#168- Mind, Space & Motion A Conversation with Barbara Tversky

 
Nhoj Morley
 
Avatar
 
 
Nhoj Morley
Total Posts:  6362
Joined  22-02-2005
 
 
 
11 September 2019 13:32
 

In this episode of the Making Sense podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Barbara Tversky about how our senses of space and motion underlie our capacity for thought. They discuss the evolution of mind prior to language, the importance of imitation and gesture, the sensory and motor homunculi, the information communicated by motion, the role of “mirror neurons,” sense of direction, natural and unnatural categories, cognitive trade-offs, and other topics.

#168- Mind, Space & Motion A Conversation with Barbara Tversky


This thread is for listeners’ comments.

 
 
Brick Bungalow
 
Avatar
 
 
Brick Bungalow
Total Posts:  5142
Joined  28-05-2009
 
 
 
12 September 2019 16:35
 

I’m not qualified to comment on the accuracy of this but I found it to be one of thep most fascinating talks in quite some time. The bit about using gestures to problem solve conversations was especially poignant.

 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
 
Avatar
 
 
TheAnal_lyticPhilosopher
Total Posts:  920
Joined  13-02-2017
 
 
 
12 September 2019 18:36
 

I’m looking forward to listening to this myself—the first one I’ve had any interest in in almost a year.  I’ve put her book in my Amazon cart, just in case…

 
LadyJane
 
Avatar
 
 
LadyJane
Total Posts:  3329
Joined  26-03-2013
 
 
 
13 September 2019 05:50
 
Brick Bungalow - 12 September 2019 04:35 PM

I’m not qualified to comment on the accuracy of this but I found it to be one of thep most fascinating talks in quite some time. The bit about using gestures to problem solve conversations was especially poignant.

This was a good one.  I think reasonable discourse comes from mutual respect and having a genuine interest in other points of view.  These conversations are getting harder and harder to find online without all the egos getting in the way.  Especially without the benefit of visual gesturing.  A little humility and dialling down the tone makes it easier to listen and takes us to the heart of most issues.  Instead of just waiting for our turn to talk.

 
 
nonverbal
 
Avatar
 
 
nonverbal
Total Posts:  1807
Joined  31-10-2015
 
 
 
14 September 2019 14:02
 

I was aware of a strong connection between autism and a particular type of movement disorder, but Dr. Tversky’s connections about these connections are fascinating. (I’ll do my best not to use the word “connection” again this week.)

Unending chicken/egg kinds of questions now come to mind regarding how some people’s brains fail to sort/distinguish things “normally,” which results in a movement “disorder,” and ultimately, full-blown autism. This will have me happily pondering ridiculous and unreliable notions that will not doubt occur to me for quite a while, I’m sure. I do think she’s on to something.

On the other hand, what about more moderately autistic people who have no hint of a movement disorder? What went on in their infant brains?

 
 
Nhoj Morley
 
Avatar
 
 
Nhoj Morley
Total Posts:  6362
Joined  22-02-2005
 
 
 
19 September 2019 06:54
 

I’ve heard this twice now. I like her. She says we don’t think things through. She might appreciate The Malarkey Scale. She says we categorize and hence make trade offs in cognition that can come up short. That is probably because our capacity to categorize is not unbounded either spatially or temporally. She might go for the idea of a chunk-limit. She says creativity breaks the patterns in our categorizing. I say narrating allows re-sequencing of quantities greater than the chunk-limit. Potayto, potahto. Let’s do lunch.

Who is moving our hands in gestures when we talk? Who is deciding which tilt of the brow is just right for the moment? Who is controlling the movement of pitch at the end of each phrase that turns everything into a polite question? Why does the pres sometimes look like he rowing an invisible boat?

Some stab at the air as they speak. These two are un-rhythmic speakers. The discussion overlooked the role of rhythm for other people.

I suggest that locomotion’s original survival advantage was the ability to get away from our poop. After millions of evolving generations, we’ve learned to locomote the stuff so we can stay where we are.