Coup in Myanmar - how will Republicans react?

 
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01 February 2021 08:28
 

How will Republicans react to the actual military coup in Myanmar when the Myanmar military justified their actions by using Trump’s tactic of massive election fraud?  (Probably that Trump and Myanmar have nothing in common, so comparisons cannot be made.)

 
Poldano
 
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02 February 2021 01:55
 

I don’t think they will react at all. Massive election fraud is almost always the excuse when elections are overturned. It seems to me most Republicans now are maintaining that there was not massive election fraud in the U.S. 2020 presidential election. Their fallback position to explain their support for any assertions otherwise is that they want to make sure that “the people” continue to have trust in the electoral system.

I consider this somewhat disingenuous, because “the people” whose trust must be affirmed and maintained are seemingly the same people who tend to confuse actors with the roles those actors play, and so are usually unaware that they themselves are playing roles scripted and directed, for the most part, by others.

 
 
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03 February 2021 15:35
 

So far, Poldano, you are right.  I asked my FOX News-addled dad what he thought of the coup and he denied knowing anything about it.  When I said the military overthrew a democratic government by claiming election fraud he replied, “So what?  Nobody cares about Myanmar.”  I’d like to extrapolate my dad’s sentiment to most American conservatives, and make the leap that they really don’t care about democracy unless it serves them, and would flush the system down the toilet if given the chance.

 
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03 February 2021 16:11
 
Skipshot - 03 February 2021 03:35 PM

So far, Poldano, you are right.  I asked my FOX News-addled dad what he thought of the coup and he denied knowing anything about it.  When I said the military overthrew a democratic government by claiming election fraud he replied, “So what?  Nobody cares about Myanmar.”  I’d like to extrapolate my dad’s sentiment to most American conservatives, and make the leap that they really don’t care about democracy unless it serves them, and would flush the system down the toilet if given the chance.

Every passing day gives me more reasons to dislike Republicans. But, judge not that you be not judged.  I’ll pretend they all had defective upbringings or defective genes, neither of which they could help.

 
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04 February 2021 00:17
 
Skipshot - 03 February 2021 03:35 PM

So far, Poldano, you are right.  I asked my FOX News-addled dad what he thought of the coup and he denied knowing anything about it.  When I said the military overthrew a democratic government by claiming election fraud he replied, “So what?  Nobody cares about Myanmar.”  I’d like to extrapolate my dad’s sentiment to most American conservatives, and make the leap that they really don’t care about democracy unless it serves them, and would flush the system down the toilet if given the chance.

Actually, I don’t think that anyone naively (i.e., without historical education) thinks that democracy matters. Only people with some knowledge of history, and specifically the history about how disagreements about government actions are settled, are likely to care about it. Even some of them give it only lip service, and seek to get around its restrictions whenever doing so is likely to increase their own wealth or power. The U.S. Constitution specifies a democratic republican form of government for the U.S. because those who drafted it knew exactly the kind of violence that inevitably happened when there were no non-violent ways to change the course of government; the history of the nation that culturally birthed theirs (i.e., England) was filled with such accounts.

What we see in the U.S. now are some people who yearn to change the course of government by violent means, and many of them are gaining traction in influencing the Republican party. Fifty years ago those of similar violent inclination were attempting to influence the Democratic party, but were largely rejected by that party as political actors except to identify politically potent issues. Where the Republican party treads on unstable ground, so to speak, is in sympathizing with the violent methods of those who seek to influence it instead of just with their stand on issues. Perhaps this is because the real issues of the radicals are not any that most Republicans can actually support overtly.