Arabic Cultural Traits and Islam

 
burt
 
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burt
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16 November 2018 09:23
 

Very interesting study. Google Peter A. Naffsinger and download the pdf file of his analysis of Arab (and Muslim) psychology.

 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
 
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TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
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16 November 2018 13:44
 

Are you talking about the CIA brief, “Face among the Arabs”?  Nothing obvious about psychology came up.

 
burt
 
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16 November 2018 21:25
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 16 November 2018 01:44 PM

Are you talking about the CIA brief, “Face among the Arabs”?  Nothing obvious about psychology came up.

Yes, that’s the one.

 
icehorse
 
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18 November 2018 08:59
 
burt - 16 November 2018 09:23 AM

Very interesting study. Google Peter A. Naffsinger and download the pdf file of his analysis of Arab (and Muslim) psychology.

Can you give us a one paragraph summary?

 
 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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18 November 2018 10:34
 
burt - 16 November 2018 09:23 AM

Very interesting study. Google Peter A. Naffsinger and download the pdf file of his analysis of Arab (and Muslim) psychology.

It’s an urgently important psychological issue when large groups of people adopt a religiously-inspired system of moral understanding while simultaneously setting out to actively ignore their valid moral urges. Such an approach is as dubious with Islam as it is with Christianity or any other faith, with nasty—sometimes violent—results, but the nonviolent results are at least as harmful to families and individuals. Specifically, religious fervor bends back some of our naturally moral ways of thinking and seeing, constraining them into dark recesses headed up by prejudice. For instance, if you pray for a solution to a problem, the most violent solutions might seem—and actually be—the most effective way to achieve a goal. Universally valid kinds of moral thought get left behind.

 
icehorse
 
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18 November 2018 10:37
 
nonverbal - 18 November 2018 10:34 AM
burt - 16 November 2018 09:23 AM

Very interesting study. Google Peter A. Naffsinger and download the pdf file of his analysis of Arab (and Muslim) psychology.

It’s an urgently important psychological issue when large groups of people adopt a religiously-inspired system of moral understanding while simultaneously setting out to actively ignore their valid moral urges. Such an approach is as dubious with Islam as it is with Christianity or any other faith, with nasty—sometimes violent—results, but the nonviolent results are at least as harmful to families and individuals. Specifically, religious fervor bends back some of our naturally moral ways of thinking and seeing, constraining them into dark recesses headed up by prejudice. For instance, if you pray for a solution to a problem, the most violent solutions might seem—and actually be—the most effective way to achieve a goal. Universally valid kinds of moral thought get left behind.

thanks for the summary.

 
 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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18 November 2018 10:45
 
icehorse - 18 November 2018 10:37 AM
nonverbal - 18 November 2018 10:34 AM
burt - 16 November 2018 09:23 AM

Very interesting study. Google Peter A. Naffsinger and download the pdf file of his analysis of Arab (and Muslim) psychology.

It’s an urgently important psychological issue when large groups of people adopt a religiously-inspired system of moral understanding while simultaneously setting out to actively ignore their valid moral urges. Such an approach is as dubious with Islam as it is with Christianity or any other faith, with nasty—sometimes violent—results, but the nonviolent results are at least as harmful to families and individuals. Specifically, religious fervor bends back some of our naturally moral ways of thinking and seeing, constraining them into dark recesses headed up by prejudice. For instance, if you pray for a solution to a problem, the most violent solutions might seem—and actually be—the most effective way to achieve a goal. Universally valid kinds of moral thought get left behind.

thanks for the summary.

It was only my little, admittedly prejudiced, take on the article’s significance. I’m guessing Burt will comment on your request.

 
burt
 
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18 November 2018 16:24
 
icehorse - 18 November 2018 08:59 AM
burt - 16 November 2018 09:23 AM

Very interesting study. Google Peter A. Naffsinger and download the pdf file of his analysis of Arab (and Muslim) psychology.

Can you give us a one paragraph summary?

No, it was an in depth analysis and while it has some Eurocentric attitudes it’s pretty good. One sentence summary, learn how a shame culture differs from a guilt culture in terms of their attitude toward objective truth.

 
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18 November 2018 16:39
 

I’m reading some of the stories from 1001 Arabian Nights now.  Shame culture is evident.  But cool stories.

I also learned that Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves was not in the original 1001.  May have been made up by a French translator - possibly the reason a woman is the true heroine of the story.

 
burt
 
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18 November 2018 19:22
 
EN - 18 November 2018 04:39 PM

I’m reading some of the stories from 1001 Arabian Nights now.  Shame culture is evident.  But cool stories.

I also learned that Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves was not in the original 1001.  May have been made up by a French translator - possibly the reason a woman is the true heroine of the story.

I understand that the original Arabic title translates something like “Mother of Stories.”

 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
 
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19 November 2018 16:57
 

I’m pretty sure the honor culture among the Arabs preceded the rise and spread of Islam, and Islam in practice had a moderating effect on the perpetual inter-tribal conflict honor culture created, uniting, in effect, the divided Arabs for the first time under one sense of a common identity—member of the Muslim Caliphate.  Honor culture still prevailed—as it still does—but not because of adapting Islam, i.e. because of religious values prevailing over valid moral instincts.

[ Edited: 19 November 2018 17:00 by TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher]
 
burt
 
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19 November 2018 19:36
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher - 19 November 2018 04:57 PM

I’m pretty sure the honor culture among the Arabs preceded the rise and spread of Islam, and Islam in practice had a moderating effect on the perpetual inter-tribal conflict honor culture created, uniting, in effect, the divided Arabs for the first time under one sense of a common identity—member of the Muslim Caliphate.  Honor culture still prevailed—as it still does—but not because of adapting Islam, i.e. because of religious values prevailing over valid moral instincts.

Somewhere I think I posted an article discussing how the complex tribal system functions.