How a handful of people can ruin the lungs of the world

 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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19 September 2019 12:57
 

https://time.com/amazon-rainforest-disappearing/

As human activity in the Amazon ramps up, its future has never been less clear. Scientists warn that decades of human activity and a changing climate has brought the jungle near a “tipping point.” The rain forest is so-called because it’s such a wet place, where the trees pull up water from the earth that then gathers in the atmosphere to become rain. That balance is upended by deforestation, forest fires and global temperature rises. Experts warn that soon the water cycle will become irreversibly broken, locking in a trend of declining rainfall and longer dry seasons that began decades ago. At least half of the shrinking forest will give way to savanna. With as much as 17% of the forest lost already, scientists believe that the tipping point will be reached at 20% to 25% of deforestation even if climate change is tamed. If, as predicted, global temperatures rise by 4°C, much of the central, eastern and southern Amazon will certainly become barren scrubland.

Without effective world government the Earth is helpless to defend itself.  Those being born today may live to see the ‘lungs of the planet’ reduced to ‘barren scrubland.’

Why are we bequeathing a damaged planet to our grandchildren?

Comments on this article?  https://time.com/amazon-rainforest-disappearing/

 
 
DEGENERATEON
 
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DEGENERATEON
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20 September 2019 09:55
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20 September 2019 12:16
 
DEGENERATEON - 20 September 2019 09:55 AM

Lung repair:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2019-08-02/we-already-have-the-world-s-most-efficient-carbon-capture-technology

http://www.ecosystemgardening.com/paulownia-princess-tree-on-most-hated-plants-list.html

quote from this article:

Known as the Princess Tree, Empress Tree, and Royal Empress Tree, Paulownia Trees are highly invasive and are destroying native ecosystems from Maine to Florida and Texas, as well as the Pacific Northwest. However, open almost any gardening magazine and you’ll find adds touting this tree as an “amazing, fast-growing, shade tree.”

It is this fast-growing nature that is causing so many problems for native ecosystems. Growing up to 15 feet in a single year, this invasive tree shades out and outcompetes native plant communities for resources such as water and nutrients.

It thrives in disturbed soils, is drought and pollution tolerant, and easily takes over riparian areas. Every spring when it blooms, I am dismayed at how many more of these trees have gained a foothold along the wooded stream as I drive through my neighborhood.

It can reproduce from seed or root sprouts, which grow very quickly. A single tree can produce up to 20 million seeds each year, which are easily dispersed by wind and water. Even though the light purple blooms are quite pretty, I have learned to hate the sight of them.