Have we won the war on terror as Trump implies?

 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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11 February 2019 10:43
 

Since 9/11/01 more than 31,000 Afghan civilians have been killed in the U.S. war against terror, and more than 29,000 wounded.  In Iraq, the figures for civilian casualties are much, much worse.  As we speak, a Q-9A Reaper (a grim reaper?) is likely hovering over a compound in Afghanistan or Pakistan with a U.S. operator thousands of miles away - adjusting the crosshairs, finger on the button - 18 people below seconds away from their death.  Trustworthy intelligence?  We know who they are?  One last little prompt  with AGM-114 Hellfire missiles to bring them to the negotiating table?

That wraps it up then?  We’ve won the war against terror?  Mission accomplished?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civilian_casualties_in_the_war_in_Afghanistan_(2001–present)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casualties_of_the_Iraq_War

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/america-at-war-introduction-180971014/

From the January/February Smithsonian Magazine - “After 17 years, our longest armed conflict overseas now spans 80 countries.”

The Global War on Terrorism, declared in 2001, surely counts, but it has barreled onward through a fog of its own, a series of vagaries concerning territory, scale, foes and metrics for success. Exactly when the war in Afghanistan surpassed the Vietnam War as America’s longest overseas war is debated—the comparison depends on which benchmarks you use. Last September, however, the United States reached an indicator that clears away at least some of the confusion: The first cohort of Americans who were born after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, became old enough to enlist in the war that followed. Whatever else it is, the Global War on Terrorism is now a second-generation war.

With that in mind, this double issue of Smithsonian brings into focus who is fighting this war, and why, and where, and even what they’ve left behind. These men and women make up a tiny fraction of the U.S. population, and 17 years is a long time. But our awareness of this conflict shouldn’t become so normal that, to borrow one general’s valediction, it fades away.

 

 

 
 
DEGENERATEON
 
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DEGENERATEON
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11 February 2019 17:45
 

Can the US fly drones over Pakistan?  I figured that would lead to some conflict the US didn’t want.  I always thought the Bin Laden raid was only “allowed” because what could Pakistan say after harboring him?

Don’t think a war on terror can be won, but you can’t allow it to thrive unchallenged.

 
Twissel
 
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Twissel
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12 February 2019 02:08
 
DEGENERATEON - 11 February 2019 05:45 PM

Can the US fly drones over Pakistan?  I figured that would lead to some conflict the US didn’t want.  I always thought the Bin Laden raid was only “allowed” because what could Pakistan say after harboring him?

Don’t think a war on terror can be won, but you can’t allow it to thrive unchallenged.

they are, since Pakistan is entirely dependent on US aid.
But they do have to coordinate with the local military.