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College students unclear about Free Speech - FIRE

 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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27 July 2019 08:12
 

According the to survey of 2225 U.S. college students linked to below:

- 96% think it’s important to have their rights and liberties (e.g. free speech) protected on campus.
- But 57% think that “offensive” or “intolerant” views should be restricted.

Apparently, many students are unclear on the concept of free speech.

free speech survey

 
 
Antisocialdarwinist
 
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Antisocialdarwinist
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27 July 2019 08:23
 
icehorse - 27 July 2019 08:12 AM

According the to survey of 2225 U.S. college students linked to below:

- 96% think it’s important to have their rights and liberties (e.g. free speech) protected on campus.
- But 57% think that “offensive” or “intolerant” views should be restricted.

Apparently, many students are unclear on the concept of free speech.

free speech survey

I think the view that “offensive” or “intolerant” views should be restricted is itself offensive and intolerant, and should therefore be restricted.

 
 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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27 July 2019 08:26
 
Antisocialdarwinist - 27 July 2019 08:23 AM
icehorse - 27 July 2019 08:12 AM

According the to survey of 2225 U.S. college students linked to below:

- 96% think it’s important to have their rights and liberties (e.g. free speech) protected on campus.
- But 57% think that “offensive” or “intolerant” views should be restricted.

Apparently, many students are unclear on the concept of free speech.

free speech survey

I think the view that “offensive” or “intolerant” views should be restricted is itself offensive and intolerant, and should therefore be restricted.

Well I think your view should be restricted.

 
 
GAD
 
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GAD
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27 July 2019 09:34
 

Typical of the social justice crowd, they use equality like religion uses tolerance.

 
 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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27 July 2019 12:24
 
icehorse - 27 July 2019 08:26 AM
Antisocialdarwinist - 27 July 2019 08:23 AM
icehorse - 27 July 2019 08:12 AM

According the to survey of 2225 U.S. college students linked to below:

- 96% think it’s important to have their rights and liberties (e.g. free speech) protected on campus.
- But 57% think that “offensive” or “intolerant” views should be restricted.

Apparently, many students are unclear on the concept of free speech.

free speech survey

I think the view that “offensive” or “intolerant” views should be restricted is itself offensive and intolerant, and should therefore be restricted.

Well I think your view should be restricted.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communist_Control_Act_of_1954  Enemies of the people?

Would Trump like to silence The Washington Post, The New York Times, CNN, The New Yorker, etc.?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_of_North_Korea

“The media of North Korea is amongst the most strictly controlled in the world. The constitution nominally provides for freedom of speech and the press. However, the government prohibits the exercise of these rights in practice, unless it is in praise of the country and its government and leader.”

 
 
Skipshot
 
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Skipshot
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27 July 2019 17:08
 
GAD - 27 July 2019 09:34 AM

Typical of the social justice crowd, they use equality like religion uses tolerance.

Just like conservatives like to use “law and order” when they are in control to justify their bullshit, but switch to being victims of a nanny state when they are out of power.

Getting back to the OP, how is intolerance tolerated?  Freedom of speech is a widely misunderstood concept, but in general rights may be understood with, “Your rights end where mine begin.”

 
mapadofu
 
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mapadofu
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28 July 2019 05:58
 

Here are what I believe to be the questions relevant to the OP:


Q19 Colleges and universities should be able to restrict student expression of political views that are hurtful or offensive to certain students.
Strongly agree Agree
Disagree Strongly disagree

Q30It is important that my civil liberties are protected.
Strongly agree Agree
Disagree Strongly disagree


I’m Q30 is the one that got a 96% “agree” rate, but I’m pretty sure Q19 is the one that relates to the 57% agree rate.

I also grabbed
Q18 Students should have the right to free speech on campus, even if what they are saying offends others.
Strongly agree Agree
Disagree Strongly disagree

 

Q18 responses
“Three-quarters of students (75 percent) think students should have the right to free speech on campus, even if what is being said offends others. Despite this, we also find that:” (ph. 7)

[ Edited: 28 July 2019 07:01 by mapadofu]
 
mapadofu
 
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mapadofu
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28 July 2019 07:00
 

I figure that the way that an individual responds to these kinds of questions mainly depends on what scenarios they envision when considering “offensive or hurtful speech” and what kind of restrictions that they imagine would be put in place.

 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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28 July 2019 08:29
 
mapadofu - 28 July 2019 07:00 AM

I figure that the way that an individual responds to these kinds of questions mainly depends on what scenarios they envision when considering “offensive or hurtful speech” and what kind of restrictions that they imagine would be put in place.

Hitchen’s asked: “Who is smart enough to tell YOU what YOU cannot hear?”  He proceeds to explain that he’s never met anyone smart enough to give that power to, and I agree.

 
 
mapadofu
 
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mapadofu
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28 July 2019 09:01
 

What comes to mind to you when thinking about hurtful or offensive speech? 

.
.
.

What is the full range of behaviors that fall into that category?
.
.
.


Does a university have a justified basis to restrict any of the activities you thought of when considering the full range of potential speech acts?

 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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28 July 2019 09:11
 

The standard question is: “Is this speech likely to incite IMMINENT violence?”

I’d say that if it’s not, it’s protected, no matter how vile.

 
 
mapadofu
 
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mapadofu
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28 July 2019 09:13
 

But that is not what they asked.

Should that, only restrict imminent threat speech, be the policy everywhere? 

Are there kinds of speech that fall short of this threshold but that reduce a university’s ability to fulfill its mission?

[ Edited: 28 July 2019 09:15 by mapadofu]
 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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28 July 2019 09:17
 
mapadofu - 28 July 2019 09:13 AM

But that is not what they asked.

Should that, only restrict imminent threat speech, be the policy everywhere?

To me that should be the default on campuses, as it is the default “in real life”. This is not to say that repugnant speech should not be criticized, it should. It’s just that - for many reasons - it should not be stifled.

 
 
mapadofu
 
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mapadofu
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28 July 2019 09:23
 

Imagine you are a professor.  There is a student in one of your classes who repeatedly and disruptively rants about his/her favorite divisive political topic.  What recourse, if any, should the university have to address that situation?  Just criticism?


What were the range of speech acts you imagined in response to my earlier post?

 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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28 July 2019 09:32
 
mapadofu - 28 July 2019 09:23 AM

Imagine you are a professor.  There is a student in one of your classes who repeatedly and disruptively rants about his/her favorite divisive political topic.  What recourse, if any, should the university have to address that situation?  Just criticism?

What were the range of speech acts you imagined in response to my earlier post?

Freedom of speech does not mean freedom to disrupt other people’s speech. Freedom of speech does not guarantee a platform, although I think “the commons” is implied. IMO, the best professors would plan for controlled Q and A sessions. Offensive speech should be allowed as should criticisms. But in the lecture hall, only the professor’s speech is guaranteed, no student would be guaranteed speaking time in during class.

Recently the “heckler’s veto” has been cropping up on many campuses when unpopular speakers try to speak. Such disruption is not consistent with free speech.

 
 
mapadofu
 
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mapadofu
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28 July 2019 09:40
 

So then do universities, and other private institutions, do have a justification for restricting some kinds of speech acts that fall short of the imminent threat threshold?

 
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