The Ghetto Gaze

 
Jb8989
 
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Jb8989
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14 June 2020 13:02
 

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

[ Edited: 14 June 2020 19:08 by Jb8989]
 
 
diding
 
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diding
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16 June 2020 08:25
 
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

 
Jb8989
 
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Jb8989
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16 June 2020 10:42
 
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

 
 
diding
 
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diding
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16 June 2020 10:56
 
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 10:42 AM
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

 
Jb8989
 
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Jb8989
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16 June 2020 15:19
 
diding - 16 June 2020 10:56 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 10:42 AM
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

No shade, but spot the thug sounds like an awful name for a game, and probably another reason why I’m glad we have cops who are paid to play it.

 
 
diding
 
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diding
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22 June 2020 10:06
 
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 03:19 PM
diding - 16 June 2020 10:56 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 10:42 AM
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Women do it all the time and I’m supportive of them.  When getting on an elevator it’s called “I’ll catch the next one”.
Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

No shade, but spot the thug sounds like an awful name for a game, and probably another reason why I’m glad we have cops who are paid to play it.

Women play this type of game all day when waiting for the elevator.  It’s called “I’ll take the next car”.

[ Edited: 22 June 2020 15:16 by diding]
 
Jb8989
 
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Jb8989
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22 June 2020 20:21
 
diding - 22 June 2020 10:06 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 03:19 PM
diding - 16 June 2020 10:56 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 10:42 AM
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Women do it all the time and I’m supportive of them.  When getting on an elevator it’s called “I’ll catch the next one”.
Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

No shade, but spot the thug sounds like an awful name for a game, and probably another reason why I’m glad we have cops who are paid to play it.

Women play this type of game all day when waiting for the elevator.  It’s called “I’ll take the next car”.

I guess you gotta play a little Spot The Thug so you can get to the later rounds of Don’t Get Raped, but you’re trivializing The Gaze with your Prejudicial Parcheesi.

 
 
diding
 
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diding
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22 June 2020 23:50
 
Jb8989 - 22 June 2020 08:21 PM
diding - 22 June 2020 10:06 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 03:19 PM
diding - 16 June 2020 10:56 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 10:42 AM
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Women do it all the time and I’m supportive of them.  When getting on an elevator it’s called “I’ll catch the next one”.
Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

No shade, but spot the thug sounds like an awful name for a game, and probably another reason why I’m glad we have cops who are paid to play it.

Women play this type of game all day when waiting for the elevator.  It’s called “I’ll take the next car”.

I guess you gotta play a little Spot The Thug so you can get to the later rounds of Don’t Get Raped, but you’re trivializing The Gaze with your Prejudicial Parcheesi.

I live in the Ghetto.  Zone 6 ATL. I learned the game a long time ago.  I was taught how to play it by a black kid who I employed to help me do construction.  We were talking about how not to be racist and he said “You can tell who the thugs are.  There! That guy right there”.  Then it became a thing.  He worked with me for several years. He lives in Trestle Tree apts.  Look it up, it’s a rough spot.  He was good at the game.

 
Jb8989
 
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Jb8989
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23 June 2020 06:32
 
diding - 22 June 2020 11:50 PM
Jb8989 - 22 June 2020 08:21 PM
diding - 22 June 2020 10:06 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 03:19 PM
diding - 16 June 2020 10:56 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 10:42 AM
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Women do it all the time and I’m supportive of them.  When getting on an elevator it’s called “I’ll catch the next one”.
Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

No shade, but spot the thug sounds like an awful name for a game, and probably another reason why I’m glad we have cops who are paid to play it.

Women play this type of game all day when waiting for the elevator.  It’s called “I’ll take the next car”.

I guess you gotta play a little Spot The Thug so you can get to the later rounds of Don’t Get Raped, but you’re trivializing The Gaze with your Prejudicial Parcheesi.

I live in the Ghetto.  Zone 6 ATL. I learned the game a long time ago.  I was taught how to play it by a black kid who I employed to help me do construction.  We were talking about how not to be racist and he said “You can tell who the thugs are.  There! That guy right there”.  Then it became a thing.  He worked with me for several years. He lives in Trestle Tree apts.  Look it up, it’s a rough spot.  He was good at the game.

Lol and Interesting. Any tell tale signs other than the obvious? One thing I learned from The Gaze is that a lot of police suspicion can make young kids living in the bad neighborhoods feel defective, and therefore sometimes act funky even if they’re squeaky clean.

 
 
diding
 
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diding
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23 June 2020 07:51
 
Jb8989 - 23 June 2020 06:32 AM
diding - 22 June 2020 11:50 PM
Jb8989 - 22 June 2020 08:21 PM
diding - 22 June 2020 10:06 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 03:19 PM
diding - 16 June 2020 10:56 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 10:42 AM
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Women do it all the time and I’m supportive of them.  When getting on an elevator it’s called “I’ll catch the next one”.
Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

No shade, but spot the thug sounds like an awful name for a game, and probably another reason why I’m glad we have cops who are paid to play it.

Women play this type of game all day when waiting for the elevator.  It’s called “I’ll take the next car”.

I guess you gotta play a little Spot The Thug so you can get to the later rounds of Don’t Get Raped, but you’re trivializing The Gaze with your Prejudicial Parcheesi.

I live in the Ghetto.  Zone 6 ATL. I learned the game a long time ago.  I was taught how to play it by a black kid who I employed to help me do construction.  We were talking about how not to be racist and he said “You can tell who the thugs are.  There! That guy right there”.  Then it became a thing.  He worked with me for several years. He lives in Trestle Tree apts.  Look it up, it’s a rough spot.  He was good at the game.

Lol and Interesting. Any tell tale signs other than the obvious? One thing I learned from The Gaze is that a lot of police suspicion can make young kids living in the bad neighborhoods feel defective, and therefore sometimes act funky even if they’re squeaky clean.

I’ll call my friend T.  T. said, half jokingly, that if someone has dreads or a grill or sagging pants or face tattoos that they might not be a thug, all of those things and they definitely were.  T. loved to skateboard and he was best friends with a white kid whose father I played tennis with.  That’s how I met T. He told me that he grew up around thugs.  His dad had him “slinging’ boy” (selling heroin) when he was 10.  When he knocked his girlfriend up I told him he should get a full time job because my work is spotty.  It’s funny because about a month before he got her pregnant, I was telling him about the Brookings Institute’s finding which stated that 80% of people can avoid poverty by doing three things: Finish High School, Get a full time job, and Don’t have kids until you’re married. I saw him right before the ‘Rona hit. He swung by my birthday party in March and he had gotten his GED, a full time job, a haircut, and his pants fit.  I guess he’s about 22 now. 

He went to visit his white friend at college once and they were doing some dumb shit and got caught shoplifting.  He told me that the cops cuffed him and his friend but not the white girls they were with. He ended up getting probation in some kind of plea but he had to pay a ridiculous amount of money (which he couldn’t) and it compounded somehow through fees for having to go to probation meetings.  His friend’s dad took care of his son who also got probation.  He told me that he gets followed around in stores all the time. I asked him if he knew that he looked like a thug and he laughed and said “Cause I am”.

 
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Jb8989
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23 June 2020 08:14
 
diding - 23 June 2020 07:51 AM
Jb8989 - 23 June 2020 06:32 AM
diding - 22 June 2020 11:50 PM
Jb8989 - 22 June 2020 08:21 PM
diding - 22 June 2020 10:06 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 03:19 PM
diding - 16 June 2020 10:56 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 10:42 AM
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Women do it all the time and I’m supportive of them.  When getting on an elevator it’s called “I’ll catch the next one”.
Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

No shade, but spot the thug sounds like an awful name for a game, and probably another reason why I’m glad we have cops who are paid to play it.

Women play this type of game all day when waiting for the elevator.  It’s called “I’ll take the next car”.

I guess you gotta play a little Spot The Thug so you can get to the later rounds of Don’t Get Raped, but you’re trivializing The Gaze with your Prejudicial Parcheesi.

I live in the Ghetto.  Zone 6 ATL. I learned the game a long time ago.  I was taught how to play it by a black kid who I employed to help me do construction.  We were talking about how not to be racist and he said “You can tell who the thugs are.  There! That guy right there”.  Then it became a thing.  He worked with me for several years. He lives in Trestle Tree apts.  Look it up, it’s a rough spot.  He was good at the game.

Lol and Interesting. Any tell tale signs other than the obvious? One thing I learned from The Gaze is that a lot of police suspicion can make young kids living in the bad neighborhoods feel defective, and therefore sometimes act funky even if they’re squeaky clean.

I’ll call my friend T.  T. said, half jokingly, that if someone has dreads or a grill or sagging pants or face tattoos that they might not be a thug, all of those things and they definitely were.  T. loved to skateboard and he was best friends with a white kid whose father I played tennis with.  That’s how I met T. He told me that he grew up around thugs.  His dad had him “slinging’ boy” (selling heroin) when he was 10.  When he knocked his girlfriend up I told him he should get a full time job because my work is spotty.  It’s funny because about a month before he got her pregnant, I was telling him about the Brookings Institute’s finding which stated that 80% of people can avoid poverty by doing three things: Finish High School, Get a full time job, and Don’t have kids until you’re married. I saw him right before the ‘Rona hit. He swung by my birthday party in March and he had gotten his GED, a full time job, a haircut, and his pants fit.  I guess he’s about 22 now. 

He went to visit his white friend at college once and they were doing some dumb shit and got caught shoplifting.  He told me that the cops cuffed him and his friend but not the white girls they were with. He ended up getting probation in some kind of plea but he had to pay a ridiculous amount of money (which he couldn’t) and it compounded somehow through fees for having to go to probation meetings.  His friend’s dad took care of his son who also got probation.  He told me that he gets followed around in stores all the time. I asked him if he knew that he looked like a thug and he laughed and said “Cause I am”.

Dang. I guess you can’t see as good as it gets from so close.

 

 
 
diding
 
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diding
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23 June 2020 10:54
 
Jb8989 - 23 June 2020 08:14 AM
diding - 23 June 2020 07:51 AM
Jb8989 - 23 June 2020 06:32 AM
diding - 22 June 2020 11:50 PM
Jb8989 - 22 June 2020 08:21 PM
diding - 22 June 2020 10:06 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 03:19 PM
diding - 16 June 2020 10:56 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 10:42 AM
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Women do it all the time and I’m supportive of them.  When getting on an elevator it’s called “I’ll catch the next one”.
Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

No shade, but spot the thug sounds like an awful name for a game, and probably another reason why I’m glad we have cops who are paid to play it.

Women play this type of game all day when waiting for the elevator.  It’s called “I’ll take the next car”.

I guess you gotta play a little Spot The Thug so you can get to the later rounds of Don’t Get Raped, but you’re trivializing The Gaze with your Prejudicial Parcheesi.

I live in the Ghetto.  Zone 6 ATL. I learned the game a long time ago.  I was taught how to play it by a black kid who I employed to help me do construction.  We were talking about how not to be racist and he said “You can tell who the thugs are.  There! That guy right there”.  Then it became a thing.  He worked with me for several years. He lives in Trestle Tree apts.  Look it up, it’s a rough spot.  He was good at the game.

Lol and Interesting. Any tell tale signs other than the obvious? One thing I learned from The Gaze is that a lot of police suspicion can make young kids living in the bad neighborhoods feel defective, and therefore sometimes act funky even if they’re squeaky clean.

I’ll call my friend T.  T. said, half jokingly, that if someone has dreads or a grill or sagging pants or face tattoos that they might not be a thug, all of those things and they definitely were.  T. loved to skateboard and he was best friends with a white kid whose father I played tennis with.  That’s how I met T. He told me that he grew up around thugs.  His dad had him “slinging’ boy” (selling heroin) when he was 10.  When he knocked his girlfriend up I told him he should get a full time job because my work is spotty.  It’s funny because about a month before he got her pregnant, I was telling him about the Brookings Institute’s finding which stated that 80% of people can avoid poverty by doing three things: Finish High School, Get a full time job, and Don’t have kids until you’re married. I saw him right before the ‘Rona hit. He swung by my birthday party in March and he had gotten his GED, a full time job, a haircut, and his pants fit.  I guess he’s about 22 now. 

He went to visit his white friend at college once and they were doing some dumb shit and got caught shoplifting.  He told me that the cops cuffed him and his friend but not the white girls they were with. He ended up getting probation in some kind of plea but he had to pay a ridiculous amount of money (which he couldn’t) and it compounded somehow through fees for having to go to probation meetings.  His friend’s dad took care of his son who also got probation.  He told me that he gets followed around in stores all the time. I asked him if he knew that he looked like a thug and he laughed and said “Cause I am”.

Dang. I guess you can’t see as good as it gets from so close.

I grew up in the Snow White suburbs.  I never knew any people like T. before. Now I know many people like him. That’s why it’s so funny to me when I see white people, SJW types (mostly women), talking about “black problems”.  It’s like they’re talking about pets.  (I’ll let you in on a little secret, the black people know they are being treated like pets.  They won’t let on as long as whites keep washing their feet). We have an app called Nextdoor. It’s like a community bulletin board that has gone bat shit woke.  Some things they say on there are absolutely laughable.

 
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Jb8989
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23 June 2020 11:52
 
diding - 23 June 2020 10:54 AM
Jb8989 - 23 June 2020 08:14 AM
diding - 23 June 2020 07:51 AM
Jb8989 - 23 June 2020 06:32 AM
diding - 22 June 2020 11:50 PM
Jb8989 - 22 June 2020 08:21 PM
diding - 22 June 2020 10:06 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 03:19 PM
diding - 16 June 2020 10:56 AM
Jb8989 - 16 June 2020 10:42 AM
diding - 16 June 2020 08:25 AM
Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Women do it all the time and I’m supportive of them.  When getting on an elevator it’s called “I’ll catch the next one”.
Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

No shade, but spot the thug sounds like an awful name for a game, and probably another reason why I’m glad we have cops who are paid to play it.

Women play this type of game all day when waiting for the elevator.  It’s called “I’ll take the next car”.

I guess you gotta play a little Spot The Thug so you can get to the later rounds of Don’t Get Raped, but you’re trivializing The Gaze with your Prejudicial Parcheesi.

I live in the Ghetto.  Zone 6 ATL. I learned the game a long time ago.  I was taught how to play it by a black kid who I employed to help me do construction.  We were talking about how not to be racist and he said “You can tell who the thugs are.  There! That guy right there”.  Then it became a thing.  He worked with me for several years. He lives in Trestle Tree apts.  Look it up, it’s a rough spot.  He was good at the game.

Lol and Interesting. Any tell tale signs other than the obvious? One thing I learned from The Gaze is that a lot of police suspicion can make young kids living in the bad neighborhoods feel defective, and therefore sometimes act funky even if they’re squeaky clean.

I’ll call my friend T.  T. said, half jokingly, that if someone has dreads or a grill or sagging pants or face tattoos that they might not be a thug, all of those things and they definitely were.  T. loved to skateboard and he was best friends with a white kid whose father I played tennis with.  That’s how I met T. He told me that he grew up around thugs.  His dad had him “slinging’ boy” (selling heroin) when he was 10.  When he knocked his girlfriend up I told him he should get a full time job because my work is spotty.  It’s funny because about a month before he got her pregnant, I was telling him about the Brookings Institute’s finding which stated that 80% of people can avoid poverty by doing three things: Finish High School, Get a full time job, and Don’t have kids until you’re married. I saw him right before the ‘Rona hit. He swung by my birthday party in March and he had gotten his GED, a full time job, a haircut, and his pants fit.  I guess he’s about 22 now. 

He went to visit his white friend at college once and they were doing some dumb shit and got caught shoplifting.  He told me that the cops cuffed him and his friend but not the white girls they were with. He ended up getting probation in some kind of plea but he had to pay a ridiculous amount of money (which he couldn’t) and it compounded somehow through fees for having to go to probation meetings.  His friend’s dad took care of his son who also got probation.  He told me that he gets followed around in stores all the time. I asked him if he knew that he looked like a thug and he laughed and said “Cause I am”.

Dang. I guess you can’t see as good as it gets from so close.

I grew up in the Snow White suburbs.  I never knew any people like T. before. Now I know many people like him. That’s why it’s so funny to me when I see white people, SJW types (mostly women), talking about “black problems”.  It’s like they’re talking about pets.  (I’ll let you in on a little secret, the black people know they are being treated like pets.  They won’t let on as long as whites keep washing their feet). We have an app called Nextdoor. It’s like a community bulletin board that has gone bat shit woke.  Some things they say on there are absolutely laughable.

Again, no shade, but that’s called a double whammy overgeneralization; first of white chicks and then a little later on all black people. Also I have some egg on my face because I’m sort of a social justice warrior who kind of knows what you mean about some snowflakes, but the way you said it made me puke a little in my mouth.

 
 
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23 June 2020 12:28
 
Jb8989 - 23 June 2020 11:52 AM
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Jb8989 - 14 June 2020 01:02 PM

The ghetto gaze is when the reality that there’s a utilitarian value to having a higher police presence in neighborhoods with more criminal behavior meets the argument that making suspicion omnipresent has a compounding negative psychological return on the non-criminals living there.

In 2001 i got on a plane to Vegas for a wedding not long after 9/11.  Boarding in front of me were two young Middle Eastern men with backpacks.  Was I wrong to plan to stab them in the neck with a pen if I had to?  Did they have to deal with “gaze”?  Probably.  Did it make their flight uncomfortable?  Probably.  My flight was uncomfortable, too.

Women do it all the time and I’m supportive of them.  When getting on an elevator it’s called “I’ll catch the next one”.
Maybe discomfort is the price we pay for shock. “What ifs” that run amok for any other day’s no good reason.

Young black men I know say they feel like people are looking at them with suspicion, but when we ride around together and play the “Spot the Thug” game, we usually pick out the same people.  I do this with older black friends and their range of “thuggy” is even bigger than mine.  My black cop friend is even more selective.

No shade, but spot the thug sounds like an awful name for a game, and probably another reason why I’m glad we have cops who are paid to play it.

Women play this type of game all day when waiting for the elevator.  It’s called “I’ll take the next car”.

I guess you gotta play a little Spot The Thug so you can get to the later rounds of Don’t Get Raped, but you’re trivializing The Gaze with your Prejudicial Parcheesi.

I live in the Ghetto.  Zone 6 ATL. I learned the game a long time ago.  I was taught how to play it by a black kid who I employed to help me do construction.  We were talking about how not to be racist and he said “You can tell who the thugs are.  There! That guy right there”.  Then it became a thing.  He worked with me for several years. He lives in Trestle Tree apts.  Look it up, it’s a rough spot.  He was good at the game.

Lol and Interesting. Any tell tale signs other than the obvious? One thing I learned from The Gaze is that a lot of police suspicion can make young kids living in the bad neighborhoods feel defective, and therefore sometimes act funky even if they’re squeaky clean.

I’ll call my friend T.  T. said, half jokingly, that if someone has dreads or a grill or sagging pants or face tattoos that they might not be a thug, all of those things and they definitely were.  T. loved to skateboard and he was best friends with a white kid whose father I played tennis with.  That’s how I met T. He told me that he grew up around thugs.  His dad had him “slinging’ boy” (selling heroin) when he was 10.  When he knocked his girlfriend up I told him he should get a full time job because my work is spotty.  It’s funny because about a month before he got her pregnant, I was telling him about the Brookings Institute’s finding which stated that 80% of people can avoid poverty by doing three things: Finish High School, Get a full time job, and Don’t have kids until you’re married. I saw him right before the ‘Rona hit. He swung by my birthday party in March and he had gotten his GED, a full time job, a haircut, and his pants fit.  I guess he’s about 22 now. 

He went to visit his white friend at college once and they were doing some dumb shit and got caught shoplifting.  He told me that the cops cuffed him and his friend but not the white girls they were with. He ended up getting probation in some kind of plea but he had to pay a ridiculous amount of money (which he couldn’t) and it compounded somehow through fees for having to go to probation meetings.  His friend’s dad took care of his son who also got probation.  He told me that he gets followed around in stores all the time. I asked him if he knew that he looked like a thug and he laughed and said “Cause I am”.

Dang. I guess you can’t see as good as it gets from so close.

I grew up in the Snow White suburbs.  I never knew any people like T. before. Now I know many people like him. That’s why it’s so funny to me when I see white people, SJW types (mostly women), talking about “black problems”.  It’s like they’re talking about pets.  (I’ll let you in on a little secret, the black people know they are being treated like pets.  They won’t let on as long as whites keep washing their feet). We have an app called Nextdoor. It’s like a community bulletin board that has gone bat shit woke.  Some things they say on there are absolutely laughable.

Again, no shade, but that’s called a double whammy overgeneralization; first of white chicks and then a little later on all black people. Also I have some egg on my face because I’m sort of a social justice warrior who kind of knows what you mean about some snowflakes, but the way you said it made me puke a little in my mouth.

As far as the white chicks go, many of them post pictures of themselves, and when I said “black people” it was based on the black friends I have, which has equaled in number all other races that I’m friends with.  I have a friend who is an agitator. He gets all “Black Blocked out” and throws bricks.  He’s hung out with DeRay.  He was telling me about when he was at Occupy and he was offered lodging by an old white woman who just “loved to touch his hair”.  I asked him what he did and he said “I slept in her bed and ate her food”.  So funny….