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Russia

 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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11 February 2019 11:53
 
Cheshire Cat - 11 February 2019 12:23 AM
burt - 10 February 2019 06:33 PM

I started on Crime & Punishment back in the mid-70s when I was living in the basement apartment with an elderly lady living in the house above. I stopped reading early on.

I guess this proves what a music geek I must be. Or, maybe just a geek.

This is the only song I know that references Raskolnikov or any other reference to Dostoevsky. It’s a song by the band Magazine named “Philadelphia,” recorded in 1980.

Everything’d be just fine
If I had the right pastime
I’d've been Raskolnikov
But Mother Nature ripped me off

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnAoBtZScIE

I’ve never read Dostoevsky. I started the “The Brothers Karamazov,” but never got through it. I admire EN for sticking with W + P.

Was Captain Kirk one of the brothers?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbIWfH46PeA  (Remember when trailers had scenes longer than 1 second so you could tell what was happening and what planet you were on?)

Thank God Dostoevsky never saw the Matrix.  Another thing, I don’t think Melville would have liked Gregory Peck as Ahab.  This is more like it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_4ObISXQsw

[ Edited: 11 February 2019 11:59 by unsmoked]
 
 
Cheshire Cat
 
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Cheshire Cat
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12 February 2019 00:06
 

Yep. That was William Shatner, alright.

There was another actor in that Brothers Karamazov trailer, named Albert Salmi, whom I remember seeing on television quite a lot when I was a kid. I looked on Wikipedia to see what became of him. In the pit of depression, he shot his wife and himself in 1990. A sad ending for one so talented. Perhaps it was an ending Dostoevsky could have anticipated?

I met William Shatner once, by the way. Oddly enough, it was at a rustic, tent-cabin resort named Bear Paw, ten miles deep inside the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Shatner rode in on a mule. Most people hike in. The whole camp was excited by his presence.

Some friends and I had been backpacking higher up in a fairly isolated location named 9 Lakes Basin. At the end of our trip we stayed a couple of nights in Bear Paw before hiking out. We were sitting around a camp fire when Shatner appeared, drink in hand. He was friendly. We didn’t let on that we knew who he was. We told him about an encounter we had had with a pregnant black bear who managed to eat a good portion of our food one morning just before dawn. I was the first to awaken and saw her only about ten feet away, her snout buried inside a food sack. My friends and I chased her away, yelling and banging pots together.

She was such a clever and determined bear, that she circled around our camp 180 degrees, and came back later that afternoon. She must have covered a lot of territory to do that. Three of us, including myself, had left for a day hike, but one stayed back in camp. Good thing too. She would have finished off the rest of our food if my friend hadn’t been there on guard.

That was the story we told Shatner. He seemed amused, wished us a good night and departed.

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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12 February 2019 05:34
 
Cheshire Cat - 11 February 2019 12:23 AM

I’ve never read Dostoevsky. I started the “The Brothers Karamazov,” but never got through it. I admire EN for sticking with W + P.

It’s a bit daunting when you’ve read over 400 pages and realize you still have over 1000 to go.

 
hannahtoo
 
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hannahtoo
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12 February 2019 06:18
 

I think Russians had a lot more undistracted time to read, back in 1867.  Particularly during the winters.

 
unsmoked
 
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12 February 2019 13:04
 
hannahtoo - 12 February 2019 06:18 AM

I think Russians had a lot more undistracted time to read, back in 1867.  Particularly during the winters.

For 300 years only one book in the house?  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gutenberg_Bible  How many could read it?

Pope Innocent III stated in 1199:

“... to be reproved are those who translate into French the Gospels, the letters of Paul, the psalter, etc. They are moved by a certain love of Scripture in order to explain them clandestinely and to preach them to one another. The mysteries of the faith are not to explained rashly to anyone. Usually in fact, they cannot be understood by everyone but only by those who are qualified to understand them with informed intelligence. The depth of the divine Scriptures is such that not only the illiterate and uninitiated have difficulty understanding them, but also the educated and the gifted.”

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_James_Version

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Tyndale

(When trekking for weeks in the wilderness, if you haven’t brought a book, you find yourself at the campfire reading scraps of newspaper you brought along for kindling.)

Suppose we’ve had brains like these for 250,000 years and for 245,000 of those years we never read a single word.  Except, maybe a charcoal mark on a birch tree that looked like a turtle and we knew who had been there. 

[ Edited: 12 February 2019 14:54 by unsmoked]
 
 
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12 February 2019 15:14
 
unsmoked - 12 February 2019 01:04 PM

Suppose we’ve had brains like these for 250,000 years and for 245,000 of those years we never read a single word.  Except, maybe a charcoal mark on a birch tree that looked like a turtle and we knew who had been there.

Which is one of the great mysteries of human life.  We have all this latent talent that has yet to be explored because the means have not yet been invented. We could play chess, do math, read, play music, design buildings, long before the means existed to do these things. Where did that latent talent come from, and how did it develop, without necessity or means of expression?

 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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13 February 2019 11:53
 
EN - 12 February 2019 03:14 PM
unsmoked - 12 February 2019 01:04 PM

Suppose we’ve had brains like these for 250,000 years and for 245,000 of those years we never read a single word.  Except, maybe a charcoal mark on a birch tree that looked like a turtle and we knew who had been there.

Which is one of the great mysteries of human life.  We have all this latent talent that has yet to be explored because the means have not yet been invented. We could play chess, do math, read, play music, design buildings, long before the means existed to do these things. Where did that latent talent come from, and how did it develop, without necessity or means of expression?

A charcoal mark on a birch tree that looked like a turtle, and we knew who had been there.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=knbNwQog4Ro

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rW5D6siXUmc  (sound on for music)

 
 
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