Question for Creationists (and Trump’s fake news disciples)

 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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23 May 2019 10:56
 

I found this letter to the editor in the April 21 New York Times Book Review:

Journalism’s Advocate
To the Editor:

I enjoyed reading Preet Bharara’s review of “Truth in Our Times,” (March 17), David E. McCraw’s insider’s view of press freedom. But I disagree with Bharara’s implication that the epithet “fake news” necessarily forces a surrender: “No intelligent response can suffice, no evidence-based retort can win.”

“Fake news” need not be a conversation stopper. In debates with creationists, some scientists have taken to asking a simple question that either stops creationists in their tracks or forces them to acknowledge the bad faith in which they argue: “What evidence would you accept that evolution is correct?” Most reply, “None.” Perhaps reporters and the public should begin asking those who throw about the “fake news” charge, “What evidence would you accept that this is not ‘fake news’?”

MICHAEL J. DOUGHERTY
LITTLETON, COLO.

 
 
Twissel
 
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Twissel
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23 May 2019 11:03
 

good idea.

But in practice, you also get the ‘none’ answer.

 
 
unsmoked
 
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24 May 2019 13:12
 
Twissel - 23 May 2019 11:03 AM

good idea.

But in practice, you also get the ‘none’ answer.

True.  I think Dougherty’s point is that this gets them to acknowledge ‘the bad faith in which they argue’.

 

 
 
Brick Bungalow
 
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Brick Bungalow
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26 May 2019 00:02
 

If only they had the basic honesty required to answer a straight question with a straight answer. Ever watch a Trump spokesperson hold a press conference? It’s not simply self deception at work. It’s a complete disinterest in even searching for the truth.

 
Twissel
 
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Twissel
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26 May 2019 01:59
 

Telling the truth is a waste of airtime as far as Trump is concerned: if you have an audience and you don’t exaggerate beyond all credulity, you haven’t made best use of the attention.

 
 
unsmoked
 
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27 May 2019 12:02
 
Twissel - 26 May 2019 01:59 AM

Telling the truth is a waste of airtime as far as Trump is concerned: if you have an audience and you don’t exaggerate beyond all credulity, you haven’t made best use of the attention.

Well put.  This brings to mind 1950’s cigarette ads; then the challenge of spreading the Gospels.

 
 
proximacentauri
 
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proximacentauri
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28 May 2019 13:42
 

Never underestimate the ability of Americans to stand firm and resolute in the face of opposing facts and reason.

Isaac Asimov hit the nail on the head long ago…
“There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that “my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”

 

 
unsmoked
 
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29 May 2019 12:44
 
proximacentauri - 28 May 2019 01:42 PM

Never underestimate the ability of Americans to stand firm and resolute in the face of opposing facts and reason.

Isaac Asimov hit the nail on the head long ago…
“There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that “my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”

Good one.  This morning, after seeing a New Yorker cartoon about a man looking out his window at flying saucers invading the city, and his wife watching the news about the attack on TV saying, “President Trump says the Democrats are to blame for this.”

This caused me to wonder if Trump will say something to garner the votes of the millions of Democrats and Independents who believe in conspiracy theories?

Example:  Trump might tweet something like, “Our Air Force, which by the way is the most tremendous in the world, and the tremendous Saudi Air Force which buys our tremendous planes, sees many unexplained things up there that the tremendously fake news doesn’t report because they are too busy reporting fake new about witch hunts and fake news about climate change which as everyone knows is a hoax unlike the tremendous strange unexplained things the Air Force sees up there.”

See what I mean?  That could get him 3,762.000 tremendous votes that he didn’t have before. 

https://www.livescience.com/63658-why-people-believe-conspiracy-theories.html

Is Trump a conspiracy thinker?
Although we can’t know how he would score on our questionnaires, President Trump’s public statements and behavior suggest that he fits the profile fairly well.

First, he does display some schizotypal characteristics. He is famously untrusting of others. Donald Trump Jr. has described how his father used to admonish him in kindergarten not to trust anyone under any circumstances. The elder Trump is also relatively eccentric. He is a unique politician who doesn’t hew consistently to party lines or political norms. He has espoused unusual ideas, including the theory that people have a limited lifetime reservoir of energy that physical exercise depletes.

President Trump also seems to see the world as a dangerous place. His campaign speeches warned about murderous rapist immigrants flooding across the border and black communities being in “the worst shape” they’ve ever been. His inauguration address described a hellish landscape of “American carnage.”

 

 

[ Edited: 29 May 2019 13:37 by unsmoked]