The Irony of Thriving on Complexity

 
Jb8989
 
Avatar
 
 
Jb8989
Total Posts:  6394
Joined  31-01-2012
 
 
 
21 September 2019 13:26
 

With information and decision overload starting to saturate the tired little minds of our social counterparts, we’ll continue to hear things like “you think too much,” or, “that’s too much thinking for me.” Take a beat when people makes these types of comments to you. You’ll probably notice that you’ll hear it most when you’re offering a counterpoint or asking a question not riddled by political digestions or digital delusions. How dare thee?

Human decency and critical thinking used to transcend managerial structures and the social contract, but since people were already subconsciously accustom to the insecurity of being programmed to compartmentalize their daily subscriptions, they’re not noticing that the newness of this particular paradigm shift will bring them deeper into a persona they never really knew enough not to like. The walking dead think that you think too much.

 
 
EN
 
Avatar
 
 
EN
Total Posts:  21702
Joined  11-03-2007
 
 
 
21 September 2019 14:16
 

This sort of goes to the video that bb posted about Gunn and the other thinking part of the brain (can’t remember his name).  It takes effort to activate that part of the brain.  One-liners are easier.  It all boils down to laziness, or perhaps not having the time to really think.  Everyone should take up chess just for the discipline. It forces you to consider all the angles.

 
Jefe
 
Avatar
 
 
Jefe
Total Posts:  7135
Joined  15-02-2007
 
 
 
21 September 2019 15:26
 
Jb8989 - 21 September 2019 01:26 PM

With information and decision overload starting to saturate the tired little minds of our social counterparts, we’ll continue to hear things like “you think too much,” or, “that’s too much thinking for me.” Take a beat when people makes these types of comments to you. You’ll probably notice that you’ll hear it most when you’re offering a counterpoint or asking a question not riddled by political digestions or digital delusions. How dare thee?

Human decency and critical thinking used to transcend managerial structures and the social contract, but since people were already subconsciously accustom to the insecurity of being programmed to compartmentalize their daily subscriptions, they’re not noticing that the newness of this particular paradigm shift will bring them deeper into a persona they never really knew enough not to like. The walking dead think that you think too much.

TLDR

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
Avatar
 
 
Jan_CAN
Total Posts:  3468
Joined  21-10-2016
 
 
 
21 September 2019 17:46
 
Jb8989 - 21 September 2019 01:26 PM

With information and decision overload starting to saturate the tired little minds of our social counterparts, we’ll continue to hear things like “you think too much,” or, “that’s too much thinking for me.” Take a beat when people makes these types of comments to you. You’ll probably notice that you’ll hear it most when you’re offering a counterpoint or asking a question not riddled by political digestions or digital delusions. How dare thee?

Human decency and critical thinking used to transcend managerial structures and the social contract, but since people were already subconsciously accustom to the insecurity of being programmed to compartmentalize their daily subscriptions, they’re not noticing that the newness of this particular paradigm shift will bring them deeper into a persona they never really knew enough not to like. The walking dead think that you think too much.

Just so y’know, those of us with tired little minds tend to shut off or get annoyed if those counterpoints and questions are loaded with vagueries and words like compartmentalize and paradigm.  It’s just too much for us.  However, we instinctually recognize when we’re being talked down to so go into self-defense mode.

Yeah, we can all engage in critical thinking and can be held responsible if we choose not to do so.  But sometimes a lack of ability to explain one’s position in ‘educated’ terms does not necessarily mean that it has not been thought out or that it is ‘wrong’.  Just sayin’.

[ Edited: 21 September 2019 17:49 by Jan_CAN]
 
 
Brick Bungalow
 
Avatar
 
 
Brick Bungalow
Total Posts:  5181
Joined  28-05-2009
 
 
 
30 September 2019 14:02
 

I’m not a Marxist or any other kind of social theorist but I do sometimes entertain the idea that institutions and ideologies have their own unique adaptive arcs and pathologies.

Specific to this point, I feel like the bombardment of information and concepts isn’t entirely an accident of history. Advertising, for example uses information overload and choice paralysis quite deliberately. Political speeches frequently digress at a rapid pace for the purpose of obfuscating an inconvenient point. Contemporary apologetics is practically composed of this tactic. Cold reading, divination and similar techniques rely upon our inability to carefully distinguish noise from signal. Worst of all, well meaning people (including me) can frequently be overheard employing such tactics out of compulsive habit and childhood indoctrination.

Were we more rational, on balance in the past? I sorta doubt it. The parameters move around a bit with population flux and technology but I think our weaknesses are pretty consistent.

I will certainly agree that we should get back to an efficient focus on concept and principle and away from the rhetoric of tribe. We should think more.