How do we cross-pollinate Climate Justice and Racial Equality??

 
PermieMan
 
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PermieMan
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26 June 2020 11:08
 

So I wrote this theory paper on Community Land Trusts and Sustainable Localism not giving any credence in the theory to Climate Justice.  However, this article I found by Googling ‘Climate Change and Racism’ is very compelling and reiterates the thesis of my paper.  (Which I will also include with this post for those who might be interested in reading it for the sake of discussion.)
Do you agree or disagree that Climate Justice is interrelated to Racial Equality and a beginning to disseminating ‘white priviledge’?

https://e360.yale.edu/features/unequal-impact-the-deep-links-between-inequality-and-climate-change

How Community Land Trusts are the Cornerstones to Solving the Affordable Housing Crisis and Localism’s Proactive Sustainable Response to Climate Change.
By:  Jon T. Hanzen

“A community is the mental and spiritual condition of knowing that a place is shared, and that the people who share the place define and limit the possibilities of each other’s lives.”  -Wendell Berry
If the onset of climate change is a sociological problem stemming from societies natural resource dependency then promoting climate change mitigation through sustainable Localism is an interdependent solution.  Both the Sociological and Ecological Environments can be effectively managed with the proactive stewardship of citizens endemic to a particular region.  Commercial sponsorship and Governmental support produce a Win Win scenario. 
Community Land Trusts have sociological relevance.  And monetary gain is not it’s raison d’etre.  A C.L.T. is a viable solution to the current affordable housing crisis.  A C.LT.’s presence as a non-profit organization in the business world represents affluence and could be considered a proactive force for the balance of income disparity because of the deeper sociological wealth that it is capable of generating.  For instance; if all forms of social mobility were considered to be a deeper form of wealth including benefits pertaining to social services then solving the affordable housing crisis using C.L.T. ‘s would be a deeper form of sociological wealth as there are multiple benefits to improve the residents quality of life as a result.
C.L.T. ‘s offer lower, middle and upper income individuals opportunities of promoting community values under the umbrella of ‘Sustainable Localism’ garnered from the non-profit organization in which they live.  Not only do C.L.T.’s offer residents a tax haven and subsidies but adopting community values enables involved community members and residents to ascertain new skills in becoming personally and financially independent while functioning interdependently among members of the C.L.T. for building support systems which enhance their quality of life.
As a business entity, a C.L.T. empowers by way of cross-pollination.  As citizens, organizations, businesses, companies and municipalities collaborate in proactivism they end up supporting the ‘Sustainable development of Localism’.
Volunteerism is synergistic in Society.  “Volunteerism enables individuals to work together shaping collective opportunities for dealing with risk and connecting individuals and communities with wider systems of support…Volunteerism as a universal social behavior is therefore a critical resource for community resilience.”  -The United Nations ‘State of the World’s Volunteerism Report’ 2019.
Learning social accountability and skills for climate change mitigation is invaluable.  People such as New Millennials, who normally couldn’t qualify for home ownership anywhere in cities like Seattle, can qualify through a C.L.T.’s often subsidized indefinite land lease to only build or purchase a home.  This opens up the possibility of being mortgage free in 10 years or less.  In theory, it breaks the archaic mold of recycling Colonialism through piercing an inflated market bubble based on gentrification and a market economy swimming in debt.  And debt fragilizes the economy.
C.L.T.’s can offer members and residents the opportunity to start affiliated sustainable small businesses which can further garner support for themselves and the community.  Finance and accounting classes may be offered through the C.L.T. as well as other various programs and volunteer projects.  For instance; forming an official community garden on an adjacent vacant lot that the C.L.T. purchased to discourage gentrification or increase property value.  The garden then becomes the opportunity to reduce food costs by providing direct access to an unrefined organic whole foods diet.  When members attend associated meetings to adhere to bylaws it strengthens commitment to the C.L.T. and helps to form bonds with others, deepening a sense of belonging.  Learning to garden provides free education for families and develops skills in Hands-On Environmentalism for Climate Change mitigation in the future.  This type of multi-generational, multi-ethinic and gender neutral approach evokes social mobility which in turn promotes robust Localism.
Childcare, petcare, house-sitting, a tool library and active neighborhood watch programs, in a C.L.T., all provide stability, safety and security to members and residents while fostering maturity and responsibility within the community at large. 
There are a myriad of on-going volunteer projects that C.L.T. ‘s can lead or co-lead with business sponsors and or the municipality of it’s locale.  Collaborative volunteer projects directly serve the public and are often eligible for funding and grants.  For example, a spring clean-up project in neighborhoods, parks or along roadways is considered as ‘community enhancement’ and encouraged on Municipal, State and Federal levels.
  C.L.T. members becoming vendors at local farmers markets might contribute by selling produce.  The markets also serve as a nexus for cultural wealth to the larger community.  The customers, in turn, offer monetary and social support from practicing ethical consumerism.  This is a ‘sustainable local economy.’ 
When citizens of communities are working together to achieve the common goal of stewarding both the sociological and the ecological environment, a sustainable society of the future can be achieved and then reflected by policy in a changing Capitalist to Socialist system.  In Budhist communities, this is known as Right Livelihood.  A well known tribal word in South Africa which also describes this kind of ‘community values’ is Ubuntu.  It literally translates as; ‘i am YOU and you are WE.’ 
  Stewardship in a C.L.T. is a working model for achieving common goals.  This type of cooperativism has the intention of developing a higher quality of life not only for the people at large but for the ecological environment as well [like in permaculture design principles]. 
  In Conclusion C.L.T.’s offer a solution to not only the affordable housing crisis as a viable pathway to home ownership, but can serve as cornerstones to creating ‘sustainable local economies’.  Robust localism develops as the result of a C.L.T.’s proactive response in Volunteerism and Cooperativism both within the C.L.T. and the greater community.  This is also known as ‘community wealth building’.  Monetary and social support generated out of conscious consumerism and ‘Sustainable Localism’ are the fundamental building blocks in Climate Change mitigation.

 
 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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27 June 2020 07:58
 

As a white guy, I’m told I cannot have an opinion on this, but here goes anyway:

I would agree that the issues of climate change, the oligarchy, and racism are heavily intertwined, and that they cannot really be solved independently of each other.

I also think that we need to rebuild our society to be “anti-fragile”, and that that includes a massive shift towards decentralization.

 
 
PermieMan
 
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27 June 2020 08:03
 

Awesome.  However what comes after and an anti-fragile society is a robust one.  (Anti-fragility is actually dependent upon robustness or it means it’s own demise.)  Independence within interdependence is Conscious Consumerism being proactive with Ethical Consumerism.  That is Socialism for me.  I want to see high level citizenship and I don’t think Capitalism can take us there.  What’s the point of discussing if there is no action?

[ Edited: 28 June 2020 09:29 by PermieMan]
 
 
icehorse
 
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27 June 2020 08:09
 
PermieMan - 27 June 2020 08:03 AM

Awesome.  However what comes after and an anti-fragile society is a robust one.  (Anti-fragility is actually dependent upon robustness or it means it’s own demise.)  Independence within interdependence is Conscious Consumerism being proactive with Ethical Consumerism.  That is Socialism for me as a Humanist and Humanitarian.  I want to see high level citizenship and I don’t think Capitalism can take us there.  What the point of discussing if there is action?

I await your definition of socialism wink

 
 
Jb8989
 
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27 June 2020 09:58
 

Interesting.

Edit: I’d add the need for a strong milieu mindset.

[ Edited: 27 June 2020 11:31 by Jb8989]
 
 
PermieMan
 
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28 June 2020 09:36
 

There is no classic Socialism because in reference to Capitalism it is post-modern.  Point being, of this post, is that Climate Justice isn’t the same as Climate activism.  And seeing both the definitive issue as well as how issues are interconnected, in a modern era, is the beginning of eradicating issues together.

 
 
icehorse
 
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28 June 2020 09:44
 
PermieMan - 28 June 2020 09:36 AM

There is no classic Socialism because in reference to Capitalism it is post-modern.  Point being, of this post, is that Climate Justice isn’t the same as Climate activism.  And seeing both the definitive issue as well as how issues are interconnected, in a modern era, is the beginning of eradicating issues together.

I’m asking about your definition of socialism ONLY because you brought it up. If it’s not an essential aspect of the OP, that’s okay. You just have to clarify this point.

 
 
Brick Bungalow
 
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28 June 2020 13:32
 

I don’t have a grand strategy but I believe a few things are generally helpful on both fronts: More specifically I think the lack of the following can be correlated with both social ills.

*An emphasis on charitable and goal oriented conversation that doesn’t bite down on every opportunity to contradict or shame.
*Less recourse to tired, polarizing rhetoric about ‘isms’. More focus on concepts and strategies.
*A unified cultural ethic that values life and quality of life.
(I think universal healthcare is an inescapable conclusion here. Even if we don’t care for people for moral reasons it makes no economic sense to let the people who do essential tasks get sick and die from preventable diseases. We maintain bridges. Why not bridge workers?)
*Respect for science and for sound methods that accord with science. 
*An honest accounting of history and the persisting conditions that emanate from the crimes of history AND the events occuring now that are the same.
*A willingness to cooperate on one thing even when we cannot agree about all things.

 
weird buffalo
 
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30 June 2020 18:47
 

I don’t necessarily agree with everything Amartya Sen has to say, but his 1999 book Development as Freedom makes an interesting and useful jumping off point.  Sen’s argument is that most national economies/political entities are too focused on the generation of wealth as a marker of development, when in reality we should be focusing on the increase in freedom when measuring development.

An example I can think of would be the Xayaburi dam in Laos.  The dam was recently completed, and is one of the major dams on the Mekong River, which is seriously being threatened.  The dam was constructed in partnership with the Energy Generating Authority of Thailand.  It was built by a Thai construction company, is owned by that company, and sells all of its power to Thailand.  All arbitration and legal disputes about the dam have to be conducted in Thai courts in Bangkok.  The Thai company pays an export fee to the government of Laos.

Economically, the dam is beneficial to manufacturers in Thailand, with a portion going to the Laos government.  We don’t know how much Laos gets, as those aspects of the deal are not public (the above structure between the dam and EGAT are public though, and if the dam ever defaults on energy provided, the Thai government can essentially take it over).  The people who used to live along the river in the effected area have been completely displaced.  The government spent a pittance to relocate them, and then left them to fend for themselves.  They weren’t included in the decision making process, they don’t benefit from the dam itself, and have essentially had their rights sold to a foreign country, where they don’t have the money to afford representation and don’t even speak the language.

Sen’s book was written well before this, but it essentially predicts the outcome of these villagers being left in poverty.  The dam was very expensive, and will generate large amounts of electricity which will create economic opportunity in Thailand, but the people of Laos will effectively see none of it.  Because the people of Laos have little to no say in their government, there is no transparency, and they do not have the tools to better themselves.

Instead, if the villagers were able to make decisions for themselves they could still provide for themselves with agriculture and fishing, or make the choice to produce electricity.  An increase in freedom and political participation would result in a more stable economy that would have a greater potential of growing, but more importantly it would result overall in better lives for them.

I think some of his points get a little too close to “pull themselves up by their bootstraps,” but overall I think his work is good in challenging us to rethink what development would actually look like.  If you’re a fan of Hayek, you might actually find a lot you really like in there.

 
PermieMan
 
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01 July 2020 06:59
 

The sincere feedback is sincerely appreciated.  Perhaps the concern for growing oppression is at the heart of this post?  My hypothesis attempts to elucidate a new sociological paradigm for up and coming generations by using a frame of reference which is closer to home for them, juxtaposed to merely presenting a new sociological theory.

 
 
icehorse
 
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01 July 2020 07:17
 

The sad reality is that there will always be immoral people in the world. People who are happy to accumulate material possessions at the expense of others. Parasites on society. So we need checks and balances to rein these folks in. Thinking of the dam story, I’ve always liked the idea that people in charge of altering the environment should be required to live “downstream” of their activities. They ought to be required to drink from the same wells as the villagers, and eat the same food as the villagers, and so on.

 
 
PermieMan
 
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01 July 2020 10:09
 

yes sure I agree.  But I am not convinced that when good people are in power wielding the capabilities of technology that there isn’t some yet unrealized potential.  Like transcendence of some archaic evil ways of humanity.

 
 
icehorse
 
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01 July 2020 10:14
 
PermieMan - 01 July 2020 10:09 AM

yes sure I agree.  But I am not convinced that when good people are in power wielding the capabilities of technology that there isn’t some yet unrealized potential.  Like transcendence of some archaic evil ways of humanity.

If you’re not a bot, then I apologize, but you’re sounding more and more like a bot.

 
 
PermieMan
 
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01 July 2020 10:22
 

What do you want to hear.  Yes bad people do bad things.  But not all men are created equal.  So we have to struggle and strive for better even when the majority do not.  The masses do not want the truth.  And it is ever becoming more prevalent in our world.  So ethics is the answer for the up and coming generations.  And becoming highly average is more and more possible for those who go after it.