Qoo-Qoo Qandidates

 
Cheshire Cat
 
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Cheshire Cat
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18 July 2020 14:29
 

There is a supposed curse, allegedly of Chinese origin, which says: “May you live in interesting times.”

Well, we currently live in interesting times.

A global pandemic has appeared, devastating the the entire globe and the United States in particular. Imminent economic collapse, similar in magnitude to the Great Depression, seems to be awaiting us just around the corner. Anxiety and depression are touching the lives of a third or more of all Americans. The US has an incompetent reality TV host as president, who has abdicated responsibility toward ending the pandemic, and may refuse to step down if he loses the presidential election in November.

During such times, those who were already teetering on the edge of losing their sanity, can fall over the cliff and may develop Conspiracy Theory Disorder:
“According to the researchers, ‘Fear and anxiety were reported as positive predictors of conspiracy beliefs. As people are anxious, fear a threatening situation, or have low perceived feelings of control over situations, they tend to conspiracies.’ This was found to be especially true in people who have a need to exert control over their environment — they like the feeling of being in control at all times.
Conspiracy theories are a way of making sense out of events that oftentimes, at least initially, seem to make little sense.

https://tinyurl.com/yyt27oqn

The latest bit of conspiracy theory mental derangement is the rise of QAnon, a weird mash-up of far-right paranoia, Trump worship, and Christian zealotry.

https://tinyurl.com/ybuv4wwk

Recently, I read an article in the New York Times entitled: “The QAnon Candidates Are Here. Trump Has Paved Their Way.” Yes, that’s right, QAnon candidates are running for public office. Below are a few quotes from the article.

All of the candidates, though, present a fresh headache for Republican leaders. They were already struggling to distance the party from conspiracy theories steeped in racist and anti-Semitic messaging. Now they must contend with candidates whose online beliefs have inspired real-world violence, including the killing of a mob boss.

It is a development that threatens to further alienate the kinds of traditional Republican voters who typically care about lowering taxes, not chasing imaginary Satanists from the government. Democrats are eager to pounce.

Yet Republican leaders also cannot afford to turn off voters who share those conspiratorial views if they hope to retain the Senate and retake the House. So while the party has publicly sought to keep its distance from most QAnon candidates, campaign finance filings show that some have clearly won its tacit backing.

In many instances, they sought to spread a core tenet of the QAnon conspiracy: that Mr. Trump, backed by the military, ran for office to save Americans from a so-called deep state filled with child-abusing, devil-worshiping bureaucrats. Backing the president’s enemies are prominent Democrats who, in some telling, extract hormones from children’s blood.

The president, for his part, has repeatedly retweeted QAnon supporters, and cheered on candidates who openly support the conspiracy theory, such as Ms. Greene of Georgia.

No matter how many of the candidates win, their mere presence on the political scene is helping to further spread a conspiracy that, at its core, sees the government as a dangerous enemy.

https://tinyurl.com/yylqgryk

Yes, interesting times, indeed.

 

[ Edited: 18 July 2020 14:47 by Cheshire Cat]
 
 
MrRon
 
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MrRon
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19 July 2020 06:12
 

Welcome to AmeriQA.

Ron

 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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19 July 2020 07:28
 

Thank goodness we have a thoughtful and logical electorate!

 
 
Brick Bungalow
 
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Brick Bungalow
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19 July 2020 09:14
 

Propping up poorly spoken and relatively ignorant candidates as a strategic gesture toward voters who prefer them isn’t new. But the Trump era is the first time I’ve personally encountered voters who feel in on the joke. That is to say, people who realize the candidate is incompetent but vote for them anyway because they feel they will get some sort of strategic advantage. Or they simply have a desire to tear the system down.

It’s a dismal spectacle.

 
MrRon
 
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19 July 2020 10:58
 
Brick Bungalow - 19 July 2020 09:14 AM

Propping up poorly spoken and relatively ignorant candidates as a strategic gesture toward voters who prefer them isn’t new. But the Trump era is the first time I’ve personally encountered voters who feel in on the joke. That is to say, people who realize the candidate is incompetent but vote for them anyway because they feel they will get some sort of strategic advantage. Or they simply have a desire to tear the system down.

It’s a dismal spectacle.

I’m not sure how prevalent the “I know he’s incompetent but I’ll vote for him anyway” Trump voter is. In my experience, all the Trump voters that I know actually believe that he IS competent but has been/is misrepresented by the “lamestream” media. The common criticism I’ve heard of Trump from Trump supporters is that he talks/tweets too much and he should just shut his mouth and do his job. The translation being that although they agree with Trump’s ideology/policies/actions, his verbalizing and openly sparring with others is what gets him in trouble. Better to do his dirty deeds without drawing so much attention. So they silently cheer him on while giving the impression of being critical of him.

Ron

 
unsmoked
 
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unsmoked
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19 July 2020 11:54
 
MrRon - 19 July 2020 10:58 AM
Brick Bungalow - 19 July 2020 09:14 AM

Propping up poorly spoken and relatively ignorant candidates as a strategic gesture toward voters who prefer them isn’t new. But the Trump era is the first time I’ve personally encountered voters who feel in on the joke. That is to say, people who realize the candidate is incompetent but vote for them anyway because they feel they will get some sort of strategic advantage. Or they simply have a desire to tear the system down.

It’s a dismal spectacle.

I’m not sure how prevalent the “I know he’s incompetent but I’ll vote for him anyway” Trump voter is. In my experience, all the Trump voters that I know actually believe that he IS competent but has been/is misrepresented by the “lamestream” media. The common criticism I’ve heard of Trump from Trump supporters is that he talks/tweets too much and he should just shut his mouth and do his job. The translation being that although they agree with Trump’s ideology/policies/actions, his verbalizing and openly sparring with others is what gets him in trouble. Better to do his dirty deeds without drawing so much attention. So they silently cheer him on while giving the impression of being critical of him.

Ron

Agree

However, if it seems certain that Trump will lose in November, will Romney throw his hat in the ring?  https://www.sltrib.com/opinion/commentary/2020/03/05/benjamin-dieterle-how/

 
 
icehorse
 
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icehorse
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19 July 2020 18:47
 

brick:

Or they simply have a desire to tear the system down.

I fear too many of them want to tear the system down with no understanding at all of how flippin miserable their lives would become if they succeeded.

 
 
Brick Bungalow
 
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Brick Bungalow
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20 July 2020 12:18
 
MrRon - 19 July 2020 10:58 AM
Brick Bungalow - 19 July 2020 09:14 AM

Propping up poorly spoken and relatively ignorant candidates as a strategic gesture toward voters who prefer them isn’t new. But the Trump era is the first time I’ve personally encountered voters who feel in on the joke. That is to say, people who realize the candidate is incompetent but vote for them anyway because they feel they will get some sort of strategic advantage. Or they simply have a desire to tear the system down.

It’s a dismal spectacle.

I’m not sure how prevalent the “I know he’s incompetent but I’ll vote for him anyway” Trump voter is. In my experience, all the Trump voters that I know actually believe that he IS competent but has been/is misrepresented by the “lamestream” media. The common criticism I’ve heard of Trump from Trump supporters is that he talks/tweets too much and he should just shut his mouth and do his job. The translation being that although they agree with Trump’s ideology/policies/actions, his verbalizing and openly sparring with others is what gets him in trouble. Better to do his dirty deeds without drawing so much attention. So they silently cheer him on while giving the impression of being critical of him.

Ron

I don’t know what segment this perspective represents precisely but I believe its non trivial given the subscriber numbers on certain alt right pages. The demographic here is mostly white males currently attending college. Whatever the size of this voting block was I think it was disproportionately persuasive because of its ability to deploy internet counter intelligence. These are the folks largely responsible for the circulation of conspiracy theories like Pizzagate. And for the effective campaign to broad brush almost all broadcast journalism as ‘fake news’. On Dons cue of course.