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Mr. Biden

 
EN
 
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EN
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13 January 2021 07:07
 

I have to say that I have been quite impressed with Mr. Biden throughout this entire affair.  His calm demeanor conveys an inner confidence and assurance.  Perhaps it’s a result of all the personal tragedy and suffering he has been through, or as a result of his age and vast experience, or his personal psychological makeup. It’s probably all three combined, with help and support from his equally calm wife, Dr. Jill.  In any event, at the times when I was most prone to really worry (when the Electoral College met, when Congress convened, when the insurrection occurred), he has been “steady as she goes.”  To me that conveys the message that everything is going to be alright. It’s refreshing for a leader to have that kind of attitude. I so look forward to January 20.

 
weird buffalo
 
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weird buffalo
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13 January 2021 07:43
 

The other thing that comforts me is his willingness to rely on the expertise of others.  And I don’t just mean trusting anyone and everyone, but specifically trusting known experts in their field.

In a related note, he’s chosen William Burns to head the CIA.  He worked at the State Department for 33 years, including serving as ambassador to Jordan and Russia, and the deputy secretary.  He retired in 2014 to work at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.  It will be the first time the CIA is run by someone who is not a former intelligence or military officer.  It really makes me think that Biden will be trying very hard to shift US foreign policy.

 
bigredfutbol
 
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bigredfutbol
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13 January 2021 08:38
 
weird buffalo - 13 January 2021 07:43 AM

It really makes me think that Biden will be trying very hard to shift US foreign policy.

There are rumblings in the Balkan-o-sphere that the Biden administration might push for a long-overdue revision of the Dayton constitution in Bosnia. That would be quite welcome.

 
 
EN
 
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13 January 2021 08:39
 

Lord knows, he has a lot to do to repair the damage Trump did to our foreign policy and intelligence communities.  I’m hoping he gets his picks for Cabinet positions confirmed quickly (even if the impeachment is still ongoing) so he can get to work.

 
bigredfutbol
 
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bigredfutbol
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13 January 2021 08:40
 

Yeah, Biden really has risen to this moment. He’s making appointment and cabinet choices that reflect the best kind of leadership. He seems serious, and also not driven by ego.

 
 
bigredfutbol
 
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bigredfutbol
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13 January 2021 09:19
 
EN - 13 January 2021 08:39 AM

Lord knows, he has a lot to do to repair the damage Trump did to our foreign policy and intelligence communities.  I’m hoping he gets his picks for Cabinet positions confirmed quickly (even if the impeachment is still ongoing) so he can get to work.

Co-signed.

 
 
Jan_CAN
 
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Jan_CAN
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13 January 2021 09:45
 
EN - 13 January 2021 07:07 AM

I have to say that I have been quite impressed with Mr. Biden throughout this entire affair.  His calm demeanor conveys an inner confidence and assurance.  Perhaps it’s a result of all the personal tragedy and suffering he has been through, or as a result of his age and vast experience, or his personal psychological makeup. It’s probably all three combined, with help and support from his equally calm wife, Dr. Jill.  In any event, at the times when I was most prone to really worry (when the Electoral College met, when Congress convened, when the insurrection occurred), he has been “steady as she goes.”  To me that conveys the message that everything is going to be alright. It’s refreshing for a leader to have that kind of attitude. I so look forward to January 20.

I agree.

When Biden was first chosen as leader of his party, I was unsure if he was the best choice – too old and part of an imperfect past, not progressive enough in regards to issues like health care.  But I’ve changed my mind and think he may be exactly what America needs right now.  His experience and relationships will help him put the right people in essential positions.  His composure and determination should encourage calm and confidence.  His dignity and empathy will inspire.

 

 
 
Twissel
 
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13 January 2021 10:17
 

Unlike 45, Biden’s ego doesn’t require him to micromanage everything.

And, he has a team of extremely motivated and competent people.

 
 
Skipshot
 
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13 January 2021 11:30
 
EN - 13 January 2021 08:39 AM

Lord knows, he has a lot to do to repair the damage Trump did. . .

This is a common theme in politics for the last 20 years.  Republicans take power and mess up, and leave the mess for a Democrat to fix.  Then once it’s fixed, Republicans take power and mess it up again.  Sort of like a younger me and overdoing it with a bottle of booze, then with a ferocious hangover begging never to drink like that again, only to repeat it.  At least I took the blame for my actions.

 
bigredfutbol
 
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13 January 2021 11:59
 
Skipshot - 13 January 2021 11:30 AM
EN - 13 January 2021 08:39 AM

Lord knows, he has a lot to do to repair the damage Trump did. . .

This is a common theme in politics for the last 20 years.  Republicans take power and mess up, and leave the mess for a Democrat to fix.  Then once it’s fixed, Republicans take power and mess it up again.  Sort of like a younger me and overdoing it with a bottle of booze, then with a ferocious hangover begging never to drink like that again, only to repeat it.  At least I took the blame for my actions.

I’d argue you can go back a lot further than 20 years. Clinton’s centrism was certainly partly about acquiescing to the post-Reagan ideological landscape, trying to find a way for liberalism to stop playing defense, and make the party competitive again; but it was also partly about restoring some fiscal sanity after over a decade of budget-busting, deficit-increasing “supply side economics”.

 

 
 
Jefe
 
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13 January 2021 12:28
 
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 11:59 AM
Skipshot - 13 January 2021 11:30 AM
EN - 13 January 2021 08:39 AM

Lord knows, he has a lot to do to repair the damage Trump did. . .

This is a common theme in politics for the last 20 years.  Republicans take power and mess up, and leave the mess for a Democrat to fix.  Then once it’s fixed, Republicans take power and mess it up again.  Sort of like a younger me and overdoing it with a bottle of booze, then with a ferocious hangover begging never to drink like that again, only to repeat it.  At least I took the blame for my actions.

I’d argue you can go back a lot further than 20 years. Clinton’s centrism was certainly partly about acquiescing to the post-Reagan ideological landscape, trying to find a way for liberalism to stop playing defense, and make the party competitive again; but it was also partly about restoring some fiscal sanity after over a decade of budget-busting, deficit-increasing “supply side economics”.

 

Yup.  It’s kind of a cycle that your 4-year, 2 term leadership kinda breeds.
Fixing the parts one’s predecessor has broken is a full-time job, and detracts from any long-view projects.

 
 
bigredfutbol
 
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bigredfutbol
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13 January 2021 12:49
 
Jefe - 13 January 2021 12:28 PM
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 11:59 AM
Skipshot - 13 January 2021 11:30 AM
EN - 13 January 2021 08:39 AM

Lord knows, he has a lot to do to repair the damage Trump did. . .

This is a common theme in politics for the last 20 years.  Republicans take power and mess up, and leave the mess for a Democrat to fix.  Then once it’s fixed, Republicans take power and mess it up again.  Sort of like a younger me and overdoing it with a bottle of booze, then with a ferocious hangover begging never to drink like that again, only to repeat it.  At least I took the blame for my actions.

I’d argue you can go back a lot further than 20 years. Clinton’s centrism was certainly partly about acquiescing to the post-Reagan ideological landscape, trying to find a way for liberalism to stop playing defense, and make the party competitive again; but it was also partly about restoring some fiscal sanity after over a decade of budget-busting, deficit-increasing “supply side economics”.

 

Yup.  It’s kind of a cycle that your 4-year, 2 term leadership kinda breeds.
Fixing the parts one’s predecessor has broken is a full-time job, and detracts from any long-view projects.

What did Clinton or Obama break?

 
 
Jefe
 
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13 January 2021 12:55
 
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 12:49 PM
Jefe - 13 January 2021 12:28 PM
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 11:59 AM
Skipshot - 13 January 2021 11:30 AM
EN - 13 January 2021 08:39 AM

Lord knows, he has a lot to do to repair the damage Trump did. . .

This is a common theme in politics for the last 20 years.  Republicans take power and mess up, and leave the mess for a Democrat to fix.  Then once it’s fixed, Republicans take power and mess it up again.  Sort of like a younger me and overdoing it with a bottle of booze, then with a ferocious hangover begging never to drink like that again, only to repeat it.  At least I took the blame for my actions.

I’d argue you can go back a lot further than 20 years. Clinton’s centrism was certainly partly about acquiescing to the post-Reagan ideological landscape, trying to find a way for liberalism to stop playing defense, and make the party competitive again; but it was also partly about restoring some fiscal sanity after over a decade of budget-busting, deficit-increasing “supply side economics”.

 

Yup.  It’s kind of a cycle that your 4-year, 2 term leadership kinda breeds.
Fixing the parts one’s predecessor has broken is a full-time job, and detracts from any long-view projects.

What did Clinton or Obama break?

It’s not what they broke, but what their successors decided to change after they took power.

Undo the previous admin’s progress….  sorta thing…
You have to admit that Donny had a hate-on for Obama’s improvements.

 

[ Edited: 13 January 2021 13:01 by Jefe]
 
 
bigredfutbol
 
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bigredfutbol
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13 January 2021 13:31
 
Jefe - 13 January 2021 12:55 PM
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 12:49 PM
Jefe - 13 January 2021 12:28 PM
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 11:59 AM
Skipshot - 13 January 2021 11:30 AM
EN - 13 January 2021 08:39 AM

Lord knows, he has a lot to do to repair the damage Trump did. . .

This is a common theme in politics for the last 20 years.  Republicans take power and mess up, and leave the mess for a Democrat to fix.  Then once it’s fixed, Republicans take power and mess it up again.  Sort of like a younger me and overdoing it with a bottle of booze, then with a ferocious hangover begging never to drink like that again, only to repeat it.  At least I took the blame for my actions.

I’d argue you can go back a lot further than 20 years. Clinton’s centrism was certainly partly about acquiescing to the post-Reagan ideological landscape, trying to find a way for liberalism to stop playing defense, and make the party competitive again; but it was also partly about restoring some fiscal sanity after over a decade of budget-busting, deficit-increasing “supply side economics”.

 

Yup.  It’s kind of a cycle that your 4-year, 2 term leadership kinda breeds.
Fixing the parts one’s predecessor has broken is a full-time job, and detracts from any long-view projects.

What did Clinton or Obama break?

It’s not what they broke, but what their successors decided to change after they took power.

Undo the previous admin’s progress….  sorta thing…
You have to admit that Donny had a hate-on for Obama’s improvements.

Of course—but I was just replying to your comment.

 
 
Jefe
 
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Jefe
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13 January 2021 13:47
 
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 01:31 PM
Jefe - 13 January 2021 12:55 PM
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 12:49 PM
Jefe - 13 January 2021 12:28 PM
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 11:59 AM
Skipshot - 13 January 2021 11:30 AM
EN - 13 January 2021 08:39 AM

Lord knows, he has a lot to do to repair the damage Trump did. . .

This is a common theme in politics for the last 20 years.  Republicans take power and mess up, and leave the mess for a Democrat to fix.  Then once it’s fixed, Republicans take power and mess it up again.  Sort of like a younger me and overdoing it with a bottle of booze, then with a ferocious hangover begging never to drink like that again, only to repeat it.  At least I took the blame for my actions.

I’d argue you can go back a lot further than 20 years. Clinton’s centrism was certainly partly about acquiescing to the post-Reagan ideological landscape, trying to find a way for liberalism to stop playing defense, and make the party competitive again; but it was also partly about restoring some fiscal sanity after over a decade of budget-busting, deficit-increasing “supply side economics”.

 

Yup.  It’s kind of a cycle that your 4-year, 2 term leadership kinda breeds.
Fixing the parts one’s predecessor has broken is a full-time job, and detracts from any long-view projects.

What did Clinton or Obama break?

It’s not what they broke, but what their successors decided to change after they took power.

Undo the previous admin’s progress….  sorta thing…
You have to admit that Donny had a hate-on for Obama’s improvements.

Of course—but I was just replying to your comment.

In the pendulum swing between GOP and Dem, the first order of business is to undo as much as possible from a predecessor of a different party.  And take credit for economic gains that hold-over from the previous administration, too.

This makes progress difficult as the first order of business seems to be tear down what came before.

Biden, I think, has an opportunity to side-step this a bit because Donny didn’t do much governing, and accelerating pandemic/public health measures is a constructive exercise.

 
 
bigredfutbol
 
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bigredfutbol
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13 January 2021 14:04
 
Jefe - 13 January 2021 01:47 PM
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 01:31 PM
Jefe - 13 January 2021 12:55 PM
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 12:49 PM
Jefe - 13 January 2021 12:28 PM
bigredfutbol - 13 January 2021 11:59 AM
Skipshot - 13 January 2021 11:30 AM
EN - 13 January 2021 08:39 AM

Lord knows, he has a lot to do to repair the damage Trump did. . .

This is a common theme in politics for the last 20 years.  Republicans take power and mess up, and leave the mess for a Democrat to fix.  Then once it’s fixed, Republicans take power and mess it up again.  Sort of like a younger me and overdoing it with a bottle of booze, then with a ferocious hangover begging never to drink like that again, only to repeat it.  At least I took the blame for my actions.

I’d argue you can go back a lot further than 20 years. Clinton’s centrism was certainly partly about acquiescing to the post-Reagan ideological landscape, trying to find a way for liberalism to stop playing defense, and make the party competitive again; but it was also partly about restoring some fiscal sanity after over a decade of budget-busting, deficit-increasing “supply side economics”.

 

Yup.  It’s kind of a cycle that your 4-year, 2 term leadership kinda breeds.
Fixing the parts one’s predecessor has broken is a full-time job, and detracts from any long-view projects.

What did Clinton or Obama break?

It’s not what they broke, but what their successors decided to change after they took power.

Undo the previous admin’s progress….  sorta thing…
You have to admit that Donny had a hate-on for Obama’s improvements.

Of course—but I was just replying to your comment.

In the pendulum swing between GOP and Dem, the first order of business is to undo as much as possible from a predecessor of a different party.  And take credit for economic gains that hold-over from the previous administration, too.

This makes progress difficult as the first order of business seems to be tear down what came before.

Biden, I think, has an opportunity to side-step this a bit because Donny didn’t do much governing, and accelerating pandemic/public health measures is a constructive exercise.

Sure, but this doesn’t seem to be what Skipshot was talking about.

 
 
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