Billionaires pledge to fund rebuilding of Notre Dame Cathedral

 
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16 April 2019 08:55
 

https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/16/business/francois-henri-pinault-bernard-arnault-notre-dame-donation/index.html

$450,000,000 pledged so far.  Most of the artwork was saved, and the stone structure is apparently intact.  Hope next time around they make it fireproof.  It will be a semi-replica, but at least it won’t be a burned out hull.

 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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16 April 2019 09:23
 

It appears that was primarily feeding the fire was the oak roof and that the damage to the main structure isn’t as extensive as first feared.  This may mean that it can be restored to its original design, although using some modern methods.  Perhaps they can use some type of fire-retardant on the wood for the new roof?  There may be some loss of irreplaceable art, but it’s been initially reported that the bells and the organ may still be intact; unclear yet about some of the stained glass.

I was somewhat amused on the reports that the crown of thorns relic was saved.  Do people still really believe that this is the actual crown of thorns?

I agree with Brazen4 who said on another thread that “I love history, especially in architecture and I don’t especially care what inspired it”.  Like so many people, I would very much like to see this beautiful and historic building restored to its original glory.  I think it preferable that billionaires pay this high cost rather than taxpayer funds; hopefully their money doesn’t come with self-interested conditions or desire for control.

 
 
proximacentauri
 
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proximacentauri
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16 April 2019 10:08
 

What about the Holy Prepuce? Guess Notre Dame is not one of the dozen or so churches in Europe claiming they have Jesus’s foreskin.

Regarding the preservation of the historical Architecture, I hope it can be restored as close as possible to the original as well.

 
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nonverbal
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16 April 2019 10:26
 

I hope the torture devices were saved. Never know when they’ll be needed again by Church authority!

 
 
Nhoj Morley
 
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Nhoj Morley
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17 April 2019 02:47
 

Did anyone else picture the french guy from Raiders of the Lost Ark saying, “this is history”?

Of course they’re not going to leave it like that, but slow down. A five year rush will get us an all-PVC cathedral that won’t need buttresses. Stain glass will become LCD’s.

They should give this some thought. That spire wasn’t 800 years old. The place got pimped out over the centuries. Do some archaeology first. The foundation has to be sorted out anyway. What about taking it back to its earliest incarnation?

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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17 April 2019 06:44
 

My initial reaction was that Notre Dame should be restored due to appreciation of history and the architectural skill and craftsmanship that created this cathedral.  But other thoughts and questions have come to mind.

Almost instantly following the fire, many millions of dollars have been pledged to save this building, yet this does not happen to this extent when there are major catastrophes that threaten human lives.  Current architectural skills and resources might be put to better use building structures for our present and future needs (e.g. dams and levees).

Medieval buildings such as this one cost exorbitant amounts of money to maintain, let alone repair and restore.  At what point should it be accepted that, as old as they are, nothing is permanent, and that as sad as it might be, there may come a time to let them crumble?

 
 
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17 April 2019 07:51
 
Jan_CAN - 17 April 2019 06:44 AM

My initial reaction was that Notre Dame should be restored due to appreciation of history and the architectural skill and craftsmanship that created this cathedral.  But other thoughts and questions have come to mind.

Almost instantly following the fire, many millions of dollars have been pledged to save this building, yet this does not happen to this extent when there are major catastrophes that threaten human lives.  Current architectural skills and resources might be put to better use building structures for our present and future needs (e.g. dams and levees).

Medieval buildings such as this one cost exorbitant amounts of money to maintain, let alone repair and restore.  At what point should it be accepted that, as old as they are, nothing is permanent, and that as sad as it might be, there may come a time to let them crumble?

What French politician wants to be the one who says that it’s time for Notre Dame to crumble?  Not going to happen.  Anyway, it’s going to put a lot of workers to work, so it will be good for their economy.

 
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17 April 2019 08:21
 
EN - 17 April 2019 07:51 AM
Jan_CAN - 17 April 2019 06:44 AM

My initial reaction was that Notre Dame should be restored due to appreciation of history and the architectural skill and craftsmanship that created this cathedral.  But other thoughts and questions have come to mind.

Almost instantly following the fire, many millions of dollars have been pledged to save this building, yet this does not happen to this extent when there are major catastrophes that threaten human lives.  Current architectural skills and resources might be put to better use building structures for our present and future needs (e.g. dams and levees).

Medieval buildings such as this one cost exorbitant amounts of money to maintain, let alone repair and restore.  At what point should it be accepted that, as old as they are, nothing is permanent, and that as sad as it might be, there may come a time to let them crumble?

What French politician wants to be the one who says that it’s time for Notre Dame to crumble?  Not going to happen.  Anyway, it’s going to put a lot of workers to work, so it will be good for their economy.

Very true – it’s not that time for Notre Dame, certainly not according to public opinion, and I don’t really disagree.  I was just thinking about the billions of dollars spent on maintaining and repairing the many historical buildings, with the costs increasing over the years, and wondering how much longer it can continue for some of these.

 
 
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17 April 2019 10:15
 
Jan_CAN - 17 April 2019 08:21 AM
EN - 17 April 2019 07:51 AM
Jan_CAN - 17 April 2019 06:44 AM

My initial reaction was that Notre Dame should be restored due to appreciation of history and the architectural skill and craftsmanship that created this cathedral.  But other thoughts and questions have come to mind.

Almost instantly following the fire, many millions of dollars have been pledged to save this building, yet this does not happen to this extent when there are major catastrophes that threaten human lives.  Current architectural skills and resources might be put to better use building structures for our present and future needs (e.g. dams and levees).

Medieval buildings such as this one cost exorbitant amounts of money to maintain, let alone repair and restore.  At what point should it be accepted that, as old as they are, nothing is permanent, and that as sad as it might be, there may come a time to let them crumble?

What French politician wants to be the one who says that it’s time for Notre Dame to crumble?  Not going to happen.  Anyway, it’s going to put a lot of workers to work, so it will be good for their economy.

Very true – it’s not that time for Notre Dame, certainly not according to public opinion, and I don’t really disagree.  I was just thinking about the billions of dollars spent on maintaining and repairing the many historical buildings, with the costs increasing over the years, and wondering how much longer it can continue for some of these.

Yes, there is a limit.  Apparently Trump thinks it’s OK for Puerto Rico to crumble, for example.

 
Jefe
 
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18 April 2019 07:56
 
EN - 17 April 2019 10:15 AM
Jan_CAN - 17 April 2019 08:21 AM
EN - 17 April 2019 07:51 AM
Jan_CAN - 17 April 2019 06:44 AM

My initial reaction was that Notre Dame should be restored due to appreciation of history and the architectural skill and craftsmanship that created this cathedral.  But other thoughts and questions have come to mind.

Almost instantly following the fire, many millions of dollars have been pledged to save this building, yet this does not happen to this extent when there are major catastrophes that threaten human lives.  Current architectural skills and resources might be put to better use building structures for our present and future needs (e.g. dams and levees).

Medieval buildings such as this one cost exorbitant amounts of money to maintain, let alone repair and restore.  At what point should it be accepted that, as old as they are, nothing is permanent, and that as sad as it might be, there may come a time to let them crumble?

What French politician wants to be the one who says that it’s time for Notre Dame to crumble?  Not going to happen.  Anyway, it’s going to put a lot of workers to work, so it will be good for their economy.

Very true – it’s not that time for Notre Dame, certainly not according to public opinion, and I don’t really disagree.  I was just thinking about the billions of dollars spent on maintaining and repairing the many historical buildings, with the costs increasing over the years, and wondering how much longer it can continue for some of these.

Yes, there is a limit.  Apparently Trump thinks it’s OK for Puerto Rico to crumble, for example.

And for Flint to continue to be toxic.

 
 
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19 April 2019 06:59
 

My wife and I vacationed in Paris a couple of years ago. We visited Notre Dame.

I was raised Roman Catholic, so churches hold a certain fondness for me. Once in a while I go inside one and take in the atmosphere: the sense of space; the coolness and dark; the creak of the pews; the smell of burning candle wax; the echo of hushed voices; the light streaming through the stained glass windows.

Notre Dame was the archetype of all Catholic churches to me. It was all that I was familiar with from my childhood, except carried out to a spectacular degree. Amongst all that art, sculpture, architecture and history, perhaps the thing that caught my imagination most were the gargoyles. I loved them. So inventive. So Ugly. So fun. They were supposedly souls caught between heaven and hell after death. I admired their spirit; leering, snarling, grinning, and on rainy days, spitting water on the living Parisians far below. They seemed to have accepted their fate and were giving both God and the Devil a spirited Fuck You.

A Parisian female coworker of mine said she was in mourning. I understand. I feel sad too.

Although I am an agnostic, I believe in sacred places. The vast majority of the ones I’ve experienced are outdoors in nature, but a few are manmade. Notre Dame was probably at the top of that list. Building that cathedral over the span of two hundred years, was a labor of love. It was in praise of the divine and sacred. The workers did their absolute best because they wanted god to see their work. Their work was a physical prayer; an active meditation.

They will rebuild Notre Dame. Millionaires and billionaires will want to jump on that tax write off. They want to look soulful and cultured. Perhaps some of them are. I hope Trump keeps his checkbook closed. That would be obscene.

The oak rafters will be replaced with metal beams. Computers, laser guided cutting devices, possibly 3D printers, and every conceiveable modern tool will quickly recreate the work that originally took decades to make.

But it won’t be the same. It won’t have the same heart and soul.

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19 April 2019 07:41
 
Cheshire Cat - 19 April 2019 06:59 AM

My wife and I vacationed in Paris a couple of years ago. We visited Notre Dame.

I was raised Roman Catholic, so churches hold a certain fondness for me. Once in a while I go inside one and take in the atmosphere: the sense of space; the coolness and dark; the creak of the pews; the smell of burning candle wax; the echo of hushed voices; the light streaming through the stained glass windows.

Notre Dame was the archetype of all Catholic churches to me. It was all that I was familiar with from my childhood, except carried out to a spectacular degree. Amongst all that art, sculpture, architecture and history, perhaps the thing that caught my imagination most were the gargoyles. I loved them. So inventive. So Ugly. So fun. They were supposedly souls caught between heaven and hell after death. I admired their spirit; leering, snarling, grinning, and on rainy days, spitting water on the living Parisians far below. They seemed to have accepted their fate and were giving both God and the Devil a spirited Fuck You.

A Parisian female coworker of mine said she was in mourning. I understand. I feel sad too.

Although I am an agnostic, I believe in sacred places. The vast majority of the ones I’ve experienced are outdoors in nature, but a few are manmade. Notre Dame was probably at the top of that list. Building that cathedral over the span of two hundred years, was a labor of love. It was in praise of the divine and sacred. The workers did their absolute best because they wanted god to see their work. Their work was a physical prayer; an active meditation.

They will rebuild Notre Dame. Millionaires and billionaires will want to jump on that tax write off. They want to look soulful and cultured. Perhaps some of them are. I hope Trump keeps his checkbook closed. That would be obscene.

The oak rafters will be replaced with metal beams. Computers, laser guided cutting devices, possibly 3D printers, and every conceiveable modern tool will quickly recreate the work that originally took decades to make.

But it won’t be the same. It won’t have the same heart and soul.

My wife and I climbed to the top of it (on a tour) in 1987.  I agree with your sentiments.  It’s impossible to completely replace something like that.

 
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19 April 2019 08:01
 
Cheshire Cat - 19 April 2019 06:59 AM

The oak rafters will be replaced with metal beams. Computers, laser guided cutting devices, possibly 3D printers, and every conceiveable modern tool will quickly recreate the work that originally took decades to make.

But it won’t be the same. It won’t have the same heart and soul.

I think they will go the other way and hire the best hand-craftsmen to make it as close and handmade as possible.