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Time for a little break?

 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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09 October 2018 16:57
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 04:40 PM

One smart frakin’ mouse—an anecdote. 

We live in the woods, so we get mice in the house.  No matter what we do, they get in.  So naturally we try to catch them, but being humane lovers of all things great and small, we use Mouse Cubes, a live trap with a slopping door that the mouse crawls under to get to the food, so it falls back down behind it, sealing it in.  It’s a clever little device that helps us get rid of the mice and preserve our consciences as well (those mice, after all, are just trying to make a living like anyone else).

Well, as clever as that trap is, there is a clever mouse.  One time last week I checked the trap, only to find it turned over on its side and the bait gone.  The door would swing sideways this way, preventing it from slamming down behind the mouse.  I told myself I must have set it wrong, suspicious though I was that I hadn’t.  So I resent the trap.

Last night while watching TV, I heard the trap moving in the kitchen (the little stinkers love the kitchen).  I got up and found the trap on its side, but with the bait still in it.  Mousus interuptus.  So my wife had an idea.  We wedged the trap between a cooler we’d left out and the cabinet baseboard, this way the mouse couldn’t turn it over.  TV watching resumed.

Not five minutes later we heard the trap moving again.  This time the stinker had pulled the trap out from between the cooler and the cabinet, then turned it over, but we got there before he could get the bait.  So we reset it, this time wedging it in and taping it to the floor.  TV watching resumed

Bingo.  Quite a while later, after I’d gone to bed, my wife heard the door clank down and sure enough, she checked the trap and there was the mouse.  Apparently mouse rationality only goes so far, with its instinct for food overriding its avoidance of a trap, if there is no foreseeable way to avoid it.  Call it a delayed or frustrated gratification problem, not a problem of mouse cleverness.  In any case, I took the mouse out and drove it down to the grassy right-of-way the power lines run through in order to release it.  A mouse that clever surely deserves to go free.

In retrospect I almost wish I’d kept the thing ‘til morning, then gone out and bought an aquarium to keep it as a pet.  But on a second thought a mouse that clever deserves to be free, to make it on its own in the world through its own resourcefulness, in the wild where it belongs.  But damn, that was one smart mouse.  Nothing but respect for the little stinker, as annoying as they are.

Smart, no doubt. But did the mouse actually understand the trap?

 
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
 
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TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
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09 October 2018 17:14
 
nonverbal - 09 October 2018 04:57 PM
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 04:40 PM

One smart frakin’ mouse—an anecdote. 

We live in the woods, so we get mice in the house.  No matter what we do, they get in.  So naturally we try to catch them, but being humane lovers of all things great and small, we use Mouse Cubes, a live trap with a slopping door that the mouse crawls under to get to the food, so it falls back down behind it, sealing it in.  It’s a clever little device that helps us get rid of the mice and preserve our consciences as well (those mice, after all, are just trying to make a living like anyone else).

Well, as clever as that trap is, there is a clever mouse.  One time last week I checked the trap, only to find it turned over on its side and the bait gone.  The door would swing sideways this way, preventing it from slamming down behind the mouse.  I told myself I must have set it wrong, suspicious though I was that I hadn’t.  So I resent the trap.

Last night while watching TV, I heard the trap moving in the kitchen (the little stinkers love the kitchen).  I got up and found the trap on its side, but with the bait still in it.  Mousus interuptus.  So my wife had an idea.  We wedged the trap between a cooler we’d left out and the cabinet baseboard, this way the mouse couldn’t turn it over.  TV watching resumed.

Not five minutes later we heard the trap moving again.  This time the stinker had pulled the trap out from between the cooler and the cabinet, then turned it over, but we got there before he could get the bait.  So we reset it, this time wedging it in and taping it to the floor.  TV watching resumed

Bingo.  Quite a while later, after I’d gone to bed, my wife heard the door clank down and sure enough, she checked the trap and there was the mouse.  Apparently mouse rationality only goes so far, with its instinct for food overriding its avoidance of a trap, if there is no foreseeable way to avoid it.  Call it a delayed or frustrated gratification problem, not a problem of mouse cleverness.  In any case, I took the mouse out and drove it down to the grassy right-of-way the power lines run through in order to release it.  A mouse that clever surely deserves to go free.

In retrospect I almost wish I’d kept the thing ‘til morning, then gone out and bought an aquarium to keep it as a pet.  But on a second thought a mouse that clever deserves to be free, to make it on its own in the world through its own resourcefulness, in the wild where it belongs.  But damn, that was one smart mouse.  Nothing but respect for the little stinker, as annoying as they are.

Smart, no doubt. But did the mouse actually understand the trap?

It’s behavior suggests it did, at least in causal terms of falling objects and barrier to ‘escape’.  For instance, it turned it over on its side to offset the dropping shut of the door.  It did this twice.  When faced with the actuality of not being able to turn it on its side, it re-situated the trap so it could turn it over, then turned it, again, deactivating the door that would prevent ‘escape’.  Where it seems to have been foiled, then, is not in understanding the trap but in being able to use this understanding to overcome the the more fundamental drive to eat.  When there was not a way it could deactivate the trap, it went in for the food, presumably because despite its knowledge of ‘how the trap’ worked, it was hungry.  Did it have a concept of “trap”.  Of course not.  But did it have an appreciation of the causality of the door and its prevention of ‘escape’—clearly.  It’s just, I think, that unlike humans it cannot use this kind of ‘knowledge’ to override the more fundamental instinct to eat present food.  It can delay and avoid to some degree, but when faced with the consequence of not delaying and avoiding versus not actually eating, eating wins out, regardless of what it “knows.”

That’s one Anus’ theory, in any case, and I’m sticking to it!  Vive le mouse.

[ Edited: 10 October 2018 04:57 by TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher]
 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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09 October 2018 17:20
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 04:40 PM

One smart frakin’ mouse—an anecdote. 

We live in the woods, so we get mice in the house.  No matter what we do, they get in.  So naturally we try to catch them, but being humane lovers of all things great and small, we use Mouse Cubes, a live trap with a slopping door that the mouse crawls under to get to the food, so it falls back down behind it, sealing it in.  It’s a clever little device that helps us get rid of the mice and preserve our consciences as well (those mice, after all, are just trying to make a living like anyone else).

Well, as clever as that trap is, there is a clever mouse.  One time last week I checked the trap, only to find it turned over on its side and the bait gone.  The door would swing sideways this way, preventing it from slamming down behind the mouse.  I told myself I must have set it wrong, suspicious though I was that I hadn’t.  So I resent the trap.

Last night while watching TV, I heard the trap moving in the kitchen (the little stinkers love the kitchen).  I got up and found the trap on its side, but with the bait still in it.  Mousus interuptus.  So my wife had an idea.  We wedged the trap between a cooler we’d left out and the cabinet baseboard, this way the mouse couldn’t turn it over.  TV watching resumed.

Not five minutes later we heard the trap moving again.  This time the stinker had pulled the trap out from between the cooler and the cabinet, then turned it over, but we got there before he could get the bait.  So we reset it, this time wedging it in and taping it to the floor.  TV watching resumed

Bingo.  Quite a while later, after I’d gone to bed, my wife heard the door clank down and sure enough, she checked the trap and there was the mouse.  Apparently mouse rationality only goes so far, with its instinct for food overriding its avoidance of a trap, if there is no foreseeable way to avoid it.  Call it a delayed or frustrated gratification problem, not a problem of mouse cleverness.  In any case, I took the mouse out and drove it down to the grassy right-of-way the power lines run through in order to release it.  A mouse that clever surely deserves to go free.

In retrospect I almost wish I’d kept the thing ‘til morning, then gone out and bought an aquarium to keep it as a pet.  But on a second thought a mouse that clever deserves to be free, to make it on its own in the world through its own resourcefulness, in the wild where it belongs.  But damn, that was one smart mouse.  Nothing but respect for the little stinker, as annoying as they are.

Thanks, TAP, for the funny story about your smart and determined mouse.  I also liked the happy ending.

We also, no matter what we do, occasionally get mice in the house.  I actually started a thread (Lament for a mouse) about it last spring.

 

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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09 October 2018 17:28
 

And all the puns are great too!

 
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
 
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TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
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09 October 2018 17:31
 
Jan_CAN - 09 October 2018 05:20 PM
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 04:40 PM

One smart frakin’ mouse—an anecdote. 

We live in the woods, so we get mice in the house.  No matter what we do, they get in.  So naturally we try to catch them, but being humane lovers of all things great and small, we use Mouse Cubes, a live trap with a slopping door that the mouse crawls under to get to the food, so it falls back down behind it, sealing it in.  It’s a clever little device that helps us get rid of the mice and preserve our consciences as well (those mice, after all, are just trying to make a living like anyone else).

Well, as clever as that trap is, there is a clever mouse.  One time last week I checked the trap, only to find it turned over on its side and the bait gone.  The door would swing sideways this way, preventing it from slamming down behind the mouse.  I told myself I must have set it wrong, suspicious though I was that I hadn’t.  So I resent the trap.

Last night while watching TV, I heard the trap moving in the kitchen (the little stinkers love the kitchen).  I got up and found the trap on its side, but with the bait still in it.  Mousus interuptus.  So my wife had an idea.  We wedged the trap between a cooler we’d left out and the cabinet baseboard, this way the mouse couldn’t turn it over.  TV watching resumed.

Not five minutes later we heard the trap moving again.  This time the stinker had pulled the trap out from between the cooler and the cabinet, then turned it over, but we got there before he could get the bait.  So we reset it, this time wedging it in and taping it to the floor.  TV watching resumed

Bingo.  Quite a while later, after I’d gone to bed, my wife heard the door clank down and sure enough, she checked the trap and there was the mouse.  Apparently mouse rationality only goes so far, with its instinct for food overriding its avoidance of a trap, if there is no foreseeable way to avoid it.  Call it a delayed or frustrated gratification problem, not a problem of mouse cleverness.  In any case, I took the mouse out and drove it down to the grassy right-of-way the power lines run through in order to release it.  A mouse that clever surely deserves to go free.

In retrospect I almost wish I’d kept the thing ‘til morning, then gone out and bought an aquarium to keep it as a pet.  But on a second thought a mouse that clever deserves to be free, to make it on its own in the world through its own resourcefulness, in the wild where it belongs.  But damn, that was one smart mouse.  Nothing but respect for the little stinker, as annoying as they are.

Thanks, TAP, for the funny story about your smart and determined mouse.  I also liked the happy ending.

We also, no matter what we do, occasionally get mice in the house.  I actually started a thread (Lament for a mouse) about it last spring.

Mouse Cubes, the way to go.  We worry about the same ones getting back into the house too, which I why I drive them the mile or so down the street to the grassy power line right-of-way.  This keeps them far from the house even as it gives them a place to live (it’s that dense, tall, weed-grass, with bushes).  The woods we live in are otherwise virtually free of undergrowth.

 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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09 October 2018 17:58
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 05:31 PM
Jan_CAN - 09 October 2018 05:20 PM

Thanks, TAP, for the funny story about your smart and determined mouse.  I also liked the happy ending.

We also, no matter what we do, occasionally get mice in the house.  I actually started a thread (Lament for a mouse) about it last spring.

Mouse Cubes, the way to go.  We worry about the same ones getting back into the house too, which I why I drive them the mile or so down the street to the grassy power line right-of-way.  This keeps them far from the house even as it gives them a place to live (it’s that dense, tall, weed-grass, with bushes).  The woods we live in are otherwise virtually free of undergrowth.

Yup, we released them too near our house.  So, they returned, apparently with some of their buddies.  My husband lost patience once the count was over 20 catches – most likely some repeat customers.

 
 
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Jan_CAN
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09 October 2018 17:59
 

How comedy is more sophisticated ‘these days’.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRaF4gk1yhY

and

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCxIDm8TmUw

 

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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09 October 2018 19:03
 

Q:  What’s the difference between an American and a Canadian?
A:  A Canadian not only has a sense of humour but can also spell it.

Q:  What do Canadians get on their tests?
A:  Eh’s

Q:  What’s a Canadian ghost’s favourite food?
A:  Bootine

 
 
burt
 
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burt
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09 October 2018 20:53
 

How Canada got its name.

After becoming a country there was a question of what to call it. After some debate with no conclusions, the people responsible for coming up with a name for this new country decided that to be democratic they ought to let the decision be made by ordinary citizens. They went out on the street and collected three guys who just happened to be walking along, put them into a room, and told them to come up with a name for the country. The three guys (Jack, Morrie, and Frank) talked around for a bit and then decided that it would be a good idea to spell it out one letter at a time. “Well, how about a C, eh?” said Jack. “Cool,” said Morrie, “and then how about an N, eh?” Not to be outdone, Frank chimed in “Yes, and finish with a D, eh?” And that’s how we got CANADA.

 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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10 October 2018 06:26
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 05:14 PM
nonverbal - 09 October 2018 04:57 PM
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 04:40 PM

One smart frakin’ mouse—an anecdote. 

We live in the woods, so we get mice in the house.  No matter what we do, they get in.  So naturally we try to catch them, but being humane lovers of all things great and small, we use Mouse Cubes, a live trap with a slopping door that the mouse crawls under to get to the food, so it falls back down behind it, sealing it in.  It’s a clever little device that helps us get rid of the mice and preserve our consciences as well (those mice, after all, are just trying to make a living like anyone else).

Well, as clever as that trap is, there is a clever mouse.  One time last week I checked the trap, only to find it turned over on its side and the bait gone.  The door would swing sideways this way, preventing it from slamming down behind the mouse.  I told myself I must have set it wrong, suspicious though I was that I hadn’t.  So I resent the trap.

Last night while watching TV, I heard the trap moving in the kitchen (the little stinkers love the kitchen).  I got up and found the trap on its side, but with the bait still in it.  Mousus interuptus.  So my wife had an idea.  We wedged the trap between a cooler we’d left out and the cabinet baseboard, this way the mouse couldn’t turn it over.  TV watching resumed.

Not five minutes later we heard the trap moving again.  This time the stinker had pulled the trap out from between the cooler and the cabinet, then turned it over, but we got there before he could get the bait.  So we reset it, this time wedging it in and taping it to the floor.  TV watching resumed

Bingo.  Quite a while later, after I’d gone to bed, my wife heard the door clank down and sure enough, she checked the trap and there was the mouse.  Apparently mouse rationality only goes so far, with its instinct for food overriding its avoidance of a trap, if there is no foreseeable way to avoid it.  Call it a delayed or frustrated gratification problem, not a problem of mouse cleverness.  In any case, I took the mouse out and drove it down to the grassy right-of-way the power lines run through in order to release it.  A mouse that clever surely deserves to go free.

In retrospect I almost wish I’d kept the thing ‘til morning, then gone out and bought an aquarium to keep it as a pet.  But on a second thought a mouse that clever deserves to be free, to make it on its own in the world through its own resourcefulness, in the wild where it belongs.  But damn, that was one smart mouse.  Nothing but respect for the little stinker, as annoying as they are.

Smart, no doubt. But did the mouse actually understand the trap?

It’s behavior suggests it did, at least in causal terms of falling objects and barrier to ‘escape’.  For instance, it turned it over on its side to offset the dropping shut of the door.  It did this twice.  When faced with the actuality of not being able to turn it on its side, it re-situated the trap so it could turn it over, then turned it, again, deactivating the door that would prevent ‘escape’.  Where it seems to have been foiled, then, is not in understanding the trap but in being able to use this understanding to overcome the the more fundamental drive to eat.  When there was not a way it could deactivate the trap, it went in for the food, presumably because despite its knowledge of ‘how the trap’ worked, it was hungry.  Did it have a concept of “trap”.  Of course not.  But did it have an appreciation of the causality of the door and its prevention of ‘escape’—clearly.  It’s just, I think, that unlike humans it cannot use this kind of ‘knowledge’ to override the more fundamental instinct to eat present food.  It can delay and avoid to some degree, but when faced with the consequence of not delaying and avoiding versus not actually eating, eating wins out, regardless of what it “knows.”

That’s one Anus’ theory, in any case, and I’m sticking to it!  Vive le mouse.

I’ve noticed that mice these days seem far more skilled at eating bait gently (and surviving), compared with how they used to be. If in fact it is a trend, several hypotheses come to mind, especially with regard to descent-with-modification, or perhaps even nonverbal communication analogous to the spreading of a verbal-human meme. I think this apparent trend deserves being formally studied, looking to find possible causes.

I wonder if it’s okay to be analytical in this thread.

 
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
 
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TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
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10 October 2018 08:04
 
nonverbal - 10 October 2018 06:26 AM
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 05:14 PM
nonverbal - 09 October 2018 04:57 PM
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 04:40 PM

One smart frakin’ mouse—an anecdote. 

We live in the woods, so we get mice in the house.  No matter what we do, they get in.  So naturally we try to catch them, but being humane lovers of all things great and small, we use Mouse Cubes, a live trap with a slopping door that the mouse crawls under to get to the food, so it falls back down behind it, sealing it in.  It’s a clever little device that helps us get rid of the mice and preserve our consciences as well (those mice, after all, are just trying to make a living like anyone else).

Well, as clever as that trap is, there is a clever mouse.  One time last week I checked the trap, only to find it turned over on its side and the bait gone.  The door would swing sideways this way, preventing it from slamming down behind the mouse.  I told myself I must have set it wrong, suspicious though I was that I hadn’t.  So I resent the trap.

Last night while watching TV, I heard the trap moving in the kitchen (the little stinkers love the kitchen).  I got up and found the trap on its side, but with the bait still in it.  Mousus interuptus.  So my wife had an idea.  We wedged the trap between a cooler we’d left out and the cabinet baseboard, this way the mouse couldn’t turn it over.  TV watching resumed.

Not five minutes later we heard the trap moving again.  This time the stinker had pulled the trap out from between the cooler and the cabinet, then turned it over, but we got there before he could get the bait.  So we reset it, this time wedging it in and taping it to the floor.  TV watching resumed

Bingo.  Quite a while later, after I’d gone to bed, my wife heard the door clank down and sure enough, she checked the trap and there was the mouse.  Apparently mouse rationality only goes so far, with its instinct for food overriding its avoidance of a trap, if there is no foreseeable way to avoid it.  Call it a delayed or frustrated gratification problem, not a problem of mouse cleverness.  In any case, I took the mouse out and drove it down to the grassy right-of-way the power lines run through in order to release it.  A mouse that clever surely deserves to go free.

In retrospect I almost wish I’d kept the thing ‘til morning, then gone out and bought an aquarium to keep it as a pet.  But on a second thought a mouse that clever deserves to be free, to make it on its own in the world through its own resourcefulness, in the wild where it belongs.  But damn, that was one smart mouse.  Nothing but respect for the little stinker, as annoying as they are.

Smart, no doubt. But did the mouse actually understand the trap?

It’s behavior suggests it did, at least in causal terms of falling objects and barrier to ‘escape’.  For instance, it turned it over on its side to offset the dropping shut of the door.  It did this twice.  When faced with the actuality of not being able to turn it on its side, it re-situated the trap so it could turn it over, then turned it, again, deactivating the door that would prevent ‘escape’.  Where it seems to have been foiled, then, is not in understanding the trap but in being able to use this understanding to overcome the the more fundamental drive to eat.  When there was not a way it could deactivate the trap, it went in for the food, presumably because despite its knowledge of ‘how the trap’ worked, it was hungry.  Did it have a concept of “trap”.  Of course not.  But did it have an appreciation of the causality of the door and its prevention of ‘escape’—clearly.  It’s just, I think, that unlike humans it cannot use this kind of ‘knowledge’ to override the more fundamental instinct to eat present food.  It can delay and avoid to some degree, but when faced with the consequence of not delaying and avoiding versus not actually eating, eating wins out, regardless of what it “knows.”

That’s one Anus’ theory, in any case, and I’m sticking to it!  Vive le mouse.

I’ve noticed that mice these days seem far more skilled at eating bait gently (and surviving), compared with how they used to be. If in fact it is a trend, several hypotheses come to mind, especially with regard to descent-with-modification, or perhaps even nonverbal communication analogous to the spreading of a verbal-human meme. I think this apparent trend deserves being formally studied, looking to find possible causes.

I wonder if it’s okay to be analytical in this thread.

Let’s not be.  I too came here for the break.

 
brazen4
 
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brazen4
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10 October 2018 10:25
 

It’s the traps that suck. they are inconsistent re being “hair triggered”.  I’ve done minor alterations that have “helped” but no sure thing. It may very well be that the little dudes are getting better at “eating carefully” but no one has been able to get research funding to find out for sure. I know I’m not the sharpest arrow in the quiver but I’m not dull either. However nothing makes me feel developmentally challenged more than knowing that I haven’t been able to keep a rodent free house. That said, this battle isn’t over.

 
burt
 
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burt
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10 October 2018 10:36
 

May fit here. Babylon 5, one of the all time great SF shows.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrM5SE8zksI

 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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10 October 2018 10:47
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 10 October 2018 08:04 AM
nonverbal - 10 October 2018 06:26 AM
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 05:14 PM
nonverbal - 09 October 2018 04:57 PM
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 09 October 2018 04:40 PM

One smart frakin’ mouse—an anecdote. 

We live in the woods, so we get mice in the house.  No matter what we do, they get in.  So naturally we try to catch them, but being humane lovers of all things great and small, we use Mouse Cubes, a live trap with a slopping door that the mouse crawls under to get to the food, so it falls back down behind it, sealing it in.  It’s a clever little device that helps us get rid of the mice and preserve our consciences as well (those mice, after all, are just trying to make a living like anyone else).

Well, as clever as that trap is, there is a clever mouse.  One time last week I checked the trap, only to find it turned over on its side and the bait gone.  The door would swing sideways this way, preventing it from slamming down behind the mouse.  I told myself I must have set it wrong, suspicious though I was that I hadn’t.  So I resent the trap.

Last night while watching TV, I heard the trap moving in the kitchen (the little stinkers love the kitchen).  I got up and found the trap on its side, but with the bait still in it.  Mousus interuptus.  So my wife had an idea.  We wedged the trap between a cooler we’d left out and the cabinet baseboard, this way the mouse couldn’t turn it over.  TV watching resumed.

Not five minutes later we heard the trap moving again.  This time the stinker had pulled the trap out from between the cooler and the cabinet, then turned it over, but we got there before he could get the bait.  So we reset it, this time wedging it in and taping it to the floor.  TV watching resumed

Bingo.  Quite a while later, after I’d gone to bed, my wife heard the door clank down and sure enough, she checked the trap and there was the mouse.  Apparently mouse rationality only goes so far, with its instinct for food overriding its avoidance of a trap, if there is no foreseeable way to avoid it.  Call it a delayed or frustrated gratification problem, not a problem of mouse cleverness.  In any case, I took the mouse out and drove it down to the grassy right-of-way the power lines run through in order to release it.  A mouse that clever surely deserves to go free.

In retrospect I almost wish I’d kept the thing ‘til morning, then gone out and bought an aquarium to keep it as a pet.  But on a second thought a mouse that clever deserves to be free, to make it on its own in the world through its own resourcefulness, in the wild where it belongs.  But damn, that was one smart mouse.  Nothing but respect for the little stinker, as annoying as they are.

Smart, no doubt. But did the mouse actually understand the trap?

It’s behavior suggests it did, at least in causal terms of falling objects and barrier to ‘escape’.  For instance, it turned it over on its side to offset the dropping shut of the door.  It did this twice.  When faced with the actuality of not being able to turn it on its side, it re-situated the trap so it could turn it over, then turned it, again, deactivating the door that would prevent ‘escape’.  Where it seems to have been foiled, then, is not in understanding the trap but in being able to use this understanding to overcome the the more fundamental drive to eat.  When there was not a way it could deactivate the trap, it went in for the food, presumably because despite its knowledge of ‘how the trap’ worked, it was hungry.  Did it have a concept of “trap”.  Of course not.  But did it have an appreciation of the causality of the door and its prevention of ‘escape’—clearly.  It’s just, I think, that unlike humans it cannot use this kind of ‘knowledge’ to override the more fundamental instinct to eat present food.  It can delay and avoid to some degree, but when faced with the consequence of not delaying and avoiding versus not actually eating, eating wins out, regardless of what it “knows.”

That’s one Anus’ theory, in any case, and I’m sticking to it!  Vive le mouse.

I’ve noticed that mice these days seem far more skilled at eating bait gently (and surviving), compared with how they used to be. If in fact it is a trend, several hypotheses come to mind, especially with regard to descent-with-modification, or perhaps even nonverbal communication analogous to the spreading of a verbal-human meme. I think this apparent trend deserves being formally studied, looking to find possible causes.

I wonder if it’s okay to be analytical in this thread.

Let’s not be.  I too came here for the break.

I understand. Let’s leave it to the professionals—the exterminators. I’ll bet some of their behind-the-scenes people even have Ph.D.s, though not necessarily in cognitive psychology.

 

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
Total Posts:  3301
Joined  21-10-2016
 
 
 
10 October 2018 10:55
 
burt - 10 October 2018 10:36 AM

May fit here. Babylon 5, one of the all time great SF shows.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrM5SE8zksI

Nice.  The best SF often inspires hope for a bright future.

 
 
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