Study: COVID is Neurotrophic (can damage one’s brain)

 
Jefe
 
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Jefe
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02 April 2022 10:24
 

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-022-29440-z

Neurological manifestations are a significant complication of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), but underlying mechanisms aren’t well understood. The development of animal models that recapitulate the neuropathological findings of autopsied brain tissue from patients who died from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection are critical for elucidating the neuropathogenesis of infection and disease. Here, we show neuroinflammation, microhemorrhages, brain hypoxia, and neuropathology that is consistent with hypoxic-ischemic injury in SARS-CoV-2 infected non-human primates (NHPs), including evidence of neuron degeneration and apoptosis. Importantly, this is seen among infected animals that do not develop severe respiratory disease, which may provide insight into neurological symptoms associated with “long COVID”. Sparse virus is detected in brain endothelial cells but does not associate with the severity of central nervous system (CNS) injury. We anticipate our findings will advance our current understanding of the neuropathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and demonstrate SARS-CoV-2 infected NHPs are a highly relevant animal model for investigating COVID-19 neuropathogenesis among human subjects.

This should be chilling news for anyone who might be exposed to COVID.  And, IMHO, should be sufficient encouragement to take any reasonable precautions to avoid infection.

 

[ Edited: 02 April 2022 10:36 by Jefe]
 
 
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02 April 2022 10:39
 

Corroboration:

https://www.researchsquare.com/article/rs-1139035/v1

Abstract
COVID-19 is known to cause multi-organ dysfunction1-3 in acute infection, with prolonged symptoms experienced by some patients, termed Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC)4-5. However, the burden of infection outside the respiratory tract and time to viral clearance is not well characterized, particularly in the brain3,6-14. We performed complete autopsies on 44 patients with COVID-19 to map and quantify SARS-CoV-2 distribution, replication, and cell-type specificity across the human body, including brain, from acute infection through over seven months following symptom onset. We show that SARS-CoV-2 is widely distributed, even among patients who died with asymptomatic to mild COVID-19, and that virus replication is present in multiple extrapulmonary tissues early in infection. Further, we detected SARS-CoV-2 RNA in multiple anatomic sites, including regions throughout the brain, for up to 230 days following symptom onset. Despite extensive distribution of SARS-CoV-2 in the body, we observed a paucity of inflammation or direct viral cytopathology outside of the lungs. Our data prove that SARS-CoV-2 causes systemic infection and can persist in the body for months.

 
 
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02 April 2022 10:49
 

These studies suggest an increasing number of long-covid patients who will neurological symptoms that may not be temporary.

Also noteworthy is a decreasing appetite by some political spheres to downplay and ignore the long term effects of widespread COVID infection - despite some fairly predictable impacts on the economy.

Just because some politician tried to tell us the pandemic is ending, does not mean we should listen, or ignore experts in immunology, virology and health services.

I’m not clear what the perceived end-game is for these spheres.
Perhaps it is manufacturing plausible deniability in the face of looming (and snowballing) medical costs for mitigation and treatment.

 
 
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04 April 2022 01:10
 
Jefe - 02 April 2022 10:49 AM

I’m not clear what the perceived end-game is for these spheres.

The end game has been clear to me - do the opposite of the “liberals.”  COVID has unabashedly been politicized by conservatives as a liberal hoax, so ignoring the science is made easy.

 
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08 April 2022 08:13
 

I think part of it is just an issue of scale as well.  If you aren’t a scientists trying to study the problem, the problem can seem huge and overwhelming.  In the US, there have been 80 million documented cases.  Lets be generous and assume every person who had it, has had it twice.  That’s 40 million Americans.  Long covid seems to happen to about 43% of people who are infected, that’s 17 million Americans who just had some amount of either temporary or permanent brain damage.

That’s an astounding number, and that’s me underestimating the total number of unique individuals who have been infected.

In truth, it’s likely 140 million Americans have been infected, which would mean that 60.2 million Americans have had some amount of temporary or permanent brain damage.

This isn’t a problem that we can actually solve.  This is just a new reality and it’s kind of staggering.

In our evolutionary past, there have been viruses that altered or modified our ancestors to help shape us into what we are now.  It is possible that we might be witnessing such an event right now.  There are three possible outcomes: 1) a generation (all people living now) are just changed, but the species reverts to how it was before.  2) covid is permanently endemic, and it continues to do its damage to all future people.  3) it changes us genetically (source

There is no policy that can stop whatever is going to happen in this regard at this point.

 
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08 April 2022 20:47
 
weird buffalo - 08 April 2022 08:13 AM

There is no policy that can stop whatever is going to happen in this regard at this point.

But there ARE policies that can help mitigate it.  And I’m not talking about lock-downs.  But I am talking about actually learning as part of the ‘learn to live with it’ mantra.

See, in the past, when stuff was harming people, we made societal changes that helped mitigate those harms.  We can do so again, provided we’re not locked into the ‘nothing we can do’ mantra, or the laissez faire management running rampant in modern politics under the guise of personal freedoms.

I’ll cite Cholera and Polio as two excellent examples of people ‘learning’ and then coming together to mitigate risks.

Why our current modern society doesn’t have the collective will to do better, I don’t know.  I can’t figure out the end game for the ‘let ‘er rip’ crowd.

weird buffalo - 08 April 2022 08:13 AM

In truth, it’s likely 140 million Americans have been infected, which would mean that 60.2 million Americans have had some amount of temporary or permanent brain damage.

Extended globally, this is a terrifying (and admittedly, conservative) statistic.  How does this sort of medical blanket affect economies, medical professional morale and mental health, families, etc…?

What happens when it (long Covid) becomes a legal liability issue of human safety?  OSHA concerns?  Insurability questions?

[ Edited: 08 April 2022 20:57 by Jefe]
 
 
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08 April 2022 20:47
 

Duplicate