even stronger than nonreligious obsessions. But religious obsessions are not commonly thought of as obsessions, and that sort of takes them out of the running. They’re in their own category.

I would not mean clinical either. Forgive my confusion but I’m not sure what the other option is. We can account for having emotions and for having perceptions. If obsessions are their own category, then I must ask, category of what?

I think what you are alluding to can be described as an interaction of perception and emotion without any need for a further component. Normally, I would not bother with a distinction like clinical but it sounds like it contrasts with this religious-like obsession category. They should be distinguished, but only as two kinds of interaction of emotion and perception.

Beliefs, religious or otherwise, have a Run factor. They manifest in a unfolding process that has to play out to be effective. That makes them unlike a single unwanted bio-electric cue. The workings of our perception on our emotional centers are to blame in either case. You seem to be suggesting a more intangible culprit.

 
 
Poldano
 
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Poldano
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29 August 2018 01:36
 
burt - 28 August 2018 08:44 AM
Poldano - 27 August 2018 11:57 PM
burt - 26 August 2018 10:45 AM

...

The physicist Roland Omnes took a dictionary definition of the sacred as something that “…merits an absolute respect, which may be considered as an absolute value,” and points out that everything, no matter how apparently haphazard, is the result of the action of fundamental laws, which are absolute. Thus he asserts that:
“…the sacred is everywhere …and nothing is completely profane. Profanity is but an illusion of our own ignorance, the slumber of the mind or the madness of our false ideas.”

That’s a tremendous take on sacred.

From my point of view (getting back on topic, sorta), reality is sacred, and the grounds for analysis is never completely fulfilled. Analysis merely pauses when one has managed to undermine the grounds from which one previously analyzed.

Turtles all the way down.

If turtles are metaphorical stand-ins for questions, then the metaphor applies.

 
 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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29 August 2018 05:55
 
Nhoj Morley - 28 August 2018 11:07 PM
nonverbal - 28 August 2018 11:15 AM

Nhoj, I should have added that I don’t mean to imply that religious faith amounts to clinical obsession, though “beliefs” can indeed be as strong as, or perhaps even stronger than nonreligious obsessions. But religious obsessions are not commonly thought of as obsessions, and that sort of takes them out of the running. They’re in their own category.

I would not mean clinical either. Forgive my confusion but I’m not sure what the other option is. We can account for having emotions and for having perceptions. If obsessions are their own category, then I must ask, category of what?

I think what you are alluding to can be described as an interaction of perception and emotion without any need for a further component. Normally, I would not bother with a distinction like clinical but it sounds like it contrasts with this religious-like obsession category. They should be distinguished, but only as two kinds of interaction of emotion and perception.

Beliefs, religious or otherwise, have a Run factor. They manifest in a unfolding process that has to play out to be effective. That makes them unlike a single unwanted bio-electric cue. The workings of our perception on our emotional centers are to blame in either case. You seem to be suggesting a more intangible culprit.

How do I differentiate religious obsession from clinical obsession? I think that’s what you’re asking. A religious obsession need not be debilitating or even the cause of discomfort. That seems to me to be the main difference. Plenty of religiously devout people seem to take great pleasure in their relationship with God. But for those who focus more on the fine print, the Holy Bible seems to be anything but holy! First time I really looked it over, all I could say was Holy shit! I was 17 at the time, and I actually stayed with it until age 40 or so.

A person can benefit a great deal as a result of becoming a devout follower of whichever religion locally prevails. By doing so, you immerse yourself in morality—social expectation—concerns you might otherwise ignore till later in your life. Or if somehow you find yourself uncomfortably obsessed with alcohol, drugs, or unwanted thoughts, a good long dip in the religion pool can support you like nothing else, including healthy nyeeps if you’re fastidious. As an aside, I’d say most Bruces who post here are exceptionally healthy in their faith. I don’t know that, but it sure seems to be the case.

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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29 August 2018 08:10
 
nonverbal - 29 August 2018 05:55 AM

A person can benefit a great deal as a result of becoming a devout follower of whichever religion locally prevails. By doing so, you immerse yourself in morality—social expectation—concerns you might otherwise ignore till later in your life. Or if somehow you find yourself uncomfortably obsessed with alcohol, drugs, or unwanted thoughts, a good long dip in the religion pool can support you like nothing else, including healthy nyeeps if you’re fastidious. As an aside, I’d say most Bruces who post here are exceptionally healthy in their faith. I don’t know that, but it sure seems to be the case.

I won’t comment on my health or any other Bruce’s health, but I don’t see my faith as an obsession.  It’s a way of looking at and understanding the world, a perception (as nhoj points out), but it’s not something I get OCD about. Religious faith goes all over the spectrum on this point, however, and I do see it as an obsession in some folks.  Trump talking to evangelical leaders, telling them that if the GOP loses it’s the beginning of the end, that violence will come, that they will no longer be able to say “Merry Christmas”, that all is lost - if they believe that bullshit, they are obsessed. Not sure how to characterize the spell that he has them under.  On the other end of the spectrum, faith can simply be one aspect of one’s world view, mixed in with other cultural and personal influences.

 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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29 August 2018 09:17
 

My apologies, Bruce. I’m afraid I’m not expressing myself very well.

 
 
GAD
 
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GAD
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29 August 2018 09:48
 
nonverbal - 29 August 2018 09:17 AM

My apologies, Bruce. I’m afraid I’m not expressing myself very well.

Don’t worry, we’re used to it.

 
 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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29 August 2018 11:43
 

I know my limits, GAD, hence my name. Do you know yours?

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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29 August 2018 11:56
 
nonverbal - 29 August 2018 09:17 AM

My apologies, Bruce. I’m afraid I’m not expressing myself very well.

I thought you did fine, I was just responding to the post.  No worries.

 
GAD
 
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GAD
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29 August 2018 17:44
 
nonverbal - 29 August 2018 11:43 AM

I know my limits, GAD, hence my name. Do you know yours?

I was just returning the love you gave me a while back.

 
 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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29 August 2018 18:06
 
GAD - 29 August 2018 05:44 PM
nonverbal - 29 August 2018 11:43 AM

I know my limits, GAD, hence my name. Do you know yours?

I was just returning the love you gave me a while back.

But I never say anything negative—what are you talking about? Well, er . . . I’ve probably dished out plenty, but I don’t recall specifics as far as addressing you. My apologies, anyway.

 
 
burt
 
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30 August 2018 15:46
GAD
 
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GAD
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30 August 2018 16:00
 
burt - 30 August 2018 03:46 PM

http://existentialcomics.com/comic/252

Yep!

 
 
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