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America’s Original Sin

 
GAD
 
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GAD
Total Posts:  17780
Joined  15-02-2008
 
 
 
06 November 2019 09:28
 
EN - 06 November 2019 08:59 AM
GAD - 06 November 2019 07:27 AM
EN - 06 November 2019 02:49 AM
GAD - 05 November 2019 09:43 PM

You can not change or fix the past, move on.

Yes, we are moving on, limping forever from our self-inflicted wound.  But at least maybe we can avoid doing it again.

Not really, we are actually OK, just some of us are hypochondriacs.

Have you ever seen “Trading Places” with Eddie Murphy?  Would you really like to trade places with an average black guy?

It’s a movie dude, but thanks for proving my point.

 
 
Garret
 
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Garret
Total Posts:  555
Joined  16-01-2019
 
 
 
06 November 2019 11:18
 

An interesting facet of the slave trade that often gets forgotten is that of all the slaves that were kidnapped from Africa, only 3% came to the US.  Because of the cooler climate,  even in places like Georgia, US slaves were more likely to survive more than a few years and so we’re able to be used reproductively.

Haiti, in contrast, was importing approximately 40,000 humans each year, but it took 30 years for the population to double from 250,000 slaves to 500,000 slaves.

 
bbearren
 
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bbearren
Total Posts:  3855
Joined  20-11-2013
 
 
 
06 November 2019 12:56
 
GAD - 06 November 2019 09:28 AM
EN - 06 November 2019 08:59 AM
GAD - 06 November 2019 07:27 AM
EN - 06 November 2019 02:49 AM
GAD - 05 November 2019 09:43 PM

You can not change or fix the past, move on.

Yes, we are moving on, limping forever from our self-inflicted wound.  But at least maybe we can avoid doing it again.

Not really, we are actually OK, just some of us are hypochondriacs.

Have you ever seen “Trading Places” with Eddie Murphy?  Would you really like to trade places with an average black guy?

It’s a movie dude, but thanks for proving my point.

“There ain’t a white person in this room that would change places with me ... and I’m rich!”

 
 
nonverbal
 
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nonverbal
Total Posts:  1859
Joined  31-10-2015
 
 
 
06 November 2019 13:42
 
unsmoked - 05 November 2019 11:53 AM

https://theweek.com/articles/860454/americas-original-sin

This one page article reminds us what made the United States powerful and rich. 

Slavery’s imprint on the present

“The abolition of slavery did not end white supremacy. Wealthy white Southerners lost most of their wealth right after the Civil War, but regained most of it by re-establishing the region’s aristocracy and oppressive racial hierarchy. When federal troops were pulled out of the South in 1877, ending Reconstruction, the newly freed slaves were violently locked out of political and economic life. Many were forced into sharecropping, an exploitative form of pseudo-slavery. Northern politicians embraced legal and de facto segregation as well. African-Americans fleeing apartheid regimes in the South were squeezed into economically depressed slums by dis­crimi­na­tory lending laws. A century of legal dis­crimi­na­tion crippled black families’ ability to get decent educations, find jobs, buy homes, and build wealth. That legacy endures. In 2016, the average black family had a net worth of $17,600, compared with $171,000 for the average white family.

Take a few minutes to read the rest of this article which begins in 1619 when an English privateer ship named the White Lion carrying between 20 and 30 Africans in chains landed at Point Comfort in Virginia.  https://theweek.com/articles/860454/americas-original-sin

https://www.politico.com/blogs/under-the-radar/2017/02/trump-fbi-files-discrimination-case-235067 

 

It seems important for a descendant of slave ownership/trading, which according to my late grandmother I am, to be able to feel free of guilt that might be associated with an ancestors’ actions. All around the world, pockets of violent crime can still be found, including extreme human exploitation. According to this article, tens of millions of people endure slavery today:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_21st_century

I think it’s also important to keep in mind that moral reasoning has evolved over the centuries, and will no doubt continue to evolve. My ancestor was at times a pirate, a slave broker who traded shipments of tobacco for shipments of people, a cartographer, and a diplomat. That is, he was a supreme asshole in today’s world. Yet he was well thought of in his time and place. No doubt, lots of highly regarded people from today’s world will be seen as unforgivably sinful to future observers of history.

 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
Total Posts:  8759
Joined  20-02-2006
 
 
 
07 November 2019 11:05
 
nonverbal - 06 November 2019 01:42 PM
unsmoked - 05 November 2019 11:53 AM

https://theweek.com/articles/860454/americas-original-sin

This one page article reminds us what made the United States powerful and rich. 

Slavery’s imprint on the present

“The abolition of slavery did not end white supremacy. Wealthy white Southerners lost most of their wealth right after the Civil War, but regained most of it by re-establishing the region’s aristocracy and oppressive racial hierarchy. When federal troops were pulled out of the South in 1877, ending Reconstruction, the newly freed slaves were violently locked out of political and economic life. Many were forced into sharecropping, an exploitative form of pseudo-slavery. Northern politicians embraced legal and de facto segregation as well. African-Americans fleeing apartheid regimes in the South were squeezed into economically depressed slums by dis­crimi­na­tory lending laws. A century of legal dis­crimi­na­tion crippled black families’ ability to get decent educations, find jobs, buy homes, and build wealth. That legacy endures. In 2016, the average black family had a net worth of $17,600, compared with $171,000 for the average white family.

Take a few minutes to read the rest of this article which begins in 1619 when an English privateer ship named the White Lion carrying between 20 and 30 Africans in chains landed at Point Comfort in Virginia.  https://theweek.com/articles/860454/americas-original-sin

https://www.politico.com/blogs/under-the-radar/2017/02/trump-fbi-files-discrimination-case-235067 

 

It seems important for a descendant of slave ownership/trading, which according to my late grandmother I am, to be able to feel free of guilt that might be associated with an ancestors’ actions. All around the world, pockets of violent crime can still be found, including extreme human exploitation. According to this article, tens of millions of people endure slavery today:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_21st_century

I think it’s also important to keep in mind that moral reasoning has evolved over the centuries, and will no doubt continue to evolve. My ancestor was at times a pirate, a slave broker who traded shipments of tobacco for shipments of people, a cartographer, and a diplomat. That is, he was a supreme asshole in today’s world. Yet he was well thought of in his time and place. No doubt, lots of highly regarded people from today’s world will be seen as unforgivably sinful to future observers of history.

Will Thomas Jefferson ever be seen as unforgivably sinful?  He wrote a letter to George Washington describing the profitability of raising children for sale at public auctions.  https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-dark-side-of-thomas-jefferson-35976004/?all

“The critical turning point in Jefferson’s thinking may well have come in 1792. As Jefferson was counting up the agricultural profits and losses of his plantation in a letter to President Washington that year, it occurred to him that there was a phenomenon he had perceived at Monticello but never actually measured. He proceeded to calculate it in a barely legible, scribbled note in the middle of a page, enclosed in brackets. What Jefferson set out clearly for the first time was that he was making a 4 percent profit every year on the birth of black children. The enslaved were yielding him a bonanza, a perpetual human dividend at compound interest. Jefferson wrote, “I allow nothing for losses by death, but, on the contrary, shall presently take credit four per cent. per annum, for their increase over and above keeping up their own numbers.” His plantation was producing inexhaustible human assets. The percentage was predictable.”

 

[ Edited: 07 November 2019 11:09 by unsmoked]
 
 
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