Reread an Old Favorite

 
burt
 
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burt
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30 January 2019 11:50
 

With flights in my future I was motivated to buy a copy of a book I read and enjoyed last in 1969: Roger Zelazny, Lord of Light. Being years older an wiser now I enjoyed it even more. A flavor, from the beginning, pp.2-3: “It was in the days of the rains that their prayers went up, not from the fingering of knotted prayer cords or the spinning of prayer wheels, but from the great prey-machine in the monastery of Ratri, goddess of the Night. The high-frequency prayers were directed upward through the atmosphere and out beyond it…. He tended the pray-machine and the giant metal lotus he has set atop the monastery roof turned and turned in its sockets. ...For six days he had offered many kilowatts of prayer, but the static kept him from being heard On High. Under his breath, he called upon the more notable of the current fertility deities, invoking them in terms of their most prominent Attributes. A rumble of thunder answered his petition, and the small ape who assisted him chuckled. “Your prayers and your curses come to the same, Lord Yama,” commented the ape. “That is to say, nothing.” “It has taken you seventeen incarnations to arrive at this truth?” said Yama. “I can see then why you are still doing time as an ape.”

 
Cheshire Cat
 
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Cheshire Cat
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30 January 2019 18:25
 

Yes, it can be fun revisiting books that one first read as a teenager. It can also be disappointing if the story isn’t the way you remember, or, to put it another way, you’ve outgrown it.
My favorite sci-fi story of all time is Childhood’s End by Arthur C. Clarke. I’ve reread it a few times over the years and it still holds up, even though it was written in 1953.
There was a SyFy Channel three-part series made of it few years ago, of which I only saw one part. It was very disappointing. Don’t judge the book by the series. I had always hoped that a director of the caliber of a Ridley Scott or Speilberg would take on Childhood’s End and bring it to the big screen. Not to be, apparently. The story has a strange and disturbing ending which may be why no movie studio has ever touched it. But it’s the ending which makes the book so memorable. That, and the physical appearance of the alien race race that comes to earth, the Overlords.

 
 
burt
 
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burt
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30 January 2019 19:11
 
Cheshire Cat - 30 January 2019 06:25 PM

Yes, it can be fun revisiting books that one first read as a teenager. It can also be disappointing if the story isn’t the way you remember, or, to put it another way, you’ve outgrown it.
My favorite sci-fi story of all time is Childhood’s End by Arthur C. Clarke. I’ve reread it a few times over the years and it still holds up, even though it was written in 1953.
There was a SyFy Channel three-part series made of it few years ago, of which I only saw one part. It was very disappointing. Don’t judge the book by the series. I had always hoped that a director of the caliber of a Ridley Scott or Speilberg would take on Childhood’s End and bring it to the big screen. Not to be, apparently. The story has a strange and disturbing ending which may be why no movie studio has ever touched it. But it’s the ending which makes the book so memorable. That, and the physical appearance of the alien race race that comes to earth, the Overlords.

Watched that series and was somewhat disappointed. Agree it would be great as on full screen.

 
Jefe
 
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Jefe
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30 January 2019 19:22
 

I love old Zalazny novels.  I’d love to find a digital copy of the Complete Amber Chronicles.

Currently reading, and loving, the Reality Disfunction by Peter. F. Hamilton.

 
 
burt
 
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burt
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30 January 2019 19:51
 
Jefe - 30 January 2019 07:22 PM

I love old Zalazny novels.  I’d love to find a digital copy of the Complete Amber Chronicles.

Currently reading, and loving, the Reality Disfunction by Peter. F. Hamilton.

Occasionally I’ve seen a large book of the complete Amber novels in book stores.

 
hannahtoo
 
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hannahtoo
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31 January 2019 08:18
 

I know this sounds odd, perhaps, but the book I’ve reread the most is Wrinkle in Time.  I read it in elementary school, and it blew me away.  It opened my mind to the wonder of books.  I read it as an adult, when I was working as a teacher’s aide, and it was assigned to my students’ reading group.  I ended up reading it several times in that job.  What a treat to introduce that book to 5th graders!  I’ll never forget one Christian girl who was put off at first because she thought Mrs. Which was a witch, and she wasn’t supposed to read about the occult.  I told her, “No, just wait, she’s definitely not a witch, but something amazing!”  The girl ended up loving the book and went on to read other L’Engle stories. 

Sadly, the 2018 movie version was terrible.  Perhaps impossible to put this story on the screen in any case.  The best children’s fantasy book I’ve seen as a movie was Neverending Story.  “Atreyu!”

 
Jefe
 
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07 February 2019 11:48
 
hannahtoo - 31 January 2019 08:18 AM

Sadly, the 2018 movie version was terrible.

Depending on the order of consumption, I feel that often the movies don’t live up to our own imaginations from written works all that often.  There are exceptions, of course.  But I think sometimes leaving the readers’ imaginations to do some of the lifting is where excellent authors shine.  Add to that the ‘limitations’ of cinematography and we sometimes get a failure to translate from the written work to the visual screen.

For me, the movie “Ready, Player One” was a great example of this.  Even though the movie didn’t strictly follow the plot in the book, I felt the translation was not as sound on-screen as in the book.
It seems to me that for that book, the author forced the reader to focus on the pop culture references as he was writing them.  In the movie, there were plenty of references, but the director couldn’t control the attention of the movie-watcher the way the author of a book can.  There were some peripheral references that were harder to catch if one was engaged in the spotlight action of the movie, and so some of those may have slipped by unnoticed, or lost in the background, where as in the book we are forced to read each line the author writes, and so the author has much more control over what parts of the story are prioritized for us.

 
 
hannahtoo
 
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hannahtoo
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07 February 2019 13:13
 
Jefe - 07 February 2019 11:48 AM
hannahtoo - 31 January 2019 08:18 AM

Sadly, the 2018 movie version was terrible.

Depending on the order of consumption, I feel that often the movies don’t live up to our own imaginations from written works all that often.  There are exceptions, of course.  But I think sometimes leaving the readers’ imaginations to do some of the lifting is where excellent authors shine.  Add to that the ‘limitations’ of cinematography and we sometimes get a failure to translate from the written work to the visual screen.

For me, the movie “Ready, Player One” was a great example of this.  Even though the movie didn’t strictly follow the plot in the book, I felt the translation was not as sound on-screen as in the book.
It seems to me that for that book, the author forced the reader to focus on the pop culture references as he was writing them.  In the movie, there were plenty of references, but the director couldn’t control the attention of the movie-watcher the way the author of a book can.  There were some peripheral references that were harder to catch if one was engaged in the spotlight action of the movie, and so some of those may have slipped by unnoticed, or lost in the background, where as in the book we are forced to read each line the author writes, and so the author has much more control over what parts of the story are prioritized for us.

I’ve only seen the movie, which was fun…so now maybe I should read the book.