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Apollo 11

 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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20 July 2019 09:30
 

Well, it’s been 50 years since the first human walked on the moon.  And it’s rather astounding that this was achieved only 66 years after the Wright brothers’ first flight.  (Neil Armstrong took a piece of wood from this first flight with him on Apollo 11.)

It represents the spirit of exploration and the thrill of scientific discovery.  It’s exciting and dramatic – a first.  It inspired the imagination and made us think that nothing was impossible.  Everything after became “If we can land a man on the moon, why can’t we ...?”.

However, where does this mission fit in the priority of human accomplishments?  Should not the discovery of antibiotics outshine it because of its positive effects for humanity?


Some thoughts ...

— Military implications:  The U.S. government’s goals were not just scientific, but it was a race with the Russians.  Although often seen as a human accomplishment, it was not the UN flag or one representing humankind that was planted on the moon – it was an American flag.

— Cost/benefits (financial and in lives lost):  All great endeavours will carry risks and have a cost.  Scientific knowledge for its own sake has merit and often leads to unforeseen advances in other directions.  But, have the benefits justified the cost?  What if such scientific genius and energy had been devoted to say, solving the problem of famine and world hunger?  Or today, on climate change?

— Do we belong in space before we have dealt with the most basic problems of humanity here on planet Earth, for which it is in our ability and power to solve?

 
 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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20 July 2019 09:47
 

I don’t think it’s really an “either / or” when we discuss NASA and healthcare or hunger. Remember that NASA’s budget is about 3% of our defense budget.

Should we spend more on healthcare and solving hunger? Absolutely! But how about we don’t strip NASA’s tiny budget and take a bite out of the military’s massive budget instead?

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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20 July 2019 09:57
 
icehorse - 20 July 2019 09:47 AM

I don’t think it’s really an “either / or” when we discuss NASA and healthcare or hunger. Remember that NASA’s budget is about 3% of our defense budget.

Should we spend more on healthcare and solving hunger? Absolutely! But how about we don’t strip NASA’s tiny budget and take a bite out of the military’s massive budget instead?

True – it doesn’t have to be ‘either/or’, but governments and big business will fund according to their interests.  Oligarchy in space.  It will not just be about science, but about power and profit.  Spy satellites and the ability to shut us down or blow us all up from space.  It’s not all good stuff.

 
 
icehorse
 
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20 July 2019 10:05
 

It’s perhaps an interesting philosophical question. But it strikes me that all invention and innovation can be used for positive purposes or for bad. That said, I think that without invention and innovation, life would be substantially diminished. Exploration is in our blood.

 
 
LadyJane
 
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20 July 2019 10:18
 

Along with the flag they left a plaque that read…

“Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July 1969, A.D.  We came in peace for all mankind.”

What the hell happened to that sentiment?

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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20 July 2019 10:29
 
icehorse - 20 July 2019 10:05 AM

It’s perhaps an interesting philosophical question. But it strikes me that all invention and innovation can be used for positive purposes or for bad. That said, I think that without invention and innovation, life would be substantially diminished. Exploration is in our blood.

Yes, invention and innovation can be used for good or bad.  And no doubt, it is in our blood; however, there are also less lofty traits in our blood.  Which means it would be preferable if space exploration was more of a cooperative, multi-country endeavour, driven primarily by common scientific goals, in order to control for the ‘bad’.

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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20 July 2019 10:35
 
LadyJane - 20 July 2019 10:18 AM

Along with the flag they left a plaque that read…

“Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July 1969, A.D.  We came in peace for all mankind.”

What the hell happened to that sentiment?

Yeah, what happened to that?

[ Edited: 20 July 2019 10:46 by Jan_CAN]
 
 
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20 July 2019 11:29
 

The U.S. went there because they could, and sometimes that feeble excuse is valid.  The Apollo program ended and apparently NASA got what they wanted and moved to other projects. Landing on the moon is a phenomenal accomplishment in itself, but apparently the cost/benefit ratio is out of balance.

Besides, machines can do much of what a man can do with less risk and cost.  I say, let NASA decide what to do with its budget instead of inexperienced politicians and pundits.

 
Cheshire Cat
 
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20 July 2019 12:06
 

Sure, the “Space Race” started out as a pissing contest between the United States and USSR, but it ended on a very different note.

For the first time, living human beings left earth and saw the greater reality of our true place in the Cosmos.

The picture from Apollo 17 called the “Blue Marble” is probably the greatest gift of the space program to mankind.

It is more than just a photograph. It is visual poetry.

Several astronauts have mentioned how they would have loved to have been able to share the experience with everyone — to have been able to take them into deep space and look back at the earth personally. They’ve pondered how it would have helped people to overcome their petty prejudices and hatreds. This photo, and a few others, (Earthrise, Pale Blue Dot), were the best they could do.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of human beings don’t have the imagination or inner sense of spiritual connectedness to allow this photo to have much effect. It’s just another pretty picture to them.

Pity.

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Jan_CAN
 
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20 July 2019 12:24
 
Cheshire Cat - 20 July 2019 12:06 PM

Sure, the “Space Race” started out as a pissing contest between the United States and USSR, but it ended on a very different note.

For the first time, living human beings left earth and saw the greater reality of our true place in the Cosmos.

The picture from Apollo 17 called the “Blue Marble” is probably the greatest gift of the space program to mankind.

It is more than just a photograph. It is visual poetry.

Several astronauts have mentioned how they would have loved to have been able to share the experience with everyone — to have been able to take them into deep space and look back at the earth personally. They’ve pondered how it would have helped people to overcome their petty prejudices and hatreds. This photo, and a few others, (Earthrise, Pale Blue Dot), were the best they could do.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of human beings don’t have the imagination or inner sense of spiritual connectedness to allow this photo to have much effect. It’s just another pretty picture to them.

Pity.

Thanks for this – we do live on a most magnificent ‘Blue Marble’ and seeing such images can fill us puny humans with awe and wonder, and purpose.

 
 
LadyJane
 
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20 July 2019 14:20
 

Chris Hadfield was kind enough to bestow us with a gallery of photographs taken from The International Space Station.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jCg-LDJ-A0

 
 
EN
 
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EN
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20 July 2019 14:22
 
Jan_CAN - 20 July 2019 10:35 AM
LadyJane - 20 July 2019 10:18 AM

Along with the flag they left a plaque that read…

“Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July 1969, A.D.  We came in peace for all mankind.”

What the hell happened to that sentiment?

Yeah, what happened to that?

That was not the sentiment of everyone.  Those who have other designs have ended up in power.

 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
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20 July 2019 14:57
 

Physically revising that embarrassing bit of history will no doubt cost billions!

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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20 July 2019 15:09
 
LadyJane - 20 July 2019 02:20 PM

Chris Hadfield was kind enough to bestow us with a gallery of photographs taken from The International Space Station.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jCg-LDJ-A0

Beautiful.

Imbedded in that link was another one by him about how space travel expands your mind.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPvSRPsWhOQ

 

 
 
Cheshire Cat
 
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20 July 2019 15:28
 
nonverbal - 20 July 2019 02:57 PM

Physically revising that embarrassing bit of history will no doubt cost billions!

“Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July 1969, A.D.  We came in peace for all mankind.”

Yes, that statement expresses way too much of that sentimental, liberal, touch-feely, kumbaya, bleeding-heart crap.

When we get to the Moon again, we should make a point to revise that plaque, even if it does cost billions.

We need a more up-to-date Moon Landing Motto; one for the Trump era.

Perhaps:

“Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July 1969, A.D.
We came for the glory of the United States, (the greatest nation to ever exist), Capitalism, Corporations, Christianity, Western Culture and the White Race.”

[ Edited: 20 July 2019 15:32 by Cheshire Cat]
 
 
LadyJane
 
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20 July 2019 16:14
 
Jan_CAN - 20 July 2019 03:09 PM
LadyJane - 20 July 2019 02:20 PM

Chris Hadfield was kind enough to bestow us with a gallery of photographs taken from The International Space Station.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jCg-LDJ-A0

Beautiful.

Imbedded in that link was another one by him about how space travel expands your mind.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPvSRPsWhOQ

I don’t wanna overstate this, but, Chris Hadfield is the greatest astronaut in the history of everything.

I think his books are as inspiring as his photos are exquisite.  And delivered with the sort of humour you come to expect from every great Canadian.  I’d say his experience in space was humbling, but, I’m pretty sure he came that way.  It’s no Oddity…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaOC9danxNo

 
 
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